Publications by authors named "Zrinka Čolak Romić"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Paroxismal non-kinesigenic dyskinesia and hemidystonia associated with silent celiac disease.

Clin Neurol Neurosurg 2020 01 4;188:105586. Epub 2019 Nov 4.

Department of Neurology, University Hospital Dubrava, Avenija Gojka Šuška 6, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia.

Paroxismal non-kinesigenic dyskinesia (PNKD) is a rare movement disorder manifesting as choreatic/dystonic movements, usually lasting from minutes to up to 4 h, with perserved consciousness during attacks. Primary PNKD are idiopathic or genetic disorders while secondary PNKD are associated with various neurologic and medical conditions. We present a case with PNKD and right sided hemidystonia in association with celiac disease, responsive to gluten-free diet, not previously reported in available literature. In conclusion, diagnostic tests for celiac disease should be a part of etiological investigations in patients with otherwise unexplained movement disorders including PKND. Gluten free diet could produce a favorable clinical response in those patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clineuro.2019.105586DOI Listing
January 2020

Intracranial Mature Teratoma in an Adult Patient: A Case Report.

J Neurol Surg Rep 2019 Jan 3;80(1):e14-e17. Epub 2019 Apr 3.

Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital Dubrava, Zagreb, Croatia.

: Primary intracranial teratoma is a subtype of germ cell tumors, classified into three subtypes. They occur very rarely, with only several reported individual cases in adults.  We present a patient with an intermittent headache in the right frontal region. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a right sided high frontal parasagittal mass that compressed the falx, the right lateral ventricle, as well as the brain parenchyma. Patient underwent surgical treatment. Histopathological analysis described mature teratoma. Four months after the surgical treatment there were no signs of residual intracranial mass or relapse.  Primary intracranial teratoma in adults has a nonspecific clinical presentation. MRI reveals a solitary irregular mass with multilocularity and mixed signals derived from different tissues. The patients age, biochemical markers, and patohistological analysis are necessary to confirm the diagnosis.  Teratoma treatment strategy still remains controversial. It includes radical resection whenever possible. Since the residual portion of mature teratoma may contain part of immature or malignant tissue, tumor recurrence after surgical removal is possible. Also, new tumor mass could occur at other sites intracranial after the initial one was removed. Thus, although patients usually recover, they should be followed-up for a long period of time.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0039-1685213DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6447400PMC
January 2019