Publications by authors named "Zhi-Qin Gao"

15 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Liver-Targeting and pH-Sensitive Sulfated Hyaluronic Acid Mixed Micelles for Hepatoma Therapy.

Int J Nanomedicine 2019 2;14:9437-9452. Epub 2