Publications by authors named "Zihao Zheng"

15 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Metal-Free B, N co-Doped Hierarchical Porous Carbon Electrocatalyst with an Excellent O Reduction Performance.

ChemistryOpen 2021 Jul;10(7):713-719

College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Collaborative Innovation Center of Functionalized Probes for Chemical Imaging in Universities of Shandong, Key Laboratory of Molecular and Nano Probes, Ministry of Education, Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Clean Production of Fine Chemicals, Shandong Normal University, Jinan, 250014, China.

Fuel cells have attracted increasing attention due to their low cost, high energy density, low environmental pollution, and abundant raw materials. Oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is a core technology of fuel cells, and the development of new electrocatalysts with high ORR performance is highly desirable. Herein, we synthesize a series of B, N co-doped hierarchical porous carbons using a soft template method with the integration of self-assembly, calcination and etching. The obtained materials exhibit hierarchical porous structures, controllable pore distribution, partial graphite structures, and B, N co-doping. They can function as the cost-effective and metal-free electrocatalysts, facilitating the diffusion of electrolyte ions and the improvement of ORR performance. Especially, the B, N co-doped porous carbon with the B-to-N molar ratio of 5 (BNC-5) displays a high ORR activity with a half-wave potential (E ) of 0.73 V, an onset potential (E ) of 0.94 V, and a high limiting current density (J ) of 5.98 mA cm , superior to the N-doped C (NC) and BNC-1 (the B-to-N molar ratio=1), BNC-3 (the B-to-N molar ratio=3) and BNC-7 (the B-to-N molar ratio=7) under the identical conditions. Moreover, the BNC-5 exhibits good cycling stability after 5000 cyclic voltammetry (CV) cycles and excellent tolerance toward even 3 M methanol. This research provides a new approach for the facile synthesis of dual element-doped carbon electrocatalysts with high ORR performance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/open.202100090DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8312485PMC
July 2021

Effects of Morning Blue-Green 500 nm Light Therapy on Cognition and Biomarkers in Middle-Aged and Older Adults with Subjective Cognitive Decline and Mild Cognitive Impairment: Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial.

J Alzheimers Dis 2021 Apr 3. Epub 2021 Apr 3.

The Clinical Hospital of Chengdu Brain Science Institute, MOE Key Lab for Neuroinformation, School of Life Science and Technology, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, China.

Background: Given that there is no specific drug to treat Alzheimer's disease, non-pharmacologic interventions in people with subjective cognitive decline (SCD) and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) are one of the most important treatment strategies.

Objective: To clarify the efficacy of blue-green (500 nm) light therapy on sleep, mood, and physiological parameters in patients with SCD and aMCI is an interesting avenue to explore.

Methods: This is a monocentric, randomized, and controlled trial that will last for 4 weeks. We will recruit 150 individuals aged 45 years or older from memory clinics and divide them into 5 groups: SCD treatment (n = 30), SCD control (n = 30), aMCI treatment (n = 30), aMCI control (n = 30), and a group of healthy adult subjects (n = 30) as a normal control (NC).

Results: The primary outcome is the change in subjective and objective cognitive performance between baseline and postintervention visits (4 weeks after baseline). Secondary outcomes include changes in performance assessing from baseline, postintervention to follow-up (3 months after the intervention), as well as sleep, mood, and physiological parameters (including blood, urine, electrophysiology, and neuroimaging biomarkers).

Conclusion: This study aims to provide evidence of the impact of light therapy on subjective and objective cognitive performance in middle-aged and older adults with SCD or aMCI. In addition, we will identify possible neurophysiological mechanisms of action underlying light therapy. Overall, this trial will contribute to the establishment of light therapy in the prevention of Alzheimer's disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/JAD-201560DOI Listing
April 2021

Using nighttime light data to identify the structure of polycentric cities and evaluate urban centers.

Sci Total Environ 2021 Aug 19;780:146586. Epub 2021 Mar 19.

