Dipesh Rupakheti, PhD - Chinese Academy of Sciences - Postdoctoral researcher

Dipesh Rupakheti

PhD

Chinese Academy of Sciences

Postdoctoral researcher

Lanzhou, Gansu | China

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0001-5436-4086

Dipesh Rupakheti, PhD - Chinese Academy of Sciences - Postdoctoral researcher

Dipesh Rupakheti

PhD

Introduction

Primary Affiliation: Chinese Academy of Sciences - Lanzhou, Gansu , China

Research Interests:

Education

Jun 2017
University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, China
PhD
Jun 2017
Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China
PhD
Jun 2012
Asian Institute of Technology, Thailand
MSc

Publications

9Publications

131Reads

1Profile Views

Identification of absorbing aerosol types at a site in the northern edge of Indo-Gangetic Plain and a polluted valley in the foothills of the central Himalayas

Atmospheric Research

Identification of atmospheric aerosol types and characterization of absorbing aerosols, based on AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) data collected during 2013–2014 over two sites in Nepal: Lumbini in the northernmost part of central Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) and Kathmandu Valley in foothills of the central Himalayas, have been conducted in the present study. The relationship between four aerosol parameters; Extinction Angstrom Exponent (EAE), Absorption Angstrom Exponent (AAE), Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) and Real Refractive Index (RRI) was analyzed to study the aerosol types. This resulted in the identification of two types of aerosols concerning their origin: biomass burning and urban/industrial mix. Furthermore, to understand the absorbing aerosol types, the relationship between aerosol size parameters; Fine Mode Fraction (FMF) and Angstrom Exponent (AE), and aerosol absorption characteristics; SSA and AAE were investigated. In regards to the absorbing aerosol types, ‘Mostly BC’ was the dominant absorbing aerosol, over both sites, with comparatively negligible contribution from other absorbing aerosol types such as dust. The aerosol subtypes obtained from satellite-borne CALIPSO instrument supported the results derived from the AERONET data. The CALIPSO images also indicated that the aerosols over the foothills of the Himalayas could extend to the height of >5 km above the ground, which could be transported towards the Himalayan and Tibetan Plateau (HTP) region with sensitive ecosystems. The multi-sites based study of long-term records is required to elucidate the nature and trends of aerosols in the HTP region and any perturbation to the atmospheric environment and other environments in this region.

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July 2019
1 Read

Aerosol optical depth climatology over Central Asian countries based on Aqua-MODIS Collection 6.1 data: Aerosol variations and sources

Atmospheric Environment

The aim of this study is to explore the aerosol optical depth (AOD) – an indicator of air quality, based on satellite data over Central Asia. Due to limited studies and lack of knowledge regarding AOD variations over this region, five countries (Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan) and fifteen sites including the capital cities were selected for the analysis. Long-term Aqua-MODIS Collection 6.1 Deep Blue (DB) AOD observations at 10 km spatial resolution were obtained for 2002–2017 and the Ångström exponent (AE) was calculated using spectral AOD observations. AOD and AE were explored based on seasonal and inter-annual scale. The relationship between aerosol loading and economic indicator (gross domestic product) was also analyzed. Highest frequencies of low AOD and high AE were observed in all countries. Average AOD (AE) values during the study period were 0.17 ± 0.09 (1.29 ± 0.17) for Kazakhstan, 0.11 ± 0.13 (1.41 ± 0.13) for Kyrgyzstan, 0.17 ± 0.14 (1.36 ± 0.18) for Tajikistan, 0.20 ± 0.10 (1.10 ± 0.28) for Turkmenistan, and 0.18 ± 0.09 (1.18 ± 0.24) for Uzbekistan. Summer season experienced highest aerosol loading over Kazakhstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan, whereas spring season experienced highest aerosol loading over Kyrgyzstan and Turkmenistan possibly due to the influence of less precipitation and dust from the arid regions. All fifteen cities selected in this study exhibited increasing aerosol load. Aerosol types based on the relationship between AOD and AE were investigated, results suggested the clean continental aerosol as a major aerosol type over the region, whereas the contribution of mixed aerosols was observed during spring and summer seasons. This study suggests for establishment of ground-based aerosol monitoring stations network and inclusions of modeling works to understand the complex nature of aerosol over this vast landmass.

