Dr.  Eren Ogut, PhD - Department of Anatomy / Bahcesehir University School of Medicine  - Asst. Prof.

Dr. Eren Ogut

PhD

Department of Anatomy / Bahcesehir University School of Medicine

Asst. Prof.

Istanbul | Turkey

Main Specialties: Craniofacial Surgery, Neurological Surgery, Neurology, Surgery

Additional Specialties: Anatomy

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0003-2506-9883


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Dr.  Eren Ogut, PhD - Department of Anatomy / Bahcesehir University School of Medicine  - Asst. Prof.

Dr. Eren Ogut

PhD

Introduction

Graduated from Istanbul University Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Ph.D. in Akdeniz University School of Medicine worked in Universita Degli Studi di Siena in Italy and currently works as a lecturer in Bahçesehir University. His research interests are based on neuroanatomy, dissection based cadaver studies, dissection of the hippocampus, and effects of the learning&memory process and neurotoxicological chronic disorders of the hippocampus.

Primary Affiliation: Department of Anatomy / Bahcesehir University School of Medicine - Istanbul , Turkey

Specialties:

Additional Specialties:

Research Interests:

Education

Jul 2018
Akdeniz University School of Medicine Department of Anatomy
PhD
Sep 2015
Università degli Studi di Siena Department of Anatomy
PhDsc
Jul 2014
Akdeniz University School of Medicine Department of Anatomy
Msc
Jun 2006
istanbul University Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty

Experience

Sep 2018
Bahcesehir University School of Medicine Department of Anatomy
Asst. Prof.
2018-Currently working
Jul 2015
Università degli Studi di Siena Department of Anatomy
PhDsc
Sep 2011
Akdeniz University School of Medicine Department of Anatomy
Research Asst.

Publications

20Publications

258Reads

55Profile Views

69PubMed Central Citations

Pterygomaxillary junction: morphometric analysis and clinical aspect

EBSCOhost Geneva Foundation for Medical Education and Research Google Scholar Index Copernicus Ulrich's Periodicals Directory

International Journal of Anatomical Variations

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September 2020
42 Reads

EVALUATION OF PHYSICAL EXERCISE'S EFFECTS ON LOW BACK PAIN AMONG UNIVERSITY STUDENTS WITH SHORT FORM-36 AND OSWESTRY DISABILITY INDEX

10.4274/tmsj.galenos.2020.07.02.04

TURKISH MEDICAL STUDENT JOURNAL

Aims: This study aims to investigate the main effects of physical exercise on lower back pain with the Short Form-36 Health Survey and Oswestry Disability Index scores. Methods: University students between 18-25 years old who suffer from low back pain were enrolled in the study. Short Form-36 Health Survey and Oswestry Disability Index were used as the reference scales of lower back pain and quality of life, respectively. There are some questions in the questionnaire to scale the average comfort of the place they sleep and sit during the day, which is the result of the Personal Comfort Score. The Mann-Whitney U test was used for non-normal distributed variables. Correlation and Linear Regression were used to analyze data. SPSS 25.0 was used for all statistical analysis. Results: A total of 139 university students (94 females, 45 males) were included in the study. The median age was 20 years (IQR=2) for female students and 20 years (IQR=1) for male students. Oswestry Disability Index scores of fe- male students were higher, while Short Form-36 scores were lower than the male students. Male students' physical functioning scores were higher than female students. Each one-unit increase in Personal Comfort Score is associated with an increase in the rate between the energy/fatigue (3.34 units). Body Mass Index considerably affected the pain and Oswestry Disability Score, an increase in one unit of baseline BMI upsurged the Short Form-36 pain score to 0.13, and Oswestry disability score to 0.55. Conc- lusion: In our study, Body Mass Index is found to be associated with Oswestry Disability Index and Short Form-36 score, which are used for the severity of low back pain and defining the life quality and of patients. PCS had a positive correlation between energy/fatigue. In addition, There was a positive correlation between physical exercise and general health score.

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July 2020
2 Reads

Intraforaminal Dural Septations of the Jugular Foramen: a Cadaveric Study.

World Neurosurg 2020 Jun 6. Epub 2020 Jun 6.

Department of Anatomy, School of Medicine, Bahcesehir University, Istanbul, TURKEY. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wneu.2020.05.271DOI Listing
June 2020
2.417 Impact Factor

Anatomo-radiological importance and the incidence of os odontoideum in Turkish subjects: a retrospective study.