School of Geography and Remote Sensing, Guangzhou University, Guangzhou 510006, China; Southern Marine Science and Engineering Guangdong Laboratory (Guangzhou), Guangzhou 511458, China. Electronic address:

Studying the structure of polycentric cities promotes a better understanding of the process of urban development and contributes to urban planning and management. However, existing studies cannot compare the level differences between urban centers and quantify the overall urban center development level within polycentric cities. Therefore, we combined nighttime light (NTL) data and the natural city (NC) to conduct this study from multiple perspectives. First, NCs were determined from Luojia-1A NTL data with high spatial resolution. Second, urban centers were selected from NCs. Third, urban center level (UCL) was proposed to compare the level differences of urban centers. Fourth, urban center development index (UCDI) was proposed to quantify the overall urban center development level within a polycentric city. A quantitative verification method was used to confirm that the detection accuracy of urban center identification is high. Furthermore, the applicability of the proposed method in different NTL datasets was verified by the identification of urban centers and the calculation of UCDIs. Unlike traditional methods, the shape and scope of the urban center identified using the proposed method are not restricted by administrative boundaries. Moreover, the level differences of urban centers and the overall urban center development level within a polycentric city, can be expressed by quantitative indicators, which helps in comparing the differences between urban centers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2021.146586DOI Listing
August 2021

MixTwice: large-scale hypothesis testing for peptide arrays by variance mixing.

Bioinformatics 2021 Mar 8. Epub 2021 Mar 8.

Department of Statistics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, USA.

Peptide microarrays have emerged as a powerful technology in immunoproteomics as they provide a tool to measure the abundance of different antibodies in patient serum samples. The high dimensionality and small sample size of many experiments challenge conventional statistical approaches, including those aiming to control the false discovery rate (FDR). Motivated by limitations in reproducibility and power of current methods, we advance an empirical Bayesian tool that computes local false discovery rate statistics and local false sign rate statistics when provided with data on estimated effects and estimated standard errors from all the measured peptides. As the name suggests, the MixTwice tool involves the estimation of two mixing distributions, one on underlying effects and one on underlying variance parameters. Constrained optimization techniques provide for model fitting of mixing distributions under weak shape constraints (unimodality of the effect distribution). Numerical experiments show that MixTwice can accurately estimate generative parameters and powerfully identify non-null peptides. In a peptide array study of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), MixTwice recovers meaningful peptide markers in one case where the signal is weak, and has strong reproducibility properties in one case where the signal is strong. Availability MixTwice is available as an R software package https://cran.rproject. org/web/packages/MixTwice/ Supplementary information Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/bioinformatics/btab162DOI Listing
March 2021

Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) in the detection of intraoperative cardiac arrest: A case report.

Medicine (Baltimore) 2020 May;99(18):e19928

Department of Anesthesiology, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan.

Rationale: Point-of-care ultrasound is widely used in patients with cardiac arrest, allowing for diagnosing, monitoring, and prognostication as well as assessing the effectiveness of the chest compressions. However, the detection of intraoperative cardiac arrest by Point-of-care ultrasound was rarely reported.

Patient Concerns: A 21-year-old male with Marfan syndrome which manifested Valsalva sinus aneurysms was admitted for aortic valve replacement. After endotracheal intubation, TEE transducer was inserted to evaluate the cardiac structure and function with different views. Severe aortic valve regurgitation was observed in the mid-esophageal aortic valve long and short axis view.

Diagnosis: TEE showed that cardiac contraction was nearly stopped, the spontaneous echo contrast was obvious in the left ventricular and hardly any blood was pumped out from the heart despite the ECG showing normal sinus rhythm with HR 61 beats/min. Meanwhile, the IBP was dropped to 50/30 mm Hg.

Interventions: Chest compressions were started immediately and epinephrine 100 μg was given intravenously. After 30 times of chest compressions, TEE showed that cardiac contractility increased and the stroke volume was improved in the TG SAX view.

