An extract of Salvia (sage) with anticholinesterase properties improves memory and attention in healthy older volunteers.

Authors:
Andrew B Scholey
Andrew B Scholey
Northumbria University
United Kingdom
Clive G Ballard
Clive G Ballard
Newcastle General Hospital
United Kingdom
Keith A Wesnes
Keith A Wesnes
Brain Sciences Institute
Australia
Andrea Tasker
Andrea Tasker
Institute for Ageing and Health
United Kingdom
Elaine K Perry
Elaine K Perry
Institute for Ageing and Health
David O Kennedy
David O Kennedy
Northumbria University
United Kingdom

Psychopharmacology (Berl) 2008 May 19;198(1):127-39. Epub 2008 Mar 19.

Brain Sciences Institute, Swinburne University, Melbourne, VIC, 3122, Australia.

Rationale: Species of Salvia (sage) have a long-standing reputation in European medical herbalism, including for memory enhancement. In recent controlled trials, administration of sage extracts with established cholinergic properties improved cognitive function in young adults.

Objectives: This randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind, balanced, five-period crossover study investigated the acute effects on cognitive performance of a standardised extract of Salvia officinalis in older adults.

Materials And Methods: Twenty volunteers (>65 years of age, mean = 72.95) received four active doses of extract (167, 333, 666 and 1332 mg) and a placebo with a 7-day wash-out period between visits. Assessment involved completion of the Cognitive Drug Research computerised assessment battery. On study days, treatments were administered immediately following a baseline assessment with further assessment at 1, 2.5, 4 and 6 h post treatment.

Results: Compared with the placebo condition (which exhibited the characteristic performance decline over the day), the 333-mg dose was associated with significant enhancement of secondary memory performance at all testing times. The same measure benefited to a lesser extent from other doses. There also were significant improvements to accuracy of attention following the 333-mg dose. In vitro analysis confirmed cholinesterase inhibiting properties for the extract.

Conclusions: The overall pattern of results is consistent with a dose-related benefit to processes involved in efficient stimulus processing and/or memory consolidation rather than retrieval or working memory efficiency. These findings extend those of the memory-enhancing effects of Salvia extracts in younger populations and warrant further investigation in larger series, in other populations and with different dosing regimes.

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May 2008
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