Publications by authors named "Zhong Hui Liu"

28 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Association of body fat distribution and metabolic syndrome with the occurrence of colorectal adenoma: A case-control study.

J Dig Dis 2021 Apr 29;22(4):222-229. Epub 2021 Mar 29.

Department of Surgery, University of Hong Kong-Shenzhen Hospital, Shenzhen, Guangdong Province, China.

Objective: Visceral fat is thought to play different roles in the carcinogenesis of the colon with peripheral fat. Our aim was to evaluate the association of body fat distribution measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) with the incidence of colorectal adenoma (CRA).

Methods: A total of 410 asymptomatic participants who underwent a screening colonoscopy from July 2017 to December 2019 in our center were recruited, including 230 with adenomas and 180 without detected adenomas. The participants' body fat was measured by BIA, including their body fat mass (BFM), body fat percentage (BFP), and waist-to-hip ratio. Parameters of metabolic syndrome (MetS), including waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting blood glucose (FBG), blood level of triglyceride, cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein were measured as well.

Results: According to univariate analysis, age, male sex, body mass index, waist circumference, BFM, waist-to-hip ratio, blood pressure, and FBG were higher in the adenoma group than in the adenoma-free group (P < 0.05). On multivariate logistical analysis (adjusted for age, sex, smoking, drinking, and family history of CRC), a high waist-to-hip ratio was associated with a high incidence of CRA (odds ratio [OR] 1.84, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09-3.09, P = 0.02). Only a large waist circumference in components of MetS was independently associated with the incidence of CRA (OR 1.90, 95% CI 1.17-3.08, P = 0.01) in the multivariate analysis.

Conclusion: Body fat distribution is associated with CRA, central obesity is a core risk factor for CRA in MetS. Chinese Clinical Trial Registration number: ChiCTR-RRC-17010862.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1751-2980.12979DOI Listing
April 2021

Combined endo-laparoscopic surgery for difficult benign colorectal polyps.

J Gastrointest Oncol 2020 Jun;11(3):475-485

Department of Surgery, The University of Hong Kong-Shenzhen Hospital, Shenzhen 518053, China.

Prevention of colorectal cancer (CRC) depends largely on the detection and removal of colorectal polyps. Despite the advances in endoscopic techniques, there are still a subgroup of polyps that cannot be treated purely by endoscopic approach, which comprise of about 10-15% of all the polyps. These so-called "difficult colorectal polyps" are polyps with large size, morphology, at difficult location, scarring or due to recurrence, which have historically been managed by surgical segmental resection. In treating benign difficult colorectal polyps, we have to balance the operative risks and morbidities associated with surgical segmental resection. Therefore, combined endoscopic and laparoscopic surgery (CELS) has been developed to remove this subgroup of difficult benign polyps. We review the currently use of CELS for difficult benign colorectal polyps which includes laparoscopy-assisted endoscopic polypectomy (LACP), full-thickness laparo-endoscopic excision (FLEX) and colonoscopy-assisted laparoscopic wedge resection (CAL-WR).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.21037/jgo.2019.12.11DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7340814PMC
June 2020

Preventable Deaths in Multiple Trauma Patients: The Importance of Auditing and Continuous Quality Improvement.

World J Surg 2020 06;44(6):1835-1843

Department of Surgery, The University of Hong Kong-Shenzhen Hospital, Shenzhen, China.

Background: Management errors during pre-hospital care, triage process and resuscitation have been widely reported as the major source of preventable and potentially preventable deaths in multiple trauma patients. Common tools for defining whether it is a preventable, potentially preventable or non-preventable death include the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) clinical guideline, the Injury Severity Score (ISS) and the Trauma and Injury Severity Score (TRISS). Therefore, these surrogated scores were utilized in reviewing the study's trauma services.

Methods: Trauma data were prospectively collected and retrospectively reviewed from January 1, 2018, to December 31, 2018. All cases of trauma death were discussed and audited by the Hospital Trauma Committee on a regular basis. Standardized form was used to document the patient's management flow and details in every case during the meeting, and the final verdict (whether death was preventable or not) was agreed and signed by every member of the team. The reasons for the death of the patients were further classified into severe injuries, inappropriate/delayed examination, inappropriate/delayed treatment, wrong decision, insufficient supervision/guidance or lack of appropriate guidance.

Results: A total of 1913 trauma patients were admitted during the study period, 82 of whom were identified as major trauma (either ISS > 15 or trauma team was activated). Among the 82 patients with major trauma, eight were trauma-related deaths, one of which was considered a preventable death and the other 7 were considered unpreventable. The decision from the hospital's performance improvement and patient safety program indicates that for every trauma patient, basic life support principles must be followed in the course of primary investigations for bedside trauma series X-ray (chest and pelvis) and FAST scan in the resuscitation room by a person who meets the criteria for trauma team activation recommended by ATLS.

Conclusion: Mechanisms to rectify errors in the management of multiple trauma patients are essential for improving the quality of trauma care. Regular auditing in the trauma service is one of the most important parts of performance improvement and patient safety program, and it should be well established by every major trauma center in Mainland China. It can enhance the trauma management processes, decision-making skills and practical skills, thereby continuously improving quality and reducing mortality of this group of patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00268-020-05423-3DOI Listing
June 2020

Melanosis coli: Harmless pigmentation? A case-control retrospective study of 657 cases.

