Dietary approach to attenuate oxidative stress, hypertension, and inflammation in the cardiovascular system.

Authors:
Lingyun Wu
Lingyun Wu
University of Saskatchewan
Canada
Marina Facci
Marina Facci
University of Saskatchewan
Canada
Rui Wang
Rui Wang
Laurentian University
Sudbury | Canada
Phyllis G Paterson
Phyllis G Paterson
University of Saskatchewan

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2004 May 21;101(18):7094-9. Epub 2004 Apr 21.

Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada S7N 5E5.

Imbalance between production and scavenging of superoxide anion results in hypertension by the inactivation of nitric oxide, and the increased oxidative stress from the resultant peroxynitrite that is produced promotes inflammatory processes such as atherosclerosis. Induction of phase 2 proteins promotes oxidant scavenging. We hypothesized that intake of dietary phase 2 protein inducers would ameliorate both hypertension and atherosclerotic changes in the spontaneously hypertensive stroke-prone rat. For 5 days/week for 14 weeks, we fed rats 200 mg/day of dried broccoli sprouts that contained glucoraphanin, which is metabolized into the phase 2 protein-inducer sulforaphane (Group A), sprouts in which most of the glucoraphanin was destroyed (Group B), or no sprouts (Group C). After 14 weeks of treatment, no significant differences were seen between rats in Groups B and C. Rats in Group A had significantly decreased oxidative stress in cardiovascular and kidney tissues, as shown by increased glutathione (GSH) content and decreased oxidized GSH, decreased protein nitrosylation, as well as increased GSH reductase and GSH peroxidase activities. Decreased oxidative stress correlated with better endothelial-dependent relaxation of the aorta and significantly lower (20 mm Hg) blood pressure. Tissues from Groups B and C had considerable numbers of infiltrating activated macrophages, indicative of inflammation, whereas animals in Group A had few detectable infiltrating macrophages. There is interest in dietary phase 2 protein inducers as means of reducing cancer incidence. We conclude that a diet containing phase 2 protein inducers also reduces the risk of developing cardiovascular problems of hypertension and atherosclerosis.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0402004101DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC406471PMC

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May 2004
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