Outcomes: The patient was discharged 18 days later in a stable condition.

Lessons: Continuous echocardiography monitoring may be of particular value in forewarning and detecting cardiac arrest in high-risk patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MD.0000000000019928DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7440279PMC
May 2020

Patterns of spatial genetic structures in Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) populations in China.

Parasit Vectors 2019 Nov 21;12(1):552. Epub 2019 Nov 21.

Department of Pathogen Biology, School of Public Health, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China.

Background: The Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus, is one of the 100 worst invasive species in the world and the vector for several arboviruses including dengue, Zika and chikungunya viruses. Understanding the population spatial genetic structure, migration, and gene flow of vector species is critical to effectively preventing and controlling vector-borne diseases. Little is known about the population structure and genetic differentiation of native Ae. albopictus in China. The aim of this study was to examine the patterns of the spatial genetic structures of native Ae. albopictus populations, and their relationship to dengue incidence, on a large geographical scale.

Methods: During 2016-2018, adult female Ae. albopictus mosquitoes were collected by human landing catch (HLC) or human-bait sweep-net collections in 34 localities across China. Thirteen microsatellite markers were used to examine the patterns of genetic diversity, population structure, and gene flow among native Ae. albopictus populations. The correlation between population genetic indices and dengue incidence was also examined.

Results: A total of 153 distinct alleles were identified at the 13 microsatellite loci in the tested populations. All loci were polymorphic, with the number of distinct alleles ranging from eight to sixteen. Genetic parameters such as PIC, heterozygosity, allelic richness and fixation index (F) revealed highly polymorphic markers, high genetic diversity, and low population genetic differentiation. In addition, Bayesian analysis of population structure showed two distinct genetic groups in southern-western and eastern-central-northern China. The Mantel test indicated a positive correlation between genetic distance and geographical distance (R = 0.245, P = 0.01). STRUCTURE analysis, PCoA and GLS interpolation analysis indicated that Ae. albopictus populations in China were regionally clustered. Gene flow and relatedness estimates were generally high between populations. We observed no correlation between population genetic indices of microsatellite loci in Ae. albopictus populations and dengue incidence.

Conclusion: Strong gene flow probably assisted by human activities inhibited population differentiation and promoted genetic diversity among populations of Ae. albopictus. This may represent a potential risk of rapid spread of mosquito-borne diseases. The spatial genetic structure, coupled with the association between genetic indices and dengue incidence, may have important implications for understanding the epidemiology, prevention, and control of vector-borne diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13071-019-3801-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6873696PMC
November 2019

Shared Genetic Control of Root System Architecture between and .

Plant Physiol 2020 02 18;182(2):977-991. Epub 2019 Nov 18.

Department of Agronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011

Determining the genetic control of root system architecture (RSA) in plants via large-scale genome-wide association study (GWAS) requires high-throughput pipelines for root phenotyping. We developed Core Root Excavation using Compressed-air (CREAMD), a high-throughput pipeline for the cleaning of field-grown roots, and Core Root Feature Extraction (COFE), a semiautomated pipeline for the extraction of RSA traits from images. CREAMD-COFE was applied to diversity panels of maize () and sorghum (), which consisted of 369 and 294 genotypes, respectively. Six RSA-traits were extracted from images collected from >3,300 maize roots and >1,470 sorghum roots. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based GWAS identified 87 TAS (trait-associated SNPs) in maize, representing 77 genes and 115 TAS in sorghum. An additional 62 RSA-associated maize genes were identified via expression read depth GWAS. Among the 139 maize RSA-associated genes (or their homologs), 22 (16%) are known to affect RSA in maize or other species. In addition, 26 RSA-associated genes are coregulated with genes previously shown to affect RSA and 51 (37% of RSA-associated genes) are themselves transe-quantitative trait locus for another RSA-associated gene. Finally, the finding that RSA-associated genes from maize and sorghum included seven pairs of syntenic genes demonstrates the conservation of regulation of morphology across taxa.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1104/pp.19.00752DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6997706PMC
February 2020

Disordered Antigens and Epitope Overlap Between Anti-Citrullinated Protein Antibodies and Rheumatoid Factor in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

Arthritis Rheumatol 2020 02 10;72(2):262-272. Epub 2019 Dec 10.