PLoS One 2017 31;12(10):e0186668. Epub 2017 Oct 31.

Department of Surgery, The Sixth Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, China.

Backgrounds And Aims: The association of melanosis coli with the development of colorectal polyps remains uncertain.

Methods: From a total of 18263 patients who had received colonoscopy in our hospital, 219 with melanosis coli cases and 438 controls matched by age and sex (at 1:2 ratio) were included in this study. The association of incidence, number, location, and pathology of colorectal neoplasm with grades and distribution of melanosis coli were analyzed.

Results: Melanosis coli was associated with significantly more colorectal polyps than control, a higher incidence of numerous colorectal polyps (number ≥ 20) (7.3% vs 0.5%; p < 0.001), and higher number of small colorectal polyps (diameter ≤ 5 mm; p < 0.01). Patients with melanosis coli had higher incidences of low-grade adenomas (31.1% vs 23.3%, p < 0.05) and non-adenoma polyps (20.1% vs 12.8%, p < 0.05) than the controls. On multivariate analysis, melanosis coli was independently associated with increased detecting rates of low grade adenoma (OR = 1.54; 95%: 1.06-2.23; p < .05), non-adenoma polyp (OR = 1.72; 95%: 1.11-2.70; p < .05) and numerous polyps (OR = 16.2, 95%: 3.66-71.6; p < .05). There was no significant difference in the incidence of high-grade adenomas or adenocarcinomas in the two population groups, but the numbers of these lesions were insufficient to permit firm conclusions. No significant differences in incidence, number, and pathology of colorectal polyps between individuals with melanosis coli of three different grades of severity were found. Melanosis located predominantly in the right colon had an interestingly lower incidence of colonic polyps in right colon than did melanosis located predominantly in the left colon or total colon (8.9% vs. 26.3%, 24.0%, p < 0.05). Patients with melanosis coli had significantly more nonspecific distal ileal ulcers than did controls (8.0% vs 0%, p < 0.001).

Conclusion: Melanosis coli is associated with a higher incidence and number of colonic non-adenoma polyps and low-grade adenomas, and higher incidence of distal ileal ulcers. Melanosis coli may not be a harmless pigmentation, but a sign of chronic injury of colonic and intestinal mucosa.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0186668PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5663380PMC
November 2017

Effects of AMPD1 gene C34T polymorphism on cardiac index, blood pressure and prognosis in patients with cardiovascular diseases: a meta-analysis.

BMC Cardiovasc Disord 2017 07 3;17(1):174. Epub 2017 Jul 3.

Department of Emergency, Weifang Yidu Central Hospital, No. 4138, Linglongshan Southern Road, Weifang, 262500, People's Republic of China.

Background: The meta-analysis was aimed to evaluate the effects of AMPD1 gene C34T polymorphism on cardiac function indexes, blood pressure and prognosis in patients with cardiovascular diseases (CVD).

Methods: Eligible studies were retrieved through a comprehensive search of electronic databases and manual search. Then the high-quality studies met the rigorous inclusion and exclusion criteria, as well as related to the subject was selected for the study. Comprehensive data analyses were conducted using STATA software 12.0.

Results: The study results revealed that CVD patients with CT + TT genotype of AMPD1 C34T polymorphism presented elevated left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) (%) and reduced left ventricular end diastolic dimension (LVEDD) (mm) as compared with CC genotype, moreover, the subgroup analysis found that the LVEF (%) was markedly higher in heart failure (HF) patients carrying CT + TT genotype than CC genotype. Besides, the systolic blood pressure (SBP) (mmHg) in CVD patients with CT + TT genotype was obviously decreased in contrast with the CC genotype. Patients suffered from HF with different genotypes (CT + TT and CC) of AMPD1 C34T polymorphism exhibited no significant differences in total survival rate and cardiac survival rate.

Conclusions: Our current meta-analysis indicated that the T allele of AMPD1 gene C34T polymorphism may be correlated with LVEF, LVEDD and SBP, which plays a protective role in the cardiac functions and blood pressure in CVD patients, but had no effects on total survival rate and cardiac survival rate for HF.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12872-017-0608-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5496365PMC
July 2017

Transperineal endoscopic drainage of a presacral and paraspinal abscess.

Endoscopy 2016 0;48(S 01):E361-E362. Epub 2016 Nov 16.

Division of Colorectal Surgery, Department of Surgery, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0042-118597DOI Listing
August 2017

Serum levels of sex hormones and expression of their receptors in thyroid tissue in female patients with various types of thyroid neoplasms.

Pathol Res Pract 2014 Dec 18;210(12):830-5. Epub 2014 Sep 18.

