Publications by authors named "Zineb Boumart"

11 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Draft Genome Sequence of Pasteurella multocida Serotype A Strain MOR19, Isolated in Morocco.

Microbiol Resour Announc 2021 Oct 14;10(41):e0086721. Epub 2021 Oct 14.

Research and Development Department, Multi-Chemical Industry, Mohammedia, Morocco.

Pasteurella multocida causes pneumonia in large ruminants. In this study, we determined the genome sequence of the capsular serotype A Pasteurella multocida strain MOR19, isolated from a calf that died from acute pneumonia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/MRA.00867-21DOI Listing
October 2021

Biological and molecular characterization of a sheep pathogen isolate of and leukotoxin production kinetics.

Vet World 2021 Aug 7;14(8):2031-2040. Epub 2021 Aug 7.

Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Contagious Diseases, Institute of Agronomy and Veterinary Medicine Hassan II, Rabat, Morocco.

Background And Aim: (Mha) is a common agent of pneumonia in ruminants globally, causing economic losses by morbidity, mortality, and treatment costs. Infection by Mha is often associated with or promoted by respiratory viral pathogens and environmental conditions. Infections due to Mha have rarely been described in small ruminants. This study reports the biological and molecular characteristics of a new Moroccan Mha isolate from small ruminants presenting typical respiratory symptoms. We also studied the cultural parameters, growth kinetics, and Lkt excretion of the isolate and its pathogenicity on laboratory animals and small ruminants.

Materials And Methods: Suspected pasteurellosis cases in sheep and goat flocks in Morocco were investigated. A local strain of Mha was isolated and identified using biochemical and molecular methods. Polymerase chain reaction-targeting specific genes were used for serotyping and phylogenetic analyses; further, leukotoxin production, cytotoxicity, and pathogenicity of the isolate in mice, goats, and sheep were investigated.

Results: Phylogeny analysis revealed 98.76% sequence identity with the USA isolate of 2013; the strain growth with a cycle of 9-10 h with leukotoxin secretion was detected by NETosis and quantified by cytotoxicity and mortality of mice. Goat and sheep infections cause hyperthermia, with characteristic postmortem lesions in the trachea and lung.

Conclusion: A local isolate of Mha from sheep that died of pneumonia was characterized for the 1 time in North Africa using biological and molecular methods. Although growth on appropriate culture media is accompanied by intense leukotoxin secretion, experimental infections of sheep and goats cause hyperthermia and typical lesions of pneumonia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.14202/vetworld.2021.2031-2040DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8448628PMC
August 2021

Experimental evaluation of the cross-protection between Sheeppox and bovine Lumpy skin vaccines.

Sci Rep 2020 06 1;10(1):8888. Epub 2020 Jun 1.

Research and Development Virology, Multi-Chemical Industry, Lot. 157, Z I, Sud-Ouest (ERAC) B.P.: 278, Mohammedia, 28810, Morocco.

The Capripoxvirus genus includes three agents: Sheeppox virus, Goatpox virus and Lumpy skin disease virus. Related diseases are of economic importance and present a major constraint to animals and animal products trade in addition to mortality and morbidity. Attenuated vaccines against these diseases are available, but afforded cross-protection is controversial in each specie. In this study, groups of sheep, goats and cattle were vaccinated with Romania SPPV vaccine and challenged with corresponding virulent strains. Sheep and cattle were also vaccinated with Neethling LSDV vaccine and challenged with both virulent SPPV and LSDV strains. Animals were monitored by clinical observation, rectal temperature as well as serological response. The study showed that sheep and goats vaccinated with Romania SPPV vaccine were fully protected against challenge with virulent SPPV and GTPV strains, respectively. However, small ruminants vaccinated with LSDV Neethling vaccine showed only partial protection against challenge with virulent SPPV strain. Cattle showed also only partial protection when vaccinated with Romania SPPV and were fully protected with Neethling LSDV vaccine. This study showed that SPPV and GTPV vaccines are closely related with cross-protection, while LSDV protects only cattle against the corresponding disease, which suggests that vaccination against LSDV should be carried out with homologous strain.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-65856-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7264126PMC
June 2020

Development and Evaluation of an Inactivated Lumpy Skin Disease Vaccine for Cattle.

Vet Microbiol 2020 Jun 18;245:108689. Epub 2020 Apr 18.

Research and development Virology, Multi-Chemical Industry, Lot. 157, ZI Sud-Ouest (ERAC) B.P: 278, Mohammedia 28810, Morocco.