University of Wisconsin-Madison and William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital.

Objective: Anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs) and rheumatoid factor (RF) are commonly present in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) without a clear rationale for their coexistence. Moreover, autoantibodies develop against proteins with different posttranslational modifications and native proteins without obvious unifying characteristics of the antigens. We undertook this study to broadly evaluate autoantibody binding in seronegative and seropositive RA to identify novel features of reactivity.

Methods: An array was created using a total of 172,828 native peptides, citrulline-containing peptides, and homocitrulline-containing peptides derived primarily from proteins citrullinated in the rheumatoid joint. IgG and IgM binding to peptides were compared between cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP)-positive RF+, CCP+RF-, CCP-RF+, and CCP-RF- serum from RA patients (n = 48) and controls (n = 12). IgG-bound and endogenously citrullinated peptides were analyzed for amino acid patterns and predictors of intrinsic disorder, i.e., unstable 3-dimensional structure. Binding to IgG-derived peptides was specifically evaluated. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay confirmed key results.

Results: Broadly, CCP+RF+ patients had high citrulline-specific IgG binding to array peptides and CCP+RF- and CCP-RF+ patients had modest citrulline-specific IgG binding (median Z scores 3.02, 1.42, and 0.75, respectively; P < 0.0001). All RA groups had low homocitrulline-specific binding. CCP+RF+ patients had moderate IgG binding to native peptides (median Z score 2.38; P < 0.0001). The highest IgG binding was to citrulline-containing peptides, irrespective of protein identity, especially if citrulline was adjacent to glycine or serine, motifs also seen in endogenous citrullination in the rheumatoid joint. Highly bound peptides had multiple features predictive of disorder. IgG from CCP+RF+ patients targeted citrulline-containing IgG-derived peptides.

Conclusion: Disordered antigens, which are frequently citrullinated, and common epitopes for ACPAs and RF are potentially unifying features for RA autoantibodies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/art.41074DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6994383PMC
February 2020

Comparison of curative effects between mammotome-assisted minimally invasive resection (MAMIR) and traditional open surgery for gynecomastia in Chinese patients: A prospective clinical study.

Breast J 2019 11 2;25(6):1084-1089. Epub 2019 Jul 2.

Department of Mammary Surgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang, China.

To analyze and compare prospectively the curative effects between mammotome-assisted minimally invasive resection (MAMIR) and traditional open surgery (TOS) for gynecomastia in Chinese male patients, a total of 60 patients suffering from grade I and II gynecomastia, evaluated by automated whole-breast ultrasound (AWBU), were recruited and randomly divided into TOS and MAMIR groups (each n = 30). The postoperative scar size, healing time, patient hospital stay, postoperative satisfaction, postoperative pain, and complications including edema and bruising were analyzed. The participants were followed up for 1 week, 1 month, 6 months, and 1 year after surgery. Compared with patients who received TOS, patients in the MAMIR group had significantly smaller scar sizes (0.40 ± 0.08 cm vs 5.34 ± 0.38 cm, P < 0.01), shorter healing times (3.67 ± 0.71 days vs 7.90 ± 0.92 days, P < 0.01), and hospitalization (2.60 ± 0.62 vs 7.17 ± 0.83 days, P < 0.01), as well as higher postoperative satisfaction (4.70 ± 0.60 vs 3.20 ± 0.55 scores, P < 0.01), respectively. Patients in the MAMIR group experienced postoperative mild pain significantly more often than those in the TOS group (6.70 ± 1.06 vs 4.13 ± 0.78 scores, P < 0.01, respectively), but with significantly less postoperative severe pain (53.33% vs 0.00%, P < 0.000). While the incidence rate of edema and bruises was significantly higher in the MAMIR group compared with the TOS group (47% vs 17%, P = 0.013 and 54% vs 20%, P = 0.007, respectively). MAMIR had advantages for curative effects compared with traditional open surgery. However, the recurrence rate in patients needs to be further studied.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tbj.13424DOI Listing
November 2019