Department of Anesthesia, First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun 130021, China. Electronic address:

Previous studies have demonstrated the expression of estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) in thyroid cancer; however, little is known regarding the levels of estrogen, progesterone, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and luteinizing hormone (LH) in serum and the expression of ER, PR, FSH receptor (FSHR), and LH receptor (LHR) in thyroid tissues of patients with different types of thyroid neoplasms. Serum levels of estrogen, progesterone, FSH, and LH were measured by chemiluminescence, and expression of ER, PR, FSHR, and LHR in thyroid tissue was detected by immunohistochemistry in female patients with thyroid adenoma (n = 70), nodular goiter (n = 73), thyroid papillary cancer (n = 149), poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma (n = 12), or undifferentiated thyroid carcinoma (n = 8) and in normal controls (n = 60). The positive rates of serum estrogen level and ERα expression were significantly greater in patients with various types of thyroid neoplasms than in normal controls. The positive rates of ERβ expression were significantly less in various types of thyroid neoplasms than in normal thyroid tissues, especially in poorly differentiated carcinoma and undifferentiated carcinoma. The negative rates of serum progesterone level and positive rates of PR expression in thyroid tissue were significantly greater in patients with thyroid adenoma, nodular goiter, or thyroid papillary cancer than in normal controls. The positive rates of serum FSH and LH levels and FSHR and LHR expression were significantly greater in the thyroid adenoma group than in other groups. Our findings suggest that thyroid neoplasms might be sex hormone-dependent. The positive expression of ERα and PR often indicates thyroid papillary carcinoma, and the ERβ expression status is important for the diagnosis of poorly differentiated carcinoma and undifferentiated carcinoma. In addition, thyroid adenoma is often accompanied by an increase in serum FSH and LH levels, as well as FSHR and LHR expression. Thus, the combined detection of serum levels of sex hormones and expression of their receptors allows for a differential diagnosis and evaluation of the degree of differentiation among various types of thyroid neoplasms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prp.2014.09.002DOI Listing
December 2014

Enteral supplementation of alanyl-glutamine attenuates the up-regulation of beta-defensin-2 protein in lung injury induced by intestinal ischemia reperfusion in rats.

Int J Surg 2014 Nov 6;12(11):1181-6. Epub 2014 Aug 6.

Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, The Sixth Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address:

Background: Beta-defensin-2 (BD-2), an endogenous antimicrobial peptide, plays a key role in immune response against microbial invasion. This study aimed to observe the effect of Alanyl-Glutamine (Ala-Gln) on BD-2 protein expression in pulmonary tissues after intestinal ischemia reperfusion (IIR) in rats and to investigate its correlations to pulmonary inflammatory and oxidative injury.

Methods: Rats in IIR and the two treatment groups were subjected to intestine ischemia for 60 min and those in the treatment groups were administered orally with Ala-Gln or alanine (Ala) respectively. Lung tissues were harvested to detect the BD-2 protein expression. Concentrations of Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and malondialdehyde (MDA) as well as superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in lung tissues were determined simultaneously.

Results: Ala-Gln attenuated the up-regulation of BD-2 expression (p < 0.05) and TNF-α (p < 0.05), MDA (p < 0.05) levels, as well as the reduction of SOD activity (p < 0.05) in lung tissues after IIR. But Ala did not exert significant effects. BD-2 protein in lung tissues was positively correlated to local TNF-α level (p < 0.01) and MDA concentration (p < 0.01) with statistical significance.

Conclusion: Ala-Gln can relieve the IIR-induced up-regulation of BD-2 protein expression in the lung of rats, which involves anti-inflammation and anti-oxidation mechanisms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijsu.2014.08.003DOI Listing
November 2014

Role of activin A in carbon tetrachloride-induced acute liver injury.

World J Gastroenterol 2013 Jun;19(24):3802-9

Department of Immunology, Norman Bethune College of Medicine, Jilin University, Changchun 130021, Jilin Province, China.

Aim: To investigate the expression and role of activin A in a mouse model of acute chemical liver injury.

Methods: Acute liver injury in C57BL/6 male mice was induced by intraperitoneal injection with carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) (0.5 mL/kg, body weight) dissolved in olive oil (1:19 v/v). Mice were sacrificed 1, 3, 5 and 7 d after the treatment. The levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) in serum were examined and pathological changes of liver observed by hematoxylin and eosin staining to evaluate the liver injury. Activin A protein levels in serum and hepatic tissue homogenate of mice were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the expression pattern of activin A protein in livers of mice was examined by immunohistochemistry. Activin type IIA receptor (ActRIIA) and Smad3 expressions in the liver were analyzed by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. In order to further investigate the role of activin A, we also utilized activin A blocking experiment by anti-activin A antibody (500 μg/kg, body weight) injection into mouse tail vein.

Results: In CCl4-treated mice, serum ALT and AST levels were significantly increased, compared with that in control mice (P < 0.01). Furthermore, the serious necrosis was observed around hepatic portal areas in CCl4-treated mice. Simultaneously, activin A levels in serum and hepatic tissue homogenate of mice treated with CCl4 for 1, 3 and 5 d increased significantly, compared with that in control mice (P < 0.01). Activin A protein expression in hepatocytes not within the necrotic area was also upregulated in mice following CCl4 treatment. Not only activin A, but also ActRIIA and activin signaling molecule Smad3 mRNA expressions in injury liver induced by CCl4 were significantly higher than that in control liver. In addition, levels of serum ALT and AST in CCl4-treated mice were significantly decreased by injection of anti-activin A antibody to block endogenous activin A action, compared with that in CCl4-treated mice by injection of immunoglobulin G instead of anti-activin A antibody (P < 0.01), and the severity of liver injury was also reduced remarkably.

Conclusion: These data show that activin A is involved in CCl4-induced acute liver injury. Blocking activin A actions may be a therapeutic approach for acute liver injury.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3748/wjg.v19.i24.3802DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3699031PMC
June 2013

The expression and role of activin A and follistatin in heart failure rats after myocardial infarction.

Int J Cardiol 2013 Oct 25;168(3):2994-7. Epub 2013 Apr 25.

