[Jaws of human].

Authors:
Tomohito Nagaoka

Clin Calcium 2005 09;15(9):1548-50

Department of Anatomy, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Kawasaki, Kanagawa, Japan.

Some of main morphological differences between living humans and apes are seen in the size and overall proportions of mandibles;for example, in mandibular dental arch, angle of mandible, height of coronoid process and condyle, and development of chin. Here I review the comparative anatomy of mandible in the living humans and great apes and introduce briefly the morphological features in fossil hominid mandibles.

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September 2005

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