Prenatal infection and cavum septum pellucidum in adult schizophrenia.

Authors:
David M Kern
David M Kern
HealthCore, Inc. / Drexel University
Associate Director
Health outcomes; comparative effectiveness; neighborhood; social epidemiology
PHILADELPHIA, PA | United States

Schizophr Res 2009 Mar 8;108(1-3):285-7. Epub 2009 Jan 8.

Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, New York State Psychiatric Institute, Mailman School of Public Health, 1051 Riverside Drive, Unit 23, New York, NY 10032, USA.

Increased length of the cavum septum pellucidum (CSP) and in utero infection are each associated with increased risk of schizophrenia. Hence, we examined whether prenatal infections are related to CSP length in schizophrenia patients. In a well-characterized birth cohort, in utero infection was assessed using serologic biomarkers or physician diagnoses. Magnetic resonance images were acquired, and CSP length was quantified by a standard protocol. In utero infection was associated with increased CSP length in exposed schizophrenia cases compared to unexposed cases, suggesting that prenatal infection plays a role in a neurodevelopmental morphologic anomaly that has been related previously to schizophrenia.

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Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2008.11.018DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2821035PMC
March 2009
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