Mohamed Abdelwahab, MD, MSc, PhD candidate - Stanford University - Clinical Research Scholar (PhD student)

Mohamed Abdelwahab

MD, MSc, PhD candidate

Stanford University

Clinical Research Scholar (PhD student)

Stanford, CA | United States

Main Specialties: Otolaryngology, Plastic Surgery, Surgery

Additional Specialties: Facial Plastic Surgery / OMFS / Rhinology

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-2588-8355


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Mohamed Abdelwahab, MD, MSc, PhD candidate - Stanford University - Clinical Research Scholar (PhD student)

Mohamed Abdelwahab

MD, MSc, PhD candidate

Introduction

Clinical Research Scholar at Stanford University, Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, CA, USA

Medical Doctorate (PhD) Student at Division of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University, Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, CA, USA

Assistant Lecturer Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Mansoura University, School of Medicine, Egypt

Primary Affiliation: Stanford University - Stanford, CA , United States

Specialties:

Additional Specialties:

Research Interests:


View Mohamed Abdelwahab’s Resume / CV

Education

Dec 2017
Stanford University
PhD
Intraoperative Imaging for flaps
Jun 2016
Mansoura University
Fellow
Rhinology and Skull base
Feb 2015
Mansoura University
Fellow
OMFS
Mar 2010
Mansoura University
Resident O-HNS

Publications

15Publications

1334Reads

24Profile Views

Facial Paralysis and Communicative Participation: The Importance of Facial Symmetry at Rest.

Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol 2020 Aug 19;129(8):788-794. Epub 2020 Mar 19.

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Division of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003489420912446DOI Listing
August 2020
1.054 Impact Factor

Impact of Dorsal Preservation Rhinoplasty Versus Dorsal Hump Resection on the Internal Nasal Valve: a Quantitative Radiological Study.

Aesthetic Plast Surg 2020 06 3;44(3):879-887. Epub 2020 Feb 3.

Division of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, 801 Welch Road, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA.

Background: This study evaluates the impact of different hump takedown techniques, namely the conventional hump resection with midvault reconstruction, the push-down (PD) and the let-down (LD) procedures, on the INV dimensions.

Methods: In this cadaveric study, six heads were divided randomly into either the conventional hump resection technique (Group A; n?=?6 sides) or DPR techniques (n?=?6 sides). This latter group was subdivided such that initially a PD procedure was performed (Group B; n?=?6 sides), followed by a LD procedure on the same heads (Group C; n?=?6 sides). A validated radiological method was used to measure the INV angle and cross-sectional area (CSA) in a modified coronal plane both pre- and post-procedurally.

Results: Group A did not show significant reduction in the INV angle nor in CSA (p?=?0.068 and p?=?0.156, respectively). In the push-down group (B), we observed a mean change of 2.05° in the angles and 0.3 cm in the CSA (p?=?0.0163 and p?
Conclusion: Neither the conventional hump resection nor the LD DPR technique reduced the INV dimensions. However, the PD preservation technique significantly reduced the INV dimensions.

Level Of Evidence Iii: This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00266-020-01627-zDOI Listing
June 2020
1.189 Impact Factor

A Review and Modification of Dorsal Preservation Rhinoplasty Techniques.

Facial Plast Surg Aesthet Med 2020 Mar/Apr;22(2):71-79

Division of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/fpsam.2020.0017DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7312707PMC
March 2020

The miniature lateral crural strut graft: Efficacy of a novel technique in tip plasty