Height-based dosing algorithm of bupivacaine in spinal anaesthesia for decreasing maternal hypotension in caesarean section without prophylactic fluid preloading and vasopressors: study protocol for a randomised controlled non-inferiority trial.

BMJ Open 2019 05 16;9(5):e024912. Epub 2019 May 16.

Department of Anesthesiology, ShenZhen People's Hospital, 2nd Clinical Medical College of Jinan University, Shenzhen, China.

Introduction: Effectively preventing or treating spinal-induced maternal hypotension is considered to be the Holy Grail of obstetric anaesthesia. Prophylactic fluid preloading and vasopressors decrease hypotension but may aggravate heart load, induce fetal acidosis or maternal bradycardia. Using low-dose local anaesthetic decreases hypotension but may cause insufficient anaesthesia. Whether there is a height-based dosing algorithm of local anaesthetic in spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section that can provide sufficient anaesthesia with less hypotension without prophylactic fluid preloading and vasopressors is unclear. This study was designed to investigate a height-based dosing algorithm of bupivacaine in spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section.

Methods And Analysis: This single-centre, double-blinded, prospective, non-inferiority, randomised controlled trial will include 264 parturients (between 18 and 45 years of age) who are scheduled for caesarean section. All participants will not receive prophylactic fluid preloading. The participants will be randomly divided into two groups: the test group or conventional group. For parturients in the test group, 0.5% isobaric bupivacaine (1.15-1.70 mL) will be injected into the subarachnoid space without prophylactic vasopressors. The bupivacaine dose depends on the height of subjects. For parturients in the conventional group, 0.5% bupivacaine (1.8 mL) will be injected into the subarachnoid space along with prophylactic vasopressors. The primary outcome is the incidence of maternal hypotension. The secondary outcomes include the failure rate of spinal anaesthesia, level of sensory block, degree of motor block, other complications in parturients, time of operation, neonatal outcome and quality of anaesthesia.

Ethics And Dissemination: This study was approved by the Ethics Committee of Shenzhen People's Hospital of Jinan University (Permit No. SZY-00251, chairperson Xiaofang Yu) on 8 February 2018The study results will be disseminated through peer-reviewed journals, professional societies and meetings.

Trial Registration Number: NCT03497364; Pre-results.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2018-024912DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6530369PMC
May 2019

Application of second-generation Shikani optical stylet in critically ill patients undergoing cerebral aneurysm embolization.

J Int Med Res 2019 Apr 6;47(4):1565-1572. Epub 2019 Feb 6.

Department of Anesthesiology, The Second Clinical Medical College of Jinan University, Shenzhen People's Hospital, Shenzhen, China.

Objective: This study was performed to compare the clinical value of the second-generation Shikani optical stylet with that of the Macintosh laryngoscope for tracheal intubation of patients undergoing cerebral aneurysm embolization.

Methods: Thirty-six patients who underwent cerebral aneurysm embolization were included. The intubation time, intubation success rate, blood oxygen saturation, heart rate, systolic blood pressure (SBP), and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were measured. Adverse reactions during tracheal intubation and the local tissue injury rate were recorded. Comparisons between the groups were performed with one-way analysis of variance.

Results: The heart rate, SBP, and DBP upon tracheal intubation and at 1 and 3 minutes were significantly higher in the Macintosh laryngoscope group than in the Shikani optical stylet group. The time to completion of tracheal intubation was significantly shorter and the tissue injury rate was significantly lower in the Shikani optimal stylet group than in the Macintosh laryngoscope group.