Lumpy skin disease (LSD) of cattle is caused by a virus within Capripoxvirus genus. It leads to huge economic losses in addition to trade and animal movement limitation. Vaccination is the only economically feasible way to control this vector-borne disease. Only live attenuated vaccines have been used so far and no inactivated vaccine has been developed nor tested in cattle. In this study, we developed an inactivated oily adjuvanted vaccine based on Neethling strain and tested it on cattle. Selected criteria of appreciation were safety, antibody response by Virus Neutralization and protection through challenge. A field trial was also performed in Bulgaria. The vaccine was safe and did not cause any adverse reaction, high level of specific antibodies was obtained starting from day 7 post-vaccination and protection against virulent challenge strain that caused typical disease in control animals was total. Induced protection was similar to that obtained with live vaccine, without any adverse effect. In addition, the field study confirmed safety and efficacy of the vaccine, which did not show any adverse reaction and induced a high level of antibodies for up to one year. General prophylaxis based on inactivated vaccine could be of great benefit in endemic countries or at risk regions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vetmic.2020.108689DOI Listing
June 2020

Pathogenicity and Full Genome Sequencing of the Avian Influenza H9N2 Moroccan Isolate 2016.

Avian Dis 2019 03;63(1):24-30

Research and Development Department, Multi-Chemical Industry, Lot 157, Z I, Sud-Ouest (ERAC) B. P. 278, Mohammedia 28810, Morocco.

In Morocco in early 2016, a low pathogenic avian influenza virus serotype H9N2 caused large economic losses to the poultry industry, with specific clinical symptoms and high mortality rates on infected farms. Subsequent to the H9N2 outbreak, the causal agent was successfully isolated from chicken flocks with high morbidity and mortality rates, propagated on embryonated eggs, and fully sequenced. The phylogenetic analysis suggested that the Moroccan isolate could have derived from the Middle East isolate A/chicken/Dubai/D2506.A/2015. This study was designed to assess the pathogenicity of the Moroccan isolate H9N2 in experimentally infected broiler and specific-pathogen-free (SPF) chickens. At 22 days of age, one broiler and two SPF chicken groups were inoculated by dropping 0.2 ml of the H9N2 isolate (10 EID/ml) in both nostrils and eyes. Clinically inoculated chickens with H9N2 displayed mild lesions, low mortality rates, and an absence of clinical signs. The H9N2 virus was more pathogenic in broiler chickens and produced more severe tissue lesions compared to SPF chickens. The viral shedding was detected up to 6 days postinoculation (pi) in oropharyngeal and cloacal swabs in infected birds with a maximum shedding in the oropharynges of the broiler group. All experimental chickens seroconverted and registered high hemagglutination inhibition titers as early as day 7 pi. The present study indicates that the H9N2 virus isolated from a natural outbreak was of low pathogenicity under experimental conditions. However, under field conditions infection with other pathogens might have aggravated the disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1637/11941-080418-Reg.1DOI Listing
March 2019

Susceptibility of Moroccan sheep and goat breeds to peste des petits ruminants virus.

Acta Vet Scand 2017 Sep 7;59(1):56. Epub 2017 Sep 7.

Research and Development, MCI Santé Animale, Lot. 157, Z I, Sud-Ouest (ERAC), B.P. 278, 28810, Mohammedia, Morocco.

Background: Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is a highly contagious viral disease of small ruminants in Asia and Africa. In 2008, a PPR outbreak was reported for the first time in Morocco and a mass vaccination campaign allowed control of the disease. In this study, the susceptibility of four Moroccan local breeds of small ruminants to PPR virus was investigated by experimental infections. The objective was to make recommendations for improved epidemiological surveillance in Morocco by evaluating the susceptibility of the dominant Moroccan small ruminant breeds. Three parameters were studied: hyperthermia, clinical scoring and virus excretion. The outcome was compared to Alpine goats, which are considered one of the most sensitive breeds.

Results: The study showed that the local goat breed was the most sensitive breed with a susceptibility rate of 67%, followed by Timahdit, Beni Guil and Sardi sheep with 48, 29 and 26%, respectively. Serological testing including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and viral neutralization showed that the Timahdit breed developed a stronger antibody response compared to the other breeds. Although the clinical signs observed in the sheep were mild, evidence of viral excretion was detected by means of a polymerase chain reaction assay.

Conclusions: It is recommended that effective surveillance should focus on susceptible breeds complemented with serological surveillance of the sheep population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13028-017-0323-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5590148PMC
September 2017

Thermal Stability Study of Five Newcastle Disease Attenuated Vaccine Strains.

Avian Dis 2016 12;60(4):779-783

Research and Development Department, Multi-Chemical Industry, Lot. 157, Z I, Sud-Ouest (ERAC) B.P.: 278, Mohammedia 28810, Morocco.

Newcastle disease (ND) is a big concern throughout the world because of the devastating losses that can occur with commercial and backyard poultry. The major problem in many countries is the loss of the vaccine's effectiveness due to inadequate use or storage conditions, particularly in hot climates. In the present study, stability of the five, most-used NDV vaccine strains (I-2, LaSota, B1, Clone 30 [C30], and VG-GA) was tested comparatively at different storage temperatures (4 and 37 C for the freeze-dried form and 4, 24, 37, and 45 C for the freeze-dried vaccine reconstituted in diluents). The vaccine stability was evaluated by the cumulative infectious titer drop and the theoretical shelf life at particular temperatures. Results showed that I-2 and LaSota are the most stable vaccine strains compared to B1, C30, and VG-GA; they registered the lowest titer drops and the longest shelf life whether at cool, high, or room temperatures and for both freeze-dried and reconstituted vaccines.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1637/11426-042116-Reg.1DOI Listing
December 2016

Comparative innocuity and efficacy of live and inactivated sheeppox vaccines.