Department of Cardiology, China-Japan Union Hospital, Jilin University, Changchun, China.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijcard.2013.04.012DOI Listing
October 2013

Co-expression of activin receptor-interacting protein 1 and 2 in mouse nerve cells.

Neurosci Lett 2013 May 21;542:53-8. Epub 2013 Mar 21.

Department of Physiology, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009, China.

Activin is a neurotrophic and neuroprotective factor in the central nervous system. Activin receptor-interacting protein 1 and 2 (ARIP1 and ARIP2) are identified as activin signal proteins in mouse brain. However, whether ARIP1 and ARIP2 are co-expressed in nerve cells and the differences of their biological activities are not well characterized. In the present study, we found that ARIP1 and ARIP2 mRNA expressions were detectable in mouse brain and their proteins were co-localized at the hypothalamus of cerebrum and granular layers in cerebellum, especially in Purkinje cells. Furthermore, ARIP1 and ARIP2 were co-expressed in mouse Neuro-2a cells, which is similar to the co-localization of ARIP1 and ARIP2 in hypothalamus neurons and Purkinje cells. Overexpression of ARIP1 in Neuro-2a cells inhibited activin signal transduction induced by activin A and Smad3, and activin A-induced voltage-gated Na(+) current (INa), while ARIP2 was only a negative regulator of signal transduction induced by activin A and did not alter activin A-induced INa. Taken together, these data demonstrate that ARIP1 and ARIP2 are co-expressed in some nerve cells and their biological activities are distinct.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neulet.2013.03.012DOI Listing
May 2013

[Effects of lead on protein kinase C expression in U251 cell line].

Zhonghua Lao Dong Wei Sheng Zhi Ye Bing Za Zhi 2012 Feb;30(2):120-2

Tianjin Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Tianjin 300011, China.

Objective: To observe the effects of lead on mRNA and protein expression of PKC in U251 cell line.

Methods: After U251 cells were exposed to 0.05, 0.50, 5.00, 50.00, 500.00, 900.00 and 1000.00 micromol/L Ph(Ac)2 for 24 hours, the cytotoxicity of Pb on U251 cells was measured by MTT assay. RT-PCR and Western blot assay were used to detect the mRNA and protein expression levels of PKC in U251 cells exposed to 0.05, 5.00 and 500.00 micromol/L Ph (Ac), for 24 hours.

Results: The survival rates of U251 cells treated with 5.00, 50.00, 500.00, 900.00 and 1000.00 micromol/L Pb (Ac)2 were 84.5%, 78.2%, 76.5%, 50.3% and 43.2%, respectively, which were significantly lower than those of control group (P < 0.01). The PKC mRNA expression level (0.40 +/- 0.01) of U251 cells treated with 500.00 micromol/L Pb (Ac)2 was significantly lower than that (0.51 +/- 0.02) of control group (P < 0.01). The PKC protein expression levels of U251 cells treated with 0.05, 5.00 or 500.00 micromol/L Pb(Ac)2 were 0.68 +/- 0.02, 0.62 +/- 0.01 and 0.33 +/- 0.02, respectively, which were significantly lower (0.98 +/- 0.01) than those of control group (P < 0.01).

Conclusion: Lead can decline the cell viability, PKC mRNA and protein expression levels of U251 cells.
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February 2012

The role and mechanism of action of activin A in neurite outgrowth of chicken embryonic dorsal root ganglia.

J Cell Sci 2012 Mar 24;125(Pt 6):1500-7. Epub 2012 Jan 24.

Department of Immunology, Norman Bethune College of Medicine, Jilin University, 126 Xinmin Street, Changchun 130021, China.

Activin A, a member of the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) superfamily, plays an essential role in neuron survival as a neurotrophic and neuroprotective factor in the central nervous system. However, the effects and mechanisms of action of activin A on the neurite outgrowth of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) remain unclear. In the present study, we found that activin A is expressed in DRG collected from chicken embryos on embryonic day 8 (E8). Moreover, activin A induced neurite outgrowth of the primary cultured DRG and maintained the survival of monolayer-cultured DRG neurons throughout the observation period of ten days. Follistatin (FS), an activin-binding protein, significantly inhibited activin A-induced neurite outgrowth of DRG, but failed to influence the effect of nerve growth factor (NGF) on DRG neurite outgrowth. Furthermore, the results showed that activin A significantly upregulated mRNA expression of activin receptor type IIA (ActRIIA) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in DRG, and stimulated serotonin (5-HT) production from DRG, indicating that activin A might induce DRG neurite outgrowth by promoting CGRP expression and stimulating 5-HT release. These data suggest that activin A plays an important role in the development of DRG in an autocrine or paracrine manner.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.094151DOI Listing
March 2012

Tissue metabolomic fingerprinting reveals metabolic disorders associated with human gastric cancer morbidity.

Oncol Rep 2011 Aug 10;26(2):431-8. Epub 2011 May 10.

Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, The Sixth Affiliated Hospital (Gastrointestinal and Anal Hospital), Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510655, PR China.

