HIV prevention with Mexican migrants: review, critique, and recommendations.

J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr 2004 Nov;37 Suppl 4:S227-39

School of Social Welfare, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-7400, USA.

Charged with the task of reviewing the research outcome literature on HIV prevention with Mexican migrants in the United States, the following broad observations and conclusion were made: (1) there is little research on this specialized topic of concern; (2) the research that exists reflects an overly individualistic behavioral science approach designed to reduce individual risk factors, with little regard for structural and environmental factors that influence HIV risk; and (3) there is a compelling need to develop better theoretic frameworks for understanding the complex and dynamic social and cultural processes influencing sexual behavior among Mexican migrants so as to better inform HIV prevention efforts with this unique and diverse Latino(a) population.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.qai.0000141250.08475.91DOI Listing
November 2004

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