The Laryngoscope

Objectives/Hypothesis: To describe a novel technique for tip plasty and determine its efficacy using validated patientreported outcome measures and objective measures. Study Design: Retrospective cohort study. Methods: This study was carried out at a tertiary center. Patients undergoing tip plasty using the miniature lateral crural strut grafts (mini-LCSG) in cosmetic/combined rhinoplasty between January 2016 and August 2019 with available outcome measures were included. We used the Standardized Cosmesis and Health Nasal Outcomes Survey (SCHNOS), Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation (NOSE) scores, visual analog scale: functional and cosmetic, and lateral wall insufficiency (LWI) grades. Results: Among 52 patients, 33 were included; 26 had cosmetic whereas seven had combined functional and cosmetic rhinoplasty, with a follow-up up to 3 years. Both cosmetic and combined subjects showed significant improvement in SCHNOSCosmesis (C) scores (−57.31 1.79, P < .001 and − 53.57 8.39, P < .001, respectively) and zone 1 LWI (P < .05, both sides). SCHNOS-Obstruction (O) and NOSE scores showed significant decrease among subjects undergoing combined rhinoplasty only (−55.36 18.58, P < .004, and − 53.93 15.99, P < .003, respectively). With specific regard to tip cosmesis, the mean SCHNOS-6 (item 6 of the SCHNOS questionnaire for tip cosmesis) showed significant improvement (−2.61, P < .001). Conclusions: The mini-LCSG is a novel modification for tip plasty that improves tip cosmesis and symmetry, both subjectively and objectively without compromising nasal function. Key Words: Lateral crural strut graft, mini–lateral crural strut graft, tip plasty, rhinoplasty, validated outcome measures, internal nasal valve. Level of Evidence: 4

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February 2020

Impact Factor 2.400

17 Reads

Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma Staging with a Novel Nominal Basis: An 18-Year Study in a Tertiary Center.

Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2019 08 23;161(2):352-361. Epub 2019 Apr 23.

2 Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt.

Objective: To develop a systematic method for anatomic mapping of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) tumors to standardize communication, facilitate surgical planning, and convey prognosis.

Study Design: Retrospective cohort.

Setting: Tertiary referral center.

Subjects And Methods: Following Institutional Review Board approval, we performed a retrospective review of radiologic and angiographic data of patients with JNA presenting to the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Mansoura University, from 2001 to 2017. All patients underwent angiography with embolization and had >1-year follow-up. Based on frequently involved anatomic sites and factors predictive of prognosis, the NSF-COR staging system (nose/nasopharynx, sinus, fossa-cranium, orbit, residual internal carotid artery supply) was developed to explicitly convey anatomic site of involvement and presence of residual vascularity. We validated the NSF-COR staging system against other systems with Pearson chi-square test based on risk factors and clinical outcomes of blood transfusion volume, recurrence, and JNA resectability.

Results: Fifty-four patients met inclusion criteria, where all primary cases (100%) demonstrated nose/nasopharynx involvement, followed by sinus (85.2%), natural fossae (85.2%), intracranial (26%), and orbital involvement (16.7%). These sites, with assessment of residual internal carotid artery vascular supply, were used to develop the NSF-COR anatomically based staging system. The components COR showed significant association with clinical outcomes of blood transfusion and recurrence. Contingency coefficients between the NSF-COR staging system and available staging systems showed significant correlations ( < .05) for prognosis.

Conclusion: The NSF-COR staging system conveys a communicable anatomic map of JNA tumors that integrates residual vascularity of the tumor and demonstrates strong concordance with current staging systems to assess clinical outcomes.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0194599819842155DOI Listing
August 2019
131 Reads
1.721 Impact Factor

Impact of Distraction Osteogenesis Maxillary Expansion on the Internal Nasal Valve in Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2019 08 14;161(2):362-367. Epub 2019 May 14.

1 Division of Sleep Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0194599819842808DOI Listing
August 2019
121 Reads
1.721 Impact Factor

Minimal Clinically Important Difference of the Standardized Cosmesis and Health Nasal Outcomes Survey.

Aesthet Surg J 2019 07;39(8):837-840

Professor and Division Chief, Division of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/asj/sjz070DOI Listing
July 2019
6 Reads
2.034 Impact Factor

Neovascularization Perfusion of Melolabial Flaps Using Intraoperative Indocyanine Green Angiography.

