Global pharmacogenetics: giving the genome to the masses.

Authors:
Sharon Marsh
Sharon Marsh
Washington University School of Medicine
United States
Howard L McLeod
Howard L McLeod
University of North Carolina
United States

Pharmacogenomics 2006 Jun;7(4):625-31

Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Room 1021 CSRB NT, 660 South Euclid Avenue, Campus Box 8069, St Louis, MO 63110, USA.

With pharmacogenetics comes the promise of individualized therapy selection for many common diseases where multiple treatment options are available. Recent advances including the Human Genome Project, the International HapMap project, advances in throughput and reduction in cost of genetic testing, and the inclusion of genotype-related dosing recommendations into package inserts all point to the integration of pharmacogenetics into clinical practice. However, many countries will not have access to pharmacogenetics resources in the near future. Generation of global genotype profiles will provide a useful, but not perfect resource for incorporating pharmacogenetics into national drug formularies in the form of prioritization or surveillance where individual genotype data would not be attainable. The PharmacoGenetics for Every Nation Initiative is a first step to making pharmacogenetics applicable on a global level.

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/14622416.7.4.625DOI Listing
June 2006
4 Reads

Publication Analysis

Top Keywords

pharmacogenetics
6
resources future
4
pharmacogenetics resources
4
will access
4
countries will
4
access pharmacogenetics
4
future generation
4
profiles will
4
genotype profiles
4
global genotype
4
generation global
4
practice countries
4
pharmacogenetics clinical
4
genotype-related dosing
4
inclusion genotype-related
4
testing inclusion
4
genetic testing
4
dosing recommendations
4
recommendations package
4
will provide
4

Similar Publications

Applying the genome to national drug formulary policy in the developing world.

Pharmacogenomics 2010 May;11(5):633-6

Institute of Pharmacogenomics & Individualized Therapy, UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7361, USA.

With pharmacogenetics comes the promise of individualized therapy selection for many common diseases where multiple treatment options are available. Recent advances including the Human Genome Project, the International HapMap project, advances in throughput technology and reduction in cost of genetic testing, and the inclusion of genotype-related dosing recommendations into package inserts all point to the integration of pharmacogenetics into clinical practice. However, many countries will not have access to pharmacogenetics resources to individualize patient therapy for decades to come. Read More

View Article
May 2010

Relevance of pharmacogenomics for developing countries in Europe.

Drug Metabol Drug Interact 2011 21;26(4):143-6. Epub 2011 Oct 21.

Golden Helix Institute of Biomedical Research, Athens, Greece.

Pharmacogenomics holds promise of personalized treatment for patients suffering from many common diseases, particularly those with multiple treatment modalities. Owing to recent advances in the deciphering of the human genome sequence, high throughput genotyping technology has led to the reduction of the overall costs of genetic testing and allowed the inclusion of genotype-related dosing recommendations into drug package inserts, hence enabling the integration of pharmacogenomics into clinical practice. Although pharmacogenomics gradually assumes an important part in routine clinical practice in developed countries, many countries, particularly from the developing world, still do not have access either to the knowledge or the resources to individualize drug therapy. Read More

View Article
March 2012

Pharmacogenetics and rational drug use around the world.

Pharmacogenomics 2011 Jun;12(6):897-905

Institute of Pharmacogenomics & Individualized Therapy, UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, CB #7361, 120 Mason Farm Road, 1092 Genetic Medicine Building, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7361, USA.

The WHO embraces evidence-based medicine to formulate an essential medicines list (EML) considering disease prevalence, drug efficacy, drug safety and cost-effectiveness. The EML is used by developing countries to build a national formulary. As pharmacogenetics in developed countries evolves, the Pharmacogenetics for Every Nation Initiative (PGENI) convened with representatives from China, Mexico, Ghana and South Africa in August 2009 to evaluate the use of human pharmacogenetics to enhance global drug use policy. Read More

View Article
June 2011

Pharmacogenomics: from bedside to clinical practice.

Hum Mol Genet 2006 Apr;15 Spec No 1:R89-93

Division of Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA.

The field of pharmacogenomics has seen some exciting advances in the recent past. The Human Genome Project and International HapMap projects have uncovered a wealth of information for researchers. The discovery of clinically predictive genotypes (e. Read More

View Article
April 2006