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    Subcutaneous fat necrosis of the newborn: a review of 11 cases.
    Pediatr Dermatol 1999 Sep-Oct;16(5):384-7
    Department of Dermatology, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    Subcutaneous fat necrosis (SFN) of the newborn is uncommon and usually occurs in the first weeks of life following a complicated delivery. The frequency with which hypercalcemia develops as a complication is uncertain. We report the clinical features of SFN in 11 patients seen between 1991 and 1998. Ten were born by cesarean section and fetal distress was present in the majority. It was not possible to distinguish SFN from sclerema neonatorum by time of onset or related infant diseases. Hypercalcemia developed in four infants up to 7 weeks after the onset of SFN. Infants with this condition should be carefully monitored for hypercalcemia.

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