The principal way to improve the outcome of gastric cancer (GC) is to predict carcinogenesis and metastasis at an early stage. The aims of the present study were to test the hypothesis that distinct metabolic profiles are reflected in GC tissues and to further explore potential biomarkers for GC diagnosis. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was utilized to analyze tissue metabolites from 30 GC patients. A diagnostic model for GC was constructed using orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA), and the metabolomic data were analyzed using the non-parametric Wilcoxon rank sum test to identify the metabolic tissue biomarkers for GC. Over 100 signals were routinely detected in one single total ion current (TIC) chromatogram, and the OPLS-DA model generated from the metabolic profile of the tissues adequately discriminated the GC tissues from the normal mucosae. Among the low-molecular-weight endogenous metabolites, a total of 41 compounds, such as amino acids, organic acids, carbohydrates, fatty acids and steroids, were detected, and 15 differential metabolites were identified with significant difference (p<0.05). A total of 20 variables were noted which contributed to a great extent in the discriminating OPLS-DA model (VIP value >1.0), among which 12 metabolites were identified using both VIP values (VIP >1) and the Wilcoxon test (p<0.05). In conclusion, the identification of the metabolites associated with GC morbidity potentially revealed perturbations of glycolysis, fatty acid β-oxidation, cholesterol and amino acid metabolism. These results suggest that tissue metabolic profiles have great potential in detecting GC and may aid in understanding its underlying mechanisms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3892/or.2011.1302DOI Listing
August 2011

Meta-analysis of laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy and conventional open distal gastrectomy for early gastric cancer.

Chin J Cancer 2010 Apr;29(4):349-54

Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, the Sixth Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510655, PR China.

Background And Objective: With the application of laparoscopy, laparoscopic gastrectomy for the treatment of patients with early gastric cancer has been performed, but the safety and effectiveness of this method need to be explored. This study evaluated the safety and effectiveness of laparoscopy-assisted and conventional open distal gastrectomy for patients with early gastric cancer.

Methods: A search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Chinese Biomedical Database (CBM), and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) identified all the randomized clinical trials that compared laparoscopy-assisted gastrectomy with open distal gastrectomy for patients with early gastric cancer published in the last 10 years. Quality assessment was done on each trial and relevant data were extracted from qualified trials. Meta-analysis was performed using RevMan 4.2.2 software (Cochrane).

Results: Six randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving 218 patients were included. Comparing laparoscopic resection with open resection, results showed less estimated blood loss (WMD (weighted mean difference): -121.86; 95% CI (confidence interval): -145.61, -98.11; P < 0.001), earlier postoperative first flatus (WMD: -0.95; 95% CI: -1.09, -0.81; P < 0.001), and shorter durations of hospital stays (WMD: -2.27; 95%CI: -3.47, -1.06; P = 0.0002), but longer surgery times (WMD: 58.71; 95% CI: 52.69, 64.74; P < 0.001) and fewer lymph nodes dissected (WMD: -3.64; 95% CI: -5.80,-1.47; P = 0.001). There was no significant difference between the two groups in postoperative complications (OR (odds ratio): 0.57; 95% CI: 0.31,1.03; P = 0.06).

Conclusions: The short-term outcome of laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy for patients with early gastric cancer is superior to the open procedure, but its long-term outcome should be proven by further outcomes of RCTs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5732/cjc.009.10548DOI Listing
April 2010

Development of a real-time PCR method for the detection of bacterial colonization in rat models of severe acute pancreatitis.

Chin Med J (Engl) 2010 Feb;123(3):326-31

Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Sixth Affiliated Hospital (Gastrointestinal & Anal Hospital) of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510655, China.

Background: Techniques for the fast and accurate detection of bacterial infection are critical for early diagnosis, prevention and treatment of bacterial translocation in clinical severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). In this study, the availability of a real-time PCR method in detection of bacterial colonization in SAP rat models was investigated.

Methods: Samples of blood, mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), pancreas and liver from 24 specific pathogen-free rats (8 in a control group, 16 in a SAP group) were detected for bacterial infection rates both by agar plate culture and a real-time PCR method, and the results were made contrast.

Results: Bacterial infection rates of the blood, MLN, pancreas and liver in the SAP group and the control group by the two different methods were almost the same, which were 5/16, 12/16, 15/16, 12/16 in the SAP group compared with 0/8, 1/8, 0/8, 0/8 in the control group by agar plate culture, while 5/16, 10/16, 13/16, 12/16 and 0/8, 1/8, 0/8, 0/8 respectively by a real-time PCR method. Bacterial number was estimated by real-time PCR, which showed that in the same mass of tissues, the pancreas contained more bacteria than the other three kinds of organs in SAP rats (P < 0.01), that may be due to the edema, necrosis and hemorrhage existing in the pancreas, making it easier for bacteria to invade and breed.

Conclusion: Fast and accurate detection of bacterial translocation in SAP rat models could be carried out by a real-time PCR procedure.
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February 2010

A simple taurocholate-induced model of severe acute pancreatitis in rats.

World J Gastroenterol 2009 Dec;15(45):5732-9

Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, the Sixth Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, China.

Aim: To investigate gut barrier damage and intestinal bacteria translocation in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), a simple rat model of SAP was induced and studied.

Methods: Pancreatitis was induced by uniformly distributed injection of 3.8% Na taurocholate (1 mL/kg) beneath the pancreatic capsule. Rats in the control group were injected with normal saline in the identical location.