Conclusions: The second-generation Shikani optical stylet is a simple, safe, and reliable tool for tracheal intubation in critically ill patients undergoing cerebral aneurysm embolization.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0300060518822243DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6460621PMC
April 2019

A comprehensive study of immunology repertoires in both preoperative stage and postoperative stage in patients with colorectal cancer.

Mol Genet Genomic Med 2019 03 9;7(3):e504. Epub 2019 Jan 9.

Department of Anesthesiology, Shenzhen People's Hospital, 2nd Clinical Medical College of Jinan University, Shenzhen, Guangdong, China.

Background: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the 3rd most common cancer type in the world. The correlation between immune repertoire and prognosis of CRC has been well studied in the last decades. The diversity and stability of the immune cells can be measured by hypervariable complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) segments of the T-cell receptor (TCR).

Methods: In this study, we collected five healthy controls and 19 CRC patients' peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in three stages, namely 1 day preoperative, 3 days' postoperative, and 7 days' postoperative, respectively. Simultaneously, we have also done the comparative analysis of these two different anesthesia methods, namely TIVA and CEGA. Sequencing of the TCR segments has been performed by multiplex PCR and high-throughput next-generation sequencing. We also analyzed the distribution of CDR3 length, highly expansion clones (HECs), TRBV, and TRBJ gene usage.

Results: Our result showed a significant difference between TCR CDR3 length distribution and HEC distribution between CRC patients and healthy controls. We also found that TRBV11-2, TRBV12-1, TRBV16, TRBV3-2, TRBV4-2, TRBV4-3, TRBV5-4, TRBV6-8, TRBV7-8, TRBV7-9 and RBV11-2, TRBV12-1, TRBV16, TRBV3-2, TRBV4-2, TRBV4-3, TRBV5-4, TRBV6-8, TRBV7-8, and TRBV7-9 usages are different between CRC patients and healthy controls.

Conclusion: In conclusion, CRC patients were presented with different immune repertoire in comparison with healthy controls. In this study, significant difference in TRBV and TRBJ gene usage in between case and control group could provide some potential biomarker for the diagnosis and the treatment of the patients with CRC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mgg3.504DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6418368PMC
March 2019

Investigating the efficacy of a new intravenous (IV) nanoemulsified sevoflurane/arginine formulation for maintenance of general anesthesia for embolization of cerebral aneurysm.

J Photochem Photobiol B 2018 Oct 18;187:61-65. Epub 2018 Jul 18.

Department of Anesthesiology, The Second Clinical Medical College of Jinan University, Shenzhen People's Hospital, PR China. Electronic address:

The aim of this research investigation was to profound analysis the mitigating impact of sevoflurane/arginine post-molding on cerebral ischemia-reperfusion damage in rats. The authors fabricated emulsions fusing sevoflurane, perfluorooctyl bromide as a settling specialist, and mixes of arginine polymer. Cell suitability and gene expression of tubulin and NeuN were assessed. The stability, morphology and functional group were evaluated utilizing dynamic light scattering (DLS), Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Cerebral aneurysms were prompted through hypertension and a solitary stereotactic infusion of elastase into the basal storage in rat. The capacity of the emulsions to decreased cerebral aneurysm was tried in vivo by regulating them IV delivery of Se/Arg samples to rats. Se/Arg pre-conditioning expanded cell feasibility in neuroblast (SK-N-DZ) cells. Se/Arg pre-conditioning diminished infarct volume and enhanced neurological result in rats subjected to cerebral hypoxia-ischemia. Se/Arg preconditioning expanded levels of tubulin and NeuN. The prepared sevoflurane/arginine material pre-conditioning-incited neuroprotective impacts in vitro as well as in vivo analyses. Sevoflurane/arginine post-molding decreased cerebral tissue misfortune detected 7 days after cerebrum hypoxia-ischemia. This impact was prompted by clinically significant focuses and canceled by Sevoflurane/arginine. These outcomes recommend that Sevoflurane/arginine post-conditioning ensures neonatal cerebrum against cerebrum hypoxia-ischemia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jphotobiol.2018.07.017DOI Listing
October 2018

-Effects Condition the Induction of a Major Unfolded Protein Response Factor, , in Response to Heat Stress in Maize.

