Corneal fungal disease in small animals.

Authors:
Stacy E Andrew

Clin Tech Small Anim Pract 2003 Aug;18(3):186-92

Georgia Veterinary Specialists, 455 Abernathy Road NE, Atlanta, GA 30328, USA.

Corneal fungal diseases, including fungal keratitis and stromal abscess, are uncommon in small animals. Ocular infection secondary to systemic mycosis is reported far more frequently. Suspicion of a fungal corneal ulcer should be raised based on a history of underlying trauma, especially with plant material, geographic location, chronic use of topical antibiotics or corticosteroids, or an extremely prolonged course of disease despite appropriate treatment. Clinical signs observed with fungal keratitis may include blepharospasm, epiphora, miosis, corneal opacity, and vascularization. Unfortunately, none of these signs is specific to fungal infection. If fungal keratitis is suspected or confirmed, then aggressive medical therapy should be instituted. Medications used include topical antifungals, parasympatholytics, anticollagenases, and antibacterials as well as systemic anti-inflammatory drugs. Because there are very few fungicidal medications, the course of medical treatment for fungal corneal disease requires a prolonged duration with frequent re-examination and assessment. Surgical treatment is sometimes required to save the eye and vision. Surgeries to be considered include debridement, conjunctival graft placement, and corneal transplantation.

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s1096-2867(03)90015-6DOI Listing
August 2003

Publication Analysis

Top Keywords

fungal keratitis
12
fungal corneal
8
corneal fungal
8
small animals
8
fungal
7
corneal
6
include blepharospasm
4
keratitis include
4
observed fungal
4
signs observed
4
vascularization signs
4
frequent re-examination
4
blepharospasm epiphora
4
corneal opacity
4
miosis corneal
4
epiphora miosis
4
clinical signs
4
opacity vascularization
4
duration frequent
4
re-examination assessment
4

Similar Publications