Publications by authors named "Zohreh Vahidi"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Planning and management to control and eliminate HTLV-1 infection in Iran.

Iran J Basic Med Sci 2021 Mar;24(3):264-266

Immunology Research Centre, Inflammation and Inflammatory Diseases Division, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.

Prevention and treatment of the Human T-cell leukemia virus, type 1 (HTLV-1) which was discovered nearly 40 years ago, still remain challenging. The reported high prevalence of HTLV-1 in some countries around the world triggered an open letter to the World Health Organization (WHO), urging action against HTLV-1 infection in 2018. This highlights the importance of virus elimination strategies to eradicate HTLV-1 infection. In Iran, we have documented our experiences with the virus in order to achieve and promote the possible ways to manage, control, and eliminate HTLV-1. Although there has been considerable progress apropos of HTLV-1, a series of additional challenges need to be tackled to control HTLV-1 infection in Iran.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.22038/ijbms.2021.50803.11562DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8087857PMC
March 2021

Evaluation of iron, ferritin, copper, and ceruloplasmin along with proviral load in human T lymphotropic virus type 1-associated myelopathy.

J Neurovirol 2021 Apr 20. Epub 2021 Apr 20.

Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Qaem Hospital, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Ahmadabad Avenue, 91766-99199, Mashhad, Iran.

Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection can cause HTLV-I-associated myelopathy (HAM). In this study, we evaluated the levels of serum iron, ferritin, copper, and ceruloplasmin, and their correlations with HTLV-1 proviral load (PVL) and standard indices of HAM severity. In total, 114 subjects were recruited in this cross sectional study in Qaem Hospital, Mashhad, Iran between 2017 and 2018, including 36 HAM and 32 asymptomatic cases (ACs) and 46 healthy people (HSs). The clinical examination and evaluation of serum levels of biochemical factors and proviral load were performed. The PVL in HAM and ACs were 1835.49 ± 382.81 and 280.97 ± 67.41 copies/10 PBMCs, which statistically differed. Significant differences were also observed in plasma levels of iron, copper, and ceruloplasmin, among the three groups, while ferritin level was not considerably different. For HAM severity, the mean Osame motor disability scale (OMDS) and overactive bladder-validated-8-questionnaire (OABV-8) scores were 4.97 ± 0.38 and 15.75 ± 0.83, respectively, that had no significant correlations with the biochemical variables. Even though the studied elements in HAM group did not affect the severity of the disease, the levels of copper and ceruloplasmin might be determinants of the development and progression of HAM, as they are shown to play role in progression of other neurological diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13365-021-00961-5DOI Listing
April 2021

Dietary Intake and Serum Selenium Levels Influence the Outcome of HTLV-1 Infection.

Biol Trace Elem Res 2021 Sep 9;199(9):3242-3252. Epub 2020 Nov 9.

Immunology Research Center, Inflammation and Inflammatory Diseases Division, Medical School, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.

Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), as the most common neurological emersion related to HTLV-1, is a debilitating and lifelong treating disease with no definitive treatment. Furthermore, it has been determined that dietary compositions (inflammatory and anti-inflammatory) and some micronutrients (such as vitamin D and selenium) have an effect on inflammatory and immune processes and with this background; the study was done to compare the nutritional status between age- and sex-matched with infected and non-infected HTLV-1. In a multi-center setting, 70 healthy controls (HCs), 35 asymptomatic carriers (ACs), and 35 HAM/TSP patients were recruited in the HTLV-1 Foundation, Ghaem Hospital, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran. Nutritional status including anthropometric indices, dietary (micro- and macronutrient) intake, and serum vitamin D, vitamin B12, zinc, and selenium were measured. In anthropometric indices, mean waist circumference (WC) in the carrier group was significantly higher than the patient and the control groups (p = 0.008). In the dietary intake, the patient group received less energy, protein, mono-unsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), and oleic, but more fat than the HTLV-1 carrier and control groups, and these differences were remarkable in three groups (p = 0.002, 0.005, 0.001, 0.01, and 0.001, respectively), whereas the carrier group received more saturated fatty acid and less poly-unsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), linoleic, and linolenic than patient and control groups with a different significant (p = 0.01, 0.007, 0.005, and 0.006, respectively) in three groups. In micronutrient intake, although selenium, zinc, and vitamins B12 and D were lower in the patient group than the carrier and control group, however, no significant differences were observed. In comparison with micronutrient serum concentrations, vitamins B12 and D and selenium in the patient group were lower than the carrier and control groups, but statistically, the considerable difference was found only in the selenium concentration (p = 0.001). The study showed that there were differences in dietary intake (including energy, macronutrients, and fatty acids), WC, and selenium serum levels between HAM/TSP patients and HTLV-1 carriers, suggesting that nutritional statues influence the inflammatory immune response in HTLV-1 infection.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12011-020-02472-6DOI Listing
September 2021

The Role of Chemokines in the Pathogenesis of HTLV-1.

Front Microbiol 2020 13;11:421. Epub 2020 Mar 13.

Immunology Research Center, Inflammation and Inflammatory Diseases Division, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.

Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a human retrovirus that is associated with two main diseases: HTLV-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) and adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL). Chemokines are highly specialized groups of cytokines that play important roles in organizing, trafficking, homing, and in the migration of immune cells to the bone marrow, lymphoid organs and sites of infection and inflammation. Aberrant expression or function of chemokines, or their receptors, has been linked to the protection against or susceptibility to specific infectious diseases, as well as increased the risk of autoimmune diseases and malignancy. Chemokines and their receptors participate in pathogenesis of HTLV-1 associated diseases from inflammation in the central nervous system (CNS) which occurs in cases of HAM/TSP to T cell immortalization and tissue infiltration observed in ATL patients. Chemokines represent viable effective prognostic biomarkers for HTLV-1-associated diseases which provide the early identification of high-risk, treatment possibilities and high-yielding clinical trials. This review focuses on the emerging roles of these molecules in the outcome of HTLV-1-associated diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2020.00421DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7083101PMC
March 2020

International multicenter randomized, placebo-controlled phase III clinical trial of β-D-mannuronic acid in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

Inflammopharmacology 2019 Oct 2;27(5):911-921. Epub 2019 Jan 2.

Department of Immunology, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Box: 14155-6446, Tehran, Iran.

Background: The oral administration of drug β-D-mannuronic acid (M2000) showed a potent therapeutic effect in phase I/II study in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Here, our aim is to assess the efficacy and safety of this new drug in RA patients under a multinational, randomized placebo-controlled phase III clinical trial.

Method: Patients (n = 288) with active disease at baseline and inadequate response to conventional drugs were randomly allocated to three groups; (1) receiving mannuronic acid at a dose of two capsules (500 mg) per day orally for 12 weeks, (2) placebo-controlled, and (3) conventional. The primary endpoints were the America College of Rheumatology 20 response (ACR20), 28-joint disease activity score (DAS28) and Modified Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (M-HAQ-DI). In addition, the participants were followed-up for safety assessment.

Results: In this phase III trial, after 12 weeks of treatment, there was a significant reduction in ACR20 between mannuronic-treated patients compared to placebo and conventional groups. Moreover, there was a similar significant improvement for DAS28 following mannuronic therapy. The statistical analysis showed a significant reduction in the swollen and tender joint count in mannuronic-treated patients compared with the placebo group. On the other side, mannuronic acid showed no-to-very low adverse events in comparison to placebo.

Conclusion: The results of this multinational, phase III clinical trial provided a potent evidence base for the use of β-D-mannuronic acid as a new highly safe and efficient drug in the treatment of RA.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10787-018-00557-2DOI Listing
October 2019