Surg Radiol Anat 2020 Jun 27;42(6):701-710. Epub 2020 Jan 27.

Department of Anatomy, School of Medicine, Akdeniz University, 07070, Antalya, Turkey.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00276-020-02421-xDOI Listing
June 2020
1.333 Impact Factor

Anatomo-radiological importance and the incidence of os odontoideum in Turkish subjects: a retrospective study

2020 Jun;42(6):701-710

Surgical and Radiologic Anatomy

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Os odontoideum is a rare anatomical and morphological variation of the odontoid process and associated with a range of symptoms such as spinal cord and vertebral artery injuries. This study aimed to evaluate the frequency of os odontoideum in Turkish cases by sagittal/coronal cervical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) and analyze the relationship with age, gender and related symptoms.

METHODS:

The incidence of os odontoideum was retrospectively diagnosed by sagittal/coronal cervical CT and MRI out of 16,122 subjects aged 20-70 years (mean 46) in the period between 2014 and 2018. The relationship of os odontoideum with age, gender, and symptoms was recorded.

RESULTS:

The statistical analysis of the study was performed by the χ² test and two-way mixed ANOVA. Os odontoideum was detected in 18 (0.11%) (11 males; 7 females) out of 16,122 patients. The mean age was 47.5 ± 1.4 years in the females and 43.5 ± 2.5 years in the males (p < 0.05). 6 odontoideum were detected out of 6467 (3756 males, mean 48 ± 0.7, 2711 females, mean 46 ± 1.2) subjects by CT and 12 odontoideum were detected out of 9655 patients (5607 males and 4048 females) by MRI.

CONCLUSION:

Neck pain was the most frequent symptom. The prevalence of os odontoideum especially round type is more frequent in older male patients over 40 years old with head and neck pain or atlantoaxial instability, and is less common in Turkish subjects when compared to various ethnic groups.

KEYWORDS:

Odontoid; Odontoid duplication; Odontoid process; Odontoideum; Os odontoideum

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June 2020

1 Citation

Impact Factor 1.039

41 Reads

Intraforaminal Dural Septations of the Jugular Foramen: A Cadaveric Study

World Neurosurg.

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to define the types, prevalences and diameters of dural septations on the inner surface of the JF and to describe the distances between the JF, the glossopharyngeal (CN IX), vagus (CN X) and accessory (CN XI) nerves, the internal acoustic meatus (IAM), and nearby surgical landmarks on cadaveric heads.

Methods: Seventeen adult (9 male, 8 female) formalin-fixed cadaveric heads were used to analyze the types and prevalence of DS bilaterally. Diameters and distances between the DS and the adjacent cranial nerves (CN IX-XI) were measured by digital microcaliper. The multiple t test (SPSS 25) was used to analyze the comparison between both sides via diameters, numbers, distance, length, thickness of DS.

Results: The most frequent type of DS was type I (62.5%, right; 56.3% left), followed by type II (18.8%, right; 25% left), type III (12.5%, right; 6.3% left) and type IV (6.3%, right; 12.5% left). The mean diameter of the septum was 0.6 -1 mm, and the mean length of the dural septa was 4.01 mm, right; 3.83 mm, left. The difference in the length and thickness of the DS between the genders were statistically significant on both sides (p <0.05). The female DS-CN X and DS-JF distances were greater than those of males on the right side (p <0.05).

Conclusions: The significant differences between dural septum types on the two sides of the body may indicate asymmetrical location or a variant emerging site of CNs in the same individual.

Keywords: Dural septum; jugular dural septum; jugular foramen; types of dural septum; variations of dural septum.

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June 2020

Impact Factor 2.400

1 Read

Protective effects of syringic acid on neurobehavioral deficits and hippocampal tissue damages induced by sub-chronic deltamethrin exposure.

Neurotoxicol Teratol 2019 Nov - Dec;76:106839. Epub 2019 Oct 20.

Department of Histology and Embryology, School of Medicine, Akdeniz University, Antalya 07070, Turkey.