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June 2019
2 Reads

Bibliometric analysis of global research on air pollution and human health: 1998-2017.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2019 May 21;26(13):13103-13114. Epub 2019 Mar 21.

State Key Laboratory of Cryospheric Science, Northwest Institute of Eco-Environment and Resources, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, 730000, China.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-019-04482-xDOI Listing
May 2019
2 Reads
2.828 Impact Factor

Historical Black Carbon Reconstruction from the Lake Sediments of the Himalayan-Tibetan Plateau.

Environ Sci Technol 2019 05 29;53(10):5641-5651. Epub 2019 Apr 29.

State Key Laboratory of Cryospheric Science, Northwest Institute of Eco-Environment and Resources , Chinese Academy of Sciences , Lanzhou 730000 , China.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.8b07025DOI Listing
May 2019
4 Reads
5.330 Impact Factor

Indoor levels of black carbon and particulate matters in relation to cooking activities using different cook stove-fuels in rural Nepal

Energy for Sustainable Development

In Nepal, majority of households still burn solid fuels in inefficient cook stoves inside poorly ventilated kitchens, which results in very high levels of indoor pollutants, including black carbon (BC). Previous studies have not yet reported BC concentrations in typical kitchen configurations in rural Nepal. In this study, fine particulate matter (PM) and BC concentrations were monitored continuously inside two types of kitchens (separated from and attached to the main house) under actual cooking practices. Prior to monitoring of pollutants, a field survey was conducted to gain insight into the types of kitchens, cook stoves and fuels used. Indoor PM and BC concentrations were monitored using biomass fuels in traditional cook stoves (TC) and improved cook stoves (ICS). Clear diurnal variations of the pollutants were observed in both kitchens, with the highest concentrations during cooking times. BC and PM concentrations during cooking and non-cooking periods demonstrated clear reductions in the concentrations during non-cooking periods. It was observed that the concentrations rose steeply during the first half hour of cooking, then decreased slightly and finally leveled off to the non-cooking period concentrations. 24-hour average indoor PM concentrations in both kitchens frequently exceeded Nepal's indoor air quality standards and the WHO PM2.5 guidelines, by a factor of ~8 to ~28. We found that the specific type of ICS used in this study, a commonly used ICS in Nepal and other developing countries might help in PM emission reductions but not necessarily BC emission reduction.

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February 2019
1 Read

Observation of optical properties and sources of aerosols at Buddha's birthplace, Lumbini, Nepal: environmental implications.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2018 May 15;25(15):14868-14881. Epub 2018 Mar 15.

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-018-1713-zDOI Listing
May 2018
7 Reads
2.828 Impact Factor

Chemical characteristics of soluble aerosols over the central Himalayas: insights into spatiotemporal variations and sources.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2017 Nov 12;24(31):24454-24472. Epub 2017 Sep 12.

Key Laboratory of Tibetan Environment Changes and Land Surface Processes, Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese, Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100101, China.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-017-0077-0DOI Listing
November 2017
74 Reads
2.828 Impact Factor

Characterizations of atmospheric particulate-bound mercury in the Kathmandu Valley of Nepal, South Asia.

Sci Total Environ 2017 Feb 30;579:1240-1248. Epub 2016 Nov 30.

State Key Laboratory of Cryospheric Sciences, Northwest Institute of Eco-Environment and Resources, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000, China; Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039, China.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.11.110DOI Listing
February 2017
21 Reads
4.099 Impact Factor

Preliminary Health Risk Assessment of Potentially Toxic Metals in Surface Water of the Himalayan Rivers, Nepal.

Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 2016 Dec 12;97(6):855-862. Epub 2016 Oct 12.

Laboratory of Green Chemistry, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Sammonkatu 12, 50130, Mikkeli, Finland.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00128-016-1945-xDOI Listing
December 2016
23 Reads
1.255 Impact Factor