Results: Serum amylase, plasma endotoxin, intestinal permeability, and pancreatitis pathology scores were all markedly higher in the pancreatitis group than in the control group (P < 0.01). The bacterial infection rate was significantly higher in the SAP group than in the control group (P < 0.01), observed in parallel by both bacterial culture and real-time polymerase chain reaction. Acute damage of the pancreas was observed histologically in SAP rats, showing interstitial edema, leukocyte infiltration, acinar cell necrosis and hemorrhage. The microstructure of the intestinal mucosa of SAP rats appeared to be destroyed with loose, shortened microvilli and rupture of the intercellular junction, as shown by electron microscopy.

Conclusion: Significant gut barrier damage and intestinal bacterial translocation were definitely observed with few potential study confounders in this SAP rat model, suggesting that it may be an appropriate animal model for study of gut barrier damage and bacterial translocation in SAP.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2789229PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.3748/wjg.15.5732DOI Listing
December 2009

Expression and localization of activin receptor-interacting protein 2 in mouse tissues.

Gen Comp Endocrinol 2009 Apr 1;161(2):276-82. Epub 2009 Feb 1.

Department of Immunology, Norman Bethune College of Medicine, Jilin University, Changchun, China.

Activin plays important roles in reproductive tissues as a stimulator of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) secretion. Activin receptor-interacting protein 2 (ARIP2) has been recently identified in mouse tissues as a regulatory protein of activin signal transduction. However, the localization and function of ARIP2 are not well characterized. In this study, we found that ARIP2 mRNA and protein were widely expressed in mouse tissues by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and Western blotting. The immunoreactivities of ARIP2 were mainly localized at myocardial cells of heart, Leydig cells in testis, macrophages and epithelial cells of bronchus in lung, renal tubule and collecting tubule, pancreatic islet, adrenal gland, adenohypophysis and hypothalamus by immunohistochemical staining. Furthermore, ARIP2 overexpression down-regulated signal transduction induced by activin A in pituitary gonadotroph LbetaT2 cells and inhibited FSH secretion from primary cultured anterior pituitary cells induced by activin A. These findings suggest that ARIP2 is widely distributed in various tissues and may be a negative regulator of activin action in pituitary cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ygcen.2009.01.020DOI Listing
April 2009

[Effects of lead exposure on protein kinase C and calmodulin expression in hippocampus of baby-rats].

Zhonghua Lao Dong Wei Sheng Zhi Ye Bing Za Zhi 2008 Aug;26(8):465-7

School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070, China.

Objective: To observe the effect of chronic lead contaminant on protein expression of protein kinase (PKC) and calmodulin (CaM) in hippocampus of baby-rats.

Methods: The Wistar pregnant rats were randomly divided into 3 groups fed with distilled water and lead-contained water (0.2% and 1.0% lead acetate) respectively. The lead exposure period ranged from the 0 day of pregnancy to the offspring weaned. Then the baby-rats were fed with lead water the same as their mothers. Pups were killed at postnatal day 8 and 50 respectively. Atomic absorption spectrometry was used to determine lead content of rats' brain. Western-blotting was used to observe protein expression of PKC and CaM in hippocampus of baby-rats.

Results: The brain lead content of test groups was much higher than that of the control group in the same growth period (P < 0.01). The content of brain lead in rats of postnatal day 50 was significantly higher than that of rats of postnatal day 8 (P < 0.01). Compared with control group, PKC and CaM protein expressions of chronic lead exposure baby-rats in the hippocampus were down trend (P < 0.05).

Conclusion: The decrease of PKC and CaM protein expression level in hippocampus might be one of the molecular mechanisms of lead induced impairment of learning and memory.
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August 2008

[Effects of lead exposure on acid-sensing ion channel in hippocampus of baby-rats].

Zhonghua Lao Dong Wei Sheng Zhi Ye Bing Za Zhi 2008 Dec;26(12):729-32

Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070, China.

Objective: To observe the effects of chronic lead exposure on mRNA and protein expression of ASIC1a, ASIC2a, ASIC2b in hippocampus of baby-rats.

Methods: The Wistar pregnant rats were randomly divided into 3 groups fed with distilled water or lead contained water (0.2% and 1.0% lead acetate) respectively, 5 rats in each group. The lead-exposure ranged from the 0 day of pregnancy to the offspring weaned. Then the baby-rats were fed with lead water like their mothers and killed at postnatal day 8 or 50. Atomic absorption spectrometry was used to determine lead content in the brain. RT-PCR and Western blotting were used to observe mRNA and protein expression of ASIC1a, ASIC2a and ASIC2b in their hippocampus respectively.

Results: The brain lead content of test groups was higher than that of the control group (P < 0.01), and the lead content of the postnatal day 50 was higher than that in postnatal day 8 (P < 0.01). Compared with the control group, ASIC1a mRNA expression of 1.0% lead exposure in the hippocampus was uptrend (P < 0.01), ASIC1a protein expression of each test group was downtrend (P < 0.05), while for ASIC2a and ASIC2b mRNA and protein, there was no significant differences observed (P > 0.05).

Conclusion: ASIC1a expression in hippocampus can be changed by chronic lead exposure.
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December 2008

[Effects of lead exposure on protein kinase C and calmodulin expression in hippocampus and neurobehavioral function of baby rats].

Zhonghua Lao Dong Wei Sheng Zhi Ye Bing Za Zhi 2008 Mar;26(3):139-42

Department of Toxicology, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Tianjin 300011, China.

Objective: To observe the effect of chronic lead contaminant on mRNA expression of protein kinase C (PKC) and calmodulin (CaM) in hippocampus of baby rats.