Recent developments in the field of insecticide exposure have led to a renewed interest in alternative antioxidant therapy. The present study was to investigate the neuroprotective role of syringic acid (SA, 25?mg/kg/day) on the neurotoxicity and oxidative damage induced by deltamethrin (DTM, 1.28?mg/kg/day during two months) in CA1/3 pyramidal neurons. Animals were divided into 4 groups (n?=?16/group) (250-270?g) for control, DTM, SA and DTM?+?SA. DTM and SA were administered by oral gavage daily. Rats that were given sub-chronic DTM had revealed a significant increase in caspase-3 levels, impaired recognition memory, reduced antioxidant activity and enhanced free radicals in the hippocampus. The results showed that SA ameliorated neurobehavioral alterations, reduced reactive oxygen/nitrogen species, pyknosis in the CA1/3 and increased antioxidant enzyme activity. In conclusion, SA (25?mg/kg/day) had potential neuroprotective and therapeutic impacts against sub-chronic DTM exposure via its antioxidant and antiapoptotic efficacy. Therefore, it can be used as a neuroprotective natural plant-derived agent against DTM-induced neurotoxicity.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ntt.2019.106839DOI Listing
May 2020
2.902 Impact Factor

The Effects of Syringic Acid on Learning & Memory After Chronic Deltamethrin Exposure in Wistar Rats

APR 2020 Volume: 236 Pages: 201-201 Supplement: 1

JOURNAL OF ANATOMY

Recent developments in the field of deltamethrin (DTM) exposure have led to a renewed interest in alternative antioxidant therapy against toxicity mechanism of DTM. The aim of present study was to evaluate the neuroprotective role of syringic acid (SA) after chronic DTM toxicity on rat hippocampus by biochemical, histopathological, immunohistochemical analysis and learning & memory tests. In this study sixty four adult male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups consisting of control (I) , deltamethrin (II), deltamethrin + syringic acid (III), syringic acid (IV). [treated with 25 mg/kg doses of syringic acid after deltamethrin exposure with 1.28-1.35 mg / kg doses by oral gavage daily for 2 months]. Spatial and working memory were evaluated by open field and radial arm maze tests.Total antioxidant capacity, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, glutamate/glutamine expressions and dopamine levels of hippocampus were also determined. Syringic acid (SA) improved spatial & working memory and locomotor activity against DTM. SA and SA+DTM led to increase total antioxidant capacity, while significantly reduced the oxidative stress and apoptosis (CA1/CA3 subfields) of the hippocampus. It had no significant effects on the glutamate/glutamic acid expression of the hippocampus but enhanced the dopamine levels (p<0,05).A positive correlation was found between dopamine and learning. The study has shown that SA therapy could increase short and long term memory while decreasing oxidative stress and apoptosis in hippocampus after chronic DTM application. An additional important finding to emerge in this study is SA may lead to improve learning and memory with stimulation of dopamine expression.

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April 2020
39 Reads

Neuroprotective Effects of Ozone Therapy After Sciatic Nerve Cut Injury.

Kurume Med J 2020 Jan 8;65(4):137-144. Epub 2019 Aug 8.

Department of Histology and Embryology, Faculty of Medicine, Akdeniz University.

A number of antioxidants have been used to treat peripheral nerve injury. However, there are few definitive experimental studies of ozone therapy for peripheral nerve cut injury. We aimed to examine the effects of mild level ozone therapy on sciatic nerve regeneration. One hundred adult male Wistar albino rats were randomly divided into four groups: group 1 (n=20) no cut injury or therapy; group 2 (n=20) sham; group 3 (n=30) nerve cut injury, no therapy; group 4 (n=30) nerve cut injury and ozone therapy. Sciatic functional index (SFI) and withdrawal reflex (WDR) were measured for all groups before nerve cut, at postoperative day 1, and at weeks 2, 4, 6 and 8. More myelinated (M) nerve fibers were observed after nerve cut injury in the ozone-therapy group. Significant differences were seen in plasma SOD (superoxide dismutase), CAT (catalase) and GPx (glutathione peroxidase) activities (p<0.05), and significant functional improvement was observed at postoperative weeks 2 and 4 (p<0.05) after ozone treatment. This is the first study conducted for the purpose of examining the effects of ozone therapy on sciatic nerve cut injury.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2739/kurumemedj.MS654002DOI Listing
January 2020
1 Read
1 Citation

Effect of Pulsed and Continuous Ultrasound Therapy on the Degree of Collateral Axonal Branching at the Lesion Site, Polyinnervation of Motor End Plates, and Recovery of Motor Function after Facial Nerve Reconstruction.

Anat Rec (Hoboken) 2019 08 23;302(8):1314-1324. Epub 2019 Apr 23.

Anatomical Institute I, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany.

