Publications by authors named "Zola N"

3 Publications

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Virtual reality in Metaverse for future mental health-helping profession: an alternative solution to the mental health challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic.

J Public Health (Oxf) 2022 Apr 25. Epub 2022 Apr 25.

Indonesian Institute for Counseling, Education, and Therapy, Padang, West Sumatera, Indonesia.

Currently, Metaverse has become a hot topic of conversation everywhere. Therefore, this can also be an accurate solution to the mental health challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic. Hopefully in the future, mental health workers can make the best use of it.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/pubmed/fdac049DOI Listing
April 2022

Online mental health services in Indonesia during the COVID-19 outbreak.

Asian J Psychiatr 2020 Jun 5;51:102153. Epub 2020 May 5.

Department of Guidance and Counseling, Faculty of Education, Univeritas Negeri Padang, West Sumatera, Indonesia. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajp.2020.102153DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7199669PMC
June 2020

[Impact of seasons, years El Nino/La Nina and rainfalls on stroke-related morbidity and mortality in Kinshasa].

J Mal Vasc 2016 Feb 27;41(1):4-11. Epub 2016 Jan 27.

Risk and Vulnerability Assessment Centre, Walter Sisulu University, Mthatha, Afrique du Sud.

Introduction: The significant impact of seasonality and climate change on stroke-related morbidity and mortality is well established, however, some findings on this issue are conflicting. The objective was to determine the impact of gender, age, season, year of admission, temperature, rainfall and El Nino phenomenon on ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes and fatal cases of stroke.

Methods: The study was carried out at the teaching hospital of Kinshasa, DRC, between January 1998 and December 2004. Rainy and dry seasons, elevated temperatures, indices of rainfalls El Nino years 1998, 2002 and 2004, but La Nina years 1999-2000 and neutral/normal years 2001 and 2003 were defined.

Results: Among 470 incident strokes, 34.5% of victims (n=162) died. Traditional seasons (small dry season, small rainy season, great dry season, great rainy season) and temperatures did not significantly (P>0.005) impact on stroke incidence. However, there was a positive association between the decrease in rainfall, El Nino, and incident ischemic strokes, but a significant positive association between the increase in rainfall, La Nina, and incident hemorrhagic strokes. Using logistic regression analysis, age ≥ 60 years (OR: 1.7, 95% CI: 1.2-2.5; P=0.018) and El Nino years (OR: 2, 95% CI: 1.2-3.3; P=0.009) were identified as the independent predictors of fatal strokes.

Conclusion: Early warning systems should be developed to predict the impact of seasons and climate variability on stroke morbidity and mortality.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmv.2015.12.002DOI Listing
February 2016
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