Methods: The Wistar pregnant rats were randomly divided into 3 groups fed with distilled water and lead contained water (0.2% and 1.0% lead acetate) respectively. The lead exposure period was from the 0 day of pregnancy to the day when the offspring weaned. Then the baby rats were fed with lead water the same as their mothers. The cliff avoidance reflex within postnatal day 8 and step down test at postnatal day 50 were performed. Then pups were killed at postnatal day 8 and 50 respectively. Atomic absorption spectrometry was used to determine lead content of rats' brain. RT-PCR was used to observe mRNA expression of PKC and CaM in hippocampus of baby rats.

Results: The brain lead content of test groups were much higher than that of the control group. The completion rate of cliff avoidance reflex and the score of step down test of test groups were lower than those in the control group (P < 0.05). Compared with control group, PKC and CaM mRNA expression of chronic lead exposure baby rats in the hippocampus had the down trend (P < 0.05).

Conclusion: The decrease of PKC and CaM mRNA expression level in hippocampus has a great link with the impairment of learning and memory induced by lead in baby rats, which might be one of the molecule mechanisms of lead induced impairment of learning and memory.
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March 2008

Inhibitory effect of activin A on activation of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated mouse macrophage RAW264.7 cells.

Cytokine 2008 Apr 5;42(1):85-91. Epub 2008 Mar 5.

Department of Immunology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Jilin University, 126 Xinmin Street, Changchun, Jilin 130021, China.

Activin A is a member of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) superfamily, which is also named restrictin-P, and can inhibit the secretion of nitric oxide (NO) and interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) from LPS-activated mouse macrophages. In this study, the regulation effect and possible mechanism of activin A as an anti-inflammatory factor on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated macrophages were investigated in vitro. It was observed that activin A could not only decrease the secretion of IL-1beta and NO, as well as the mRNA expressions of IL-1beta and iNOS, but also suppress the pinocytosis of mouse macrophage cell line RAW264.7 cells induced by LPS. In addition, activin A could obviously reduce the expressions of CD68 and CD14, as well as Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) on RAW264.7 cells induced by LPS, but could not influence the proliferation of RAW264.7 cells. These findings suggest that activin A may play an important down-regulation role in inflammatory factor production and phagocytosis of the activated macrophages via suppressing the maturation of LPS-induced macrophages or LPS-TLR4 signal transduction.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cyto.2008.01.010DOI Listing
April 2008

Regulation of activin receptor-interacting protein 2 expression in mouse hepatoma Hepa1-6 cells and its relationship with collagen type IV.

World J Gastroenterol 2007 Nov;13(41):5501-5

Department of Immunology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun 130021, Jilin Province, China.

Aim: To investigate the regulation of activin receptor-interacting protein 2 (ARIP2) expression and its possible relationships with collagen type IV (collagen IV) in mouse hepatoma cell line Hepal-6 cells.

Methods: The ARIP2 mRNA expression kinetics in Hepal-6 cells was detected by RT-PCR, and its regulation factors were analyzed by treatment with signal transduction activators such as phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), forskolin and A23187. After pcDNA3-ARIP2 was transfected into Hepal-6 cells, the effects of ARIP2 overexpression on activin type II receptor (ActRII) and collagen IV expression were evaluated.

Results: The expression levels of ARIP2 mRNA in Hapel-6 cells were elevated in time-dependent manner 12 h after treatment with activin A and endotoxin LPS, but not changed evidently in the early stage of stimulation (2 or 4 h). The ARIP2 mRNA expression was increased after stimulated with signal transduction activators such as PMA and forskolin in Hepal-6 cells, whereas decreased after treatment with A23187 (25.3% +/- 5.7% vs 48.1% +/- 3.6%, P < 0.01). ARIP2 overexpression could remarkably suppress the expression of ActRIIA mRNA in dose-dependent manner, but has no effect on ActRIIB in Hepal-6 cells induced by activin A. Furthermore, we have found that overexpression of ARIP2 could inhibit collagen IV mRNA and protein expressions induced by activin A in Hapel-6 cells.

Conclusion: These findings suggest that ARIP2 expression can be influenced by various factors. ARIP2 may participate in the negative feedback regulation of signal transduction in the late stage by affecting the expression of ActRIIA and play an important role in regulation of development of liver fibrosis induced by activin.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4171287PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.3748/wjg.v13.i41.5501DOI Listing
November 2007

Effects of activin A on the activities of the mouse peritoneal macrophages.

Cell Mol Immunol 2005 Feb;2(1):63-7

Department of Immunology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun, China.

Activin A is a kind of pre-inflammatory factor that belongs to the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) superfamily. To investigate the effect and mechanism of activin A on the activities of mouse macrophages, the secretion of NO in the supernatant of cultured mouse peritoneal macrophages was examined by NO assay kit, and the expression of iNOS, ActRIIA and ARIP2 mRNA in mouse peritoneal macrophages was analyzed by RT-PCR. The results showed that activin A stimulated the secretion of NO and the expression of iNOS mRNA in non-activated mouse macrophages in a time- and dose-dependent manner. In contrast, activin A in the same concentration inhibited the secretion of NO in LPS-activated mouse macrophages in a dose-dependent manner. ActRIIA was highly expressed on macrophages, and activin A upregulated the ActRIIA mRNA expression in macrophages. Anti-ActRIIA antibody can block the secretion of NO from the macrophages stimulated by activin A. Furthermore, RT-PCR analysis revealed that activin A enhanced the ARIP2 mRNA expression in macrophages. These results indicated that Activin A may be a weak activator compared with LPS to mouse macrophages, and activin A may modulate the secretion of NO through ActRIIA-ARIP2 signal pathway in mouse macrophages.
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February 2005

Effects of Ce on the short-term biocompatibility of Ti-Fe-Mo-Mn-Nb-Zr alloy for dental materials.