Front Plant Sci 2018 29;9:833. Epub 2018 Jun 29.

Plant Sciences Institute, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, United States.

Adverse environmental conditions such as heat and salt stress create endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in maize and set off the unfolded protein response (UPR). A key feature of the UPR is the upregulation of and the splicing of its messenger RNA. We conducted an association analysis of a recombinant inbred line (RIL) derived from a cross of a tropical founder line, CML52 with a standard temperate line, B73. We found a major QTL conditioning heat-induced expression located to the gene. Based on the premise that the QTL might be associated with the promoter, we evaluated various maize inbred lines for their ability to upregulate the expression of in response to heat stress. In general, tropical lines with promoter regions similar to CML52 were more robust in upregulating in response to heat stress. This finding was confirmed by comparing the strength of the B73 and CML52 promoters in transient maize protoplast assays. We concluded that the upstream region of is important in conditioning the response to heat stress and was under selection in maize when adapted to different environments. Heat stress has large negative effects on maize grain yield. Heat stress creates ER stress in maize and sets off the UPR. We searched for factors conditioning heat induction of the UPR in maize seedlings by conducting an association analysis based on the upregulation of unspliced and spliced forms of mRNA (ZmbZIP60u and ZmbZIP60s, respectively). ZmbZIP60u was upregulated more robustly by heat stress in the tropical maize line, CML52, than in B73, and a major QTL derived from the analysis of RILs from a cross of these two lines mapped in the vicinity of . We conducted a test to determine whether the QTL was acting as a regulatory element or in , as might be expected for a transcription factor. We found that the QTL was acting , likely involving the promoter. promoters in other temperate and tropical lines similar to CML52 showed enhanced expression of ZmbZIP60u by heat. The contribution of the CML52 promoter to heat induction of was confirmed by analyzing the CML52 and B73 promoters linked to a luciferase reporter and assayed in heat-treated maize protoplasts.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpls.2018.00833DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6034121PMC
June 2018

Comparison of the effect of high versus low mean arterial pressure levels on clinical outcomes and complications in elderly patients during non-cardiothoracic surgery under general anesthesia: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

Trials 2017 Nov 21;18(1):554. Epub 2017 Nov 21.

Clinical Medical Research Center, The Second Clinical Medicine College, Jinan University, Shenzhen, 518001, China.

Background: Intraoperative blood pressure (BP) is a concern in daily clinic anesthesia and contributes to the differences in clinical outcome. We conducted a randomized controlled trial (RCT) to compare the effect of high vs. low mean arterial pressure (MAP) levels on clinical outcomes and complications in elderly patients under general anesthesia (GA).

Methods: In this multicenter, randomized, parallel-controlled, open-label, assessor-blinded clinical trial, 322 patients aged more than 65 years will be randomized for a low-level MAP (60-70 mmHg) or high-level MAP (90-100 mmHg) during non-cardiothoracic surgery under GA. The primary outcome will be the incidence of postoperative delirium. The secondary outcomes will include the delirium duration days, intraoperative urine volume, intraoperative blood loss, specific postoperative complications, and all-cause 28-day mortality.

Discussion: Results of this trial will help clarify whether BP management is beneficial for elderly patients under GA and will make clear whether the effect of high-level MAP can reduce the postoperative complication compared to low-level MAP.

Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02857153 . Registered on 15 July 2016.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13063-017-2233-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5698923PMC
November 2017
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