JAMA Facial Plast Surg 2019 May;21(3):230-236

Division of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamafacial.2018.1874DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6537835PMC
May 2019
13 Reads

Association of Periosteal Sweeping vs Periosteal Preservation With Early Periorbital Sequelae Among Patients Undergoing External Perforating Osteotomy During Rhinoplasty.

JAMA Facial Plast Surg 2019 May;21(3):185-190

Division of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamafacial.2018.1730DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6537926PMC
May 2019
120 Reads

Utility of Indocyanine Green Angiography to Identify Clinical Factors Associated With Perfusion of Paramedian Forehead Flaps During Nasal Reconstruction Surgery.

JAMA Facial Plast Surg 2019 May;21(3):206-212

Division of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamafacial.2018.1829DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6537837PMC
May 2019
126 Reads

Arabic Validation of the Standardized Cosmesis and Health Nasal Outcome Survey for Arabic-Speaking Rhinoplasty Patients.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2019 03;143(3):673e-675e

Division of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Calif., Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Mansoura University Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura, Egypt Department of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, Turku University Hospital and University of Turku, Turku, Finland Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Mansoura University Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura, Egypt Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada Division of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Calif.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000005357DOI Listing
March 2019
571 Reads
2.993 Impact Factor

Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Standardized Cosmesis and Health Nasal Outcomes Survey.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2019 02;143(2):454e-456e

Department of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, Turku University Hospital and University of Turku, Turku, Finland Division of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Calif. Division of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Calif., Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt Division of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Calif. Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada Division of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Calif.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000005248DOI Listing
February 2019
13 Reads
2.993 Impact Factor

Psychometric Properties of the Standardized Cosmesis and Health Nasal Outcomes Survey: Item Response Theory Analysis.

JAMA Facial Plast Surg 2018 Dec;20(6):519-521

Division of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamafacial.2018.0626DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6248213PMC
December 2018
9 Reads

Endoscopic enucleation of large jaw cysts: Promising outcomes.

Auris Nasus Larynx 2018 Jun 24;45(3):578-584. Epub 2017 Sep 24.

Otolaryngology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura University, Egypt. Electronic address:

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S03858146173015
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anl.2017.08.008DOI Listing
June 2018
224 Reads
1.004 Impact Factor

Biportal transparotid dissection in the retromandibular approach for condylar fracture osteosynthesis: Efficacy of a novel technique.

J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg.

OBJECTIVE:

Facial nerve injury is a primary complication of open surgical management of condylar fractures. A new modification of the retromandibular transparotid approach, the "biportal transparotid dissection" (BTD), was developed to reduce these injuries in accidental nerve exposure.

DESIGN:

Prospective cohort study.

SETTING:

Tertiary referral center.

METHODS:

Patients managed by retromandibular transparotid approach for condylar fractures at Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Mansoura University were included between November 2015 and August 2019 with exclusion of cases managed endoscopically or by a closed approach. Three groups were identified: Group A included patients undergoing the BTD technique, which entails transparotid dissection above and below exposed nerve branches and minimal nerve retraction; Group B included patients undergoing traditional dissection and nerve retraction away from the surgical field; and Group C included patients with unidentified facial nerve branches. The function of facial nerve branches was documented postoperatively.

RESULTS:

Fifty-seven fractures were included in the study. Facial nerve branches' injury occurred in 13 cases (22.8%): two (of ten) in Group A (20%), seven (of ten) in Group B (70%) and four (of 37) in Group C (10.81%). Compared to patients with non-exposed branches, Groups A and B were found to have 2.06 (p = 0.447) and 19.25 (p = 0.001) greater odds of nerve injury, respectively. The results showed significant faster nerve recovery in the BTD group compared to traditional dissection (mean 5 versus 9 weeks) (p = 0.015).

CONCLUSION AND RELEVANCE:

Although avoiding facial nerve exposure minimizes injury the most, BTD approach reduces exposed nerve injury compared to the traditional method.

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November -0001
19 Reads