J Mater Sci Mater Med 2004 Jun;15(6):687-91

College of Materials Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130025, People's Republic of China.

Effects of Ce on the short-term biocompatibility of Ti-Fe-Mo-Mn-Nb-Zr alloy designed for implant materials were studied by acute toxicity test, hemolytic test, and MTT assay. The elements and their concentration in surface films and extraction media of Ti alloys were investigated with XPS and ICP, respectively. The primary compositions of the surface films of Ti alloys with 0.3% Ce and without Ce were TiO2 and Nb2O5. There were 0.2 mg/l Fe and 0.16 mg/l Mn in the extraction medium of Ti alloy without Ce, while 0.27 mg/l Fe and 0.87 mg/l Mn in the extraction medium of Ti alloy with 0.3% Ce. The concentrations of Fe and Mn in the medium were too low to have any significant effects on human health. There was no sign of cytotoxicity in these tests. The cytotoxicity levels of Ti alloys without Ce and with 0.3% Ce were graded 0 and 1, respectively. The hemolytic degrees of Ti alloys without Ce and with 0.3% Ce were 0.558% and 0.67%, respectively. The cells being incubated in the extraction medium were normal. These phenomena indicated that Ce was innocuous within the concentration range of this study. In addition, the hemolytic ratio and toxicity level of Ti alloy with 0.3% Ce were a little higher than that of Ti alloy without Ce. This meant that Ce would slightly increase the toxicity of Ti alloy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/b:jmsm.0000030210.83891.d4DOI Listing
June 2004

[4 cases of pneumonectomy in silicosis misdiagnosed as lung cancer].

Zhonghua Lao Dong Wei Sheng Zhi Ye Bing Za Zhi 2003 Jun;21(3):232

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June 2003

[Study on the relationship between activin A, follistatin and preeclampsia].

Zhonghua Fu Chan Ke Za Zhi 2003 Nov;38(11):676-9

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Second College of China Medical University, Shenyang 110004, China.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship of maternal serum activin A, follistatin and their mRNA expression in placenta with preeclampsia at term.

Methods: Twenty women with preeclampsia were enrolled in this study. Twenty healthy pregnancies matched for gestational ages were recruited as control group. Maternal serum activin A and follistatin in two groups were compared by using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Placental tissues were obtained from preeclampsia and healthy control groups for analysis of activin A mRNA and follistatin mRNA expression by using quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Linear correlation analysis was used to explore the relationship between placental avtivin A mRNA and maternal serum activin A concentrations.

Results: (1) Maternal serum concentrations of activin A are significantly increased in preeclampsia group (33.7 +/- 6.6) micro g/L compared with control group (9.9 +/- 2.1) micro g/L (P < 0.01). Maternal serum follistatin levels were not different between preeclampsia group (5.1 +/- 0.6) micro g/L and control group (4.7 +/- 0.3) micro g/L (P > 0.05). (2) The placentas of preeclampsia group expressed activin A mRNA levels at significantly higher levels 1.11 +/- 0.21 than that of control group 0.61 +/- 0.17 (P < 0.01). The expression of follistatin mRNA were not different between preeclampsia group 0.57 +/- 0.31 and control group 0.54 +/- 0.27 (P > 0.05). (3) In preeclampsia and control groups, maternal serum activin A concentrations had a significant positive correlation with activin A mRNA expression in placentas (r = 0.89, P < 0.01).

Conclusion: These results suggest that activin A is increased in women with preeclampsia, the elevated levels of activin A due to increased placental production.
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November 2003

[Concentration of follistatin in maternal serum at term and its expression in placenta].

Zhonghua Fu Chan Ke Za Zhi 2003 Jul;38(7):390-3

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Second Affiliated Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001, China.

Objective: To investigate the possible origin and role of follistatin (FS) in pregnancy.

Methods: The maternal serum FS levels in menstrual cycle, first trimester (8 - 12 weeks) and term (38 - 41 weeks) were determined by a specific two-site enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method was utilized to semi-quantitatively determine FS mRNA levels in the ovaries and placentas.

Results: Maternal serum FS level at term was significantly higher than that in the first trimester of pregnancy and that in normal women during the menstrual cycle (180 +/- 26) micro g/L, (4.4 +/- 2.1) micro g/L, (1.5 +/- 2.2) micro g/L, (respectively P < 0.001). Both placentas and ovaries expressed FS mRNA. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed that the expression levels of FS mRNA in placenta were higher than that in ovary of same period, but lower than that in ovary of menstrual phase (0.8 +/- 0.4, 0.4 +/- 0.3, 0.93 +/- 0.13, respectively P < 0.05).

Conclusion: Fetal-placental unit may be the major source of maternal serum FS. The relatively higher levels of FS in the placentas at term may reflect important roles in modulating the development of embryo and the function of placenta.
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July 2003