BMC Vet Res 2016 Jun 29;12(1):133. Epub 2016 Jun 29.

Research and Development Virology, Multi-Chemical Industry, Lot. 157, Z I, Sud-Ouest (ERAC) B.P.: 278, Mohammedia, 28810, Morocco.

Background: Sheeppox (SPP) is one of the priorities, high-impact animal diseases in many developing countries, where live attenuated vaccines are routinely used against sheeppox virus (SPPV). In an event of an SPP outbreak, historically disease-free countries would hesitate to use of live vaccines against SPPVdue to the safety and trade reasons. Currently no killed SPPV vaccines are commercially available. In this study, we developed an inactivated Romanian SPPVvaccine and assessed its efficacy and potency in comparison with a live attenuated Romanian SPPV vaccine. Four naïve sheep were vaccinated once with the Romanian SPPV live attenuated vaccine and16 sheep were vaccinated twice with the inactivated vaccine. All sheep in the live vaccine group were included in the challenge trial, which was conducted using a highly virulent Moroccan SPPV field strain. Eight sheep of the inactivated vaccine group were challenged and the remaining sheep were monitored for seroconversion. Experimental animals were closely monitored for the appearance of clinical signs, body temperature and inflammation at the injection site. Two naïve sheep were used as unvaccinated controls.

Results: The inactivated Romanian SPPV vaccine was found to be safe and confer a good protection, similar to the live vaccine. Specific antibodies appeared from seven days post vaccination and remained up to nine months.

Conclusion: This study showed that the developed inactivated Romanian SPPV vaccine has a potential to replace attenuated vaccine to control and prevent sheep pox in disease-free or endemic countries.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12917-016-0754-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4928353PMC
June 2016

Multiple invasion mechanisms and different intracellular Behaviors: a new vision of Salmonella-host cell interaction.

FEMS Microbiol Lett 2014 12 8;361(1):1-7. Epub 2015 Jan 8.

Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, UMR1282 Infectiologie et Santé Publique, Nouzilly, France

Salmonella is a facultative intracellular bacterium found within a variety of phagocytic and nonphagocytic cells in vitro and in vivo For decades, it has been accepted that Salmonella can enter cells only through a Trigger mechanism mediated by a type three secretion system, called T3SS-1. However, recent researches have shown that this bacterium can use other invasion pathways mediating either Trigger or Zipper entry processes. Following eukaryotic cell invasion, Salmonella has to ensure its survival and proliferation within host cells. To do so, this bacterium resides either within a membrane-bound vacuole or freely within host cell cytosol. It is not clear why Salmonella has developed these alternate mechanisms for cell invasion and proliferation, but this provides a new insight into the mechanisms leading to Salmonella-induced diseases. Thus, the aim of this review is to show the evolution of Salmonella-host cell interaction paradigms by summarizing the different strategies used by Salmonella serotypes to invade and proliferate into eukaryotic cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1574-6968.12614DOI Listing
December 2014

Heterogeneity of persistence of Salmonella enterica serotype Senftenberg strains could explain the emergence of this serotype in poultry flocks.

PLoS One 2012 24;7(4):e35782. Epub 2012 Apr 24.

INRA, UR1282 Infectiologie Animale et Santé Publique, Nouzilly, France.

Salmonella enterica serotype Senftenberg (S. Senftenberg) has recently become more frequent in poultry flocks. Moreover some strains have been implicated in severe clinical cases. To explain the causes of this emergence in farm animals, 134 S. Senftenberg isolates from hatcheries, poultry farms and human clinical cases were analyzed. Persistent and non-persistent strains were identified in chicks. The non-persistent strains disappeared from ceca a few weeks post inoculation. This lack of persistence could be related to the disappearance of this serotype from poultry farms in the past. In contrast, persistent S. Senftenberg strains induced an intestinal asymptomatic carrier state in chicks similar to S. Enteritidis, but a weaker systemic infection than S. Enteritidis in chicks and mice. An in vitro analysis showed that the low infectivity of S. Senftenberg is in part related to its low capacity to invade enterocytes and thus to translocate the intestinal barrier. The higher capacity of persistent than non-persistent strains to colonize and persist in the ceca of chickens could explain the increased persistence of S. Senftenberg in poultry flocks. This trait might thus present a human health risk as these bacteria could be present in animals before slaughter and during food processing.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0035782PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3335784PMC
August 2012

Genome sequence of the persistent Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Senftenberg strain SS209.

J Bacteriol 2012 May;194(9):2385-6

INRA, UMR1282 Infectiologie et Santé Publique, Nouzilly, France.

Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Senftenberg is an emerging serotype in poultry production which has been found to persist in animals and the farm environment. We report the genome sequence and annotation of the SS209 strain of S. Senftenberg, isolated from a hatchery, which was identified as persistent in broiler chickens.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JB.00255-12DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3347087PMC
May 2012
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