Publications by authors named "Ziab Alahmadey"

2 Publications

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Durability of the humoral immune response in recovered COVID-19 patients.

Saudi J Biol Sci 2021 May 16;28(5):2802-2806. Epub 2021 Feb 16.

Ziab Alahmadey, Ministry of Health, Ohud Hospital, Madinah, Saudi Arabia.

Background: The immunological factors involved in protection against the disease caused by SARS-CoV-2 are insufficiently defined and understood. However, previous knowledge pertaining to the related SARS virus and other human coronaviruses may prove useful. Population-based serosurveys measuring anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies may provide a pattern for estimating infection degrees and observing the development of the epidemic. In this study, we aimed to investigate the persistence of antibody against the SARS-CoV-2 in recovered patients in Al Madinah region of Saudi Arabia.

Materials And Methods: A total of 150 recovered COVID-19 patients participated in this study. All the patients tested positive for the presence of SARS-CoV-2 RNA, using qualitative RT-PCR. An ELISA was used to measure anti-Spike (S) IgG antibodies in serum samples and screen for their persistence at various time points post-infection.

Results: The patients were categorized as asymptomatic (27.3%), mild (28%) and moderate (44.7%) according to the disease severity. Amongst them, 35.3% were females (n = 53) and 64.7% were males (n = 97). Significant anti-S IgG antibody levels were observed among the different groups, with the patients in moderate group exhibiting the highest levels followed by the mild group; while the lowest levels were detected among the asymptomatic. There was a significant positive correlation between the patients' age and anti-S IgG antibody concentrations (Pearson r = 0.45; p < 0.001).

Conclusion: Our findings provide a solid evidence to support the use of an anti-S IgG ELISA as a diagnostic tool to indicate SARS-CoV-2 infection. IgG seropositivity was sustained in recovered patients up to a hundred days' post-infection, the latest time point for antibody measurement in our study. Ours is the first report in Saudi Arabia to investigate the durability of humoral immune response in recovered COVID-19 patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjbs.2021.02.011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7884256PMC
May 2021

The detection of SARS-CoV-2 in outpatient clinics and public facilities during the COVID-19 pandemic.

J Med Virol 2021 05 10;93(5):2955-2961. Epub 2021 Feb 10.

Department of Medical Laboratory Technology, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Taibah University, Madinah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

The transmission of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) can occur through an airborne route, in addition to contaminated surfaces and objects. In hospitals, it has been confirmed by several studies that SARS-CoV-2 can contaminate surfaces and medical equipment especially in hospitals dedicated to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients. The aim of this study was to detect the contamination of hands, objects, and surfaces in isolation rooms and also in outpatients' clinics in hospitals and polyclinics. Environmental contamination of public high-touch surfaces in public facilities was also investigated during an active COVID-19 pandemic. Random swabs were also taken from public shops, pharmacies, bakeries, groceries, banknotes, and automated teller machines (ATMs). Samples were analyzed for SARS-CoV-2 positivity using real-time polymerase chain reaction. In the COVID-19 regional reference hospital, only 3 out of 20 samples were positive for SARS-CoV-2 RNA. Hand swabs from SARS-CoV-2-positive patients in isolation rooms were occasionally positive for viral RNA. In outpatients' clinics, door handles were the most contaminated surfaces. Dental chairs, sinks, keyboards, ophthalmoscopes, and laboratory equipment were also contaminated. Although no positive swabs were found in shops and public facilities, random ATM swabs returned a positive result for SARS-CoV-2. Although there is no longer a focus on COVID-19 wards and isolation hospitals, more attention is required to decontaminate frequently touched surfaces in health-care facilities used by patients not diagnosed with COVID-19. Additionally, high-touch public surfaces such as ATMs require further disinfection procedures to limit the transmission of the infection.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmv.26819DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8014553PMC
May 2021