The aim of the present study is to test whether ultrasound therapy of muscles denervated by nerve injury would improve the quality of their reinnervation by reduction of the collateral axonal branching at the lesion site and poly-innervation degree at the neuromuscular junctions. After transection and suture of the buccal branch of the facial nerve, pulsed or continuous type of ultrasound therapy was applied to the paralyzed whisker pad muscles of rats in the course of 2?months. Instead of reduction, we found a significant increase in the collateral axonal branching after continuous ultrasound therapy when compared to the branching determined after pulsed or sham ultrasound therapy. Both types of ultrasound therapy also failed to reduce the proportion of polyinnervated end plates in the reinnervated facial muscles. Accordingly, continuous ultrasound therapy failed to restore any parameter of the motor performance of the vibrissal hairs. Application of pulsed ultrasound therapy promoted slight improvements of the functional parameters angular velocity and acceleration. The inhomogeneous structural and functional results achieved after both types of ultrasound therapy let us conclude that further studies are required to evaluate its effects on peripheral nerve regeneration. Anat Rec, 302:1314-1324, 2019. © 2019 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/ar.24122
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ar.24122DOI Listing
August 2019
15 Reads
1 Citation
1.530 Impact Factor

Melatonin is protective against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced oxidative stress in a hemiparkinsonian rat model.

Free Radic Res 2015 25;49(8):1004-14. Epub 2015 Apr 25.

Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Akdeniz University , Antalya , Turkey.

Melatonin is known to reduce detrimental effects of free radicals by stimulating antioxidant enzymes; however, its role has not been studied in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD). Therefore, we aimed to elucidate the effects of melatonin on motor activity and oxidative stress parameters in 6-OHDA-induced rat model of PD. Three-month-old male Wistar rats were divided into 5 groups: vehicle (V), melatonin-treated (M), 6-OHDA-injected (6-OHDA), 6-OHDA-injected + melatonin-treated (6-OHDA-Mel), and melatonin-treated + 6-OHDA-injected (Mel-6-OHDA) group. Melatonin was administered intraperitoneally at a dose of 10 mg/kg/day for 30 days in M and Mel-6-OHDA groups, for 7 days in 6-OHDA-Mel group. Rats received a unilateral stereotaxic injection of 6-OHDA into the right medial forebrain bundle. The 6-OHDA-Mel group started receiving melatonin when experimental PD was created and the treatment was continued for 7 days. In the Mel-6-OHDA group, experimental PD was created on the 23rd day of melatonin treatment and continued for the remaining 7 days. Locomotor activity decreased in 6-OHDA group compared with that in vehicle group; however, melatonin treatment did not improve this impairment. 6-OHDA injection caused an obvious reduction in tyrosine-hydroxylase-positive dopaminergic neuron viability as determined by immunohistochemistry. Melatonin supplementation decreased dopaminergic neuron death in 6-OHDA-Mel and Mel-6-OHDA groups compared with that in 6-OHDA group. Biochemical analysis confirmed the beneficial effects of melatonin displaying higher superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase activities and lower lipid peroxidation in substantia nigra samples in comparison to non-treated 6-OHDA group. Starting melatonin treatment before creating experimental PD was more effective on observed changes.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/10715762.2015.1027198DOI Listing
April 2016
2 Reads
19 Citations

Bifid alveol and root of the canine teeth

Crossref ESCI

Eur J Ther

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March 2016
42 Reads

An osteologic study of human ethmoidal foramina with special reference to their classification and symmetry.

Ital J Anat Embryol 2016 ;121(1):66-76

The present investigation was designed to study the anatomy of the ethmoidal foramina in adult human dry skulls. In addition to investigate the number of ethmoidal foramina that can be found on the orbital wall, we also addressed their classification and symmetry. The analy- sis of 1089 orbits demonstrated that the average number of ethmoidal foramina/orbit was 2.07 (range 0 to 4). As for their classification, we devised the relative depth index (RDI) to differenti- ate the anterior from the posterior ethmoidal foramina. The index represents the ratio "distance of the foramen from the anterior lacrimal crest/length of the medial orbital wall". The average index of the anterior and posterior ethmoidal foramina were 0.53±0.04 and 0.84±0.06 respective- ly. As the mean of the two indexes was 0.685, we used the latter value as a sort of numerical watershed to define the domains of the anterior and of the posterior ethmoidal foramina on the orbital wall. Thus all ethmoidal foramina with an RDI : 0.68 were considered anterior ethmoi- dal foramina and all ethmoidal foramina with an RDI 0.69 were considered posterior ethmoi- dal foramina. In this way it is possible to properly classify foramina on orbits with 1,.3 or 4 ethmoidal foramina. As for their symmetry, in contrast to what had been previously reported, we observed that in most cases ethmoidal foramina have a highly symmetric arrangement both in terms of number of foramina on fellow orbits and of position along the orbital wall.

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January 2016
222 Reads
2 Citations

Effect of sitting, standing, and supine body positions on facial soft tissue: detailed 3D analysis.

Int J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2015 Oct 24;44(10):1309-16. Epub 2015 Jun 24.

Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Akdeniz University, Antalya, Turkey.

Medical imaging techniques require various body positions. Gravity causes changes in the facial soft tissue and acts in different directions according to the position of the head during imaging. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of positional changes on the facial soft tissue. The faces of subjects were scanned in the standing, sitting, and supine body positions. Differences in the positions were compared using the root mean square (RMS), mean absolute deviation (MAD), and mean signed distance (MSD). The displacement of 15 midsagittal and 20 bilateral landmarks was evaluated. The RMS, MAD, and MSD values of the sitting-standing comparison were significantly lower than those of the sitting-supine and standing-supine comparisons. There were no significant differences between the sitting-supine and standing-supine comparisons. Sixteen out of 135 measurements (12%) of the midsagittal landmarks and 94 out of 180 (52%) measurements of the bilateral landmarks showed significant displacements among the body positions. These results demonstrate a significant change in the facial soft tissue caused by body position. Furthermore, these data show the different susceptibilities of the facial soft tissue landmarks to the effect of body position along the x, y, and z axes.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijom.2015.06.005DOI Listing
October 2015
2 Reads
13 Citations
1.359 Impact Factor

Mechanism of the beneficial effect of melatonin in experimental Parkinson's disease.

Neurochem Int 2014 Dec 28;79:1-11. Epub 2014 Sep 28.

Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biochemistry, Akdeniz University, Antalya, Turkey.

This study aimed to elucidate locomotor activity changes in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induced Parkinson's disease (PD) and investigate the possible beneficial effects of melatonin on altered levels of locomotor activity, cyclooxygenase (COX), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-?B), nitrate/nitrite and apoptosis. Male Wistar rats were divided into five groups: vehicle (V), melatonin-treated (M), 6-OHDA-injected (6-OHDA), 6-OHDA-injected + melatonin-treated (6-OHDA-Mel) and melatonin treated + 6-OHDA-injected (Mel-6-OHDA). Melatonin was administered intraperitoneally at a dose of 10 mg/kg/day for 30 days in M and Mel-6-OHDA groups, for 7 days in 6-OHDA-Mel group. Experimental PD was created stereotactically via unilateral infusion of 6-OHDA into the medial forebrain bundle (MFB). The 6-OHDA-Mel group started receiving melatonin when experimental PD was created and treatment was continued for 7 days (post-treatment). In the Mel-6-OHDA group, experimental PD was created on the 23rd day of melatonin treatment and continued for the remaining 7 days (pre- and post-treatment). Locomotor activity performance decreased in 6-OHDA group compared with vehicle; however melatonin treatment did not improve this impairment. Nuclear factor kappa Bp65 and Bcl-2 levels were significantly decreased while COX, PGE2 and caspase-3 activity were significantly increased in 6-OHDA group. Melatonin treatment significantly decreased COX, PGE2 and caspase-3 activity, increased Bcl-2 and had no effect on NF-?B levels in experimental PD. 6-Hydroxydopamine injection caused an obvious reduction in TH positive dopaminergic neuron viability as determined by immunohistochemistry. Melatonin supplementation decreased dopaminergic neuron death in 6-OHDA-Mel and Mel-6-OHDA groups compared with 6-OHDA group. Melatonin also protected against 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis, as identified by increment in Bcl-2 levels in dopaminergic neurons. The protective effect of melatonin was more prominent for most parameter following 30 days treatment (pre- and post-) than 7 days post-treatment. In summary, melatonin treatment decreased dopaminergic neuron death in experimental PD model by increasing Bcl-2 protein level and decreasing caspase-3 activity.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuint.2014.09.005DOI Listing
December 2014
16 Reads
24 Citations
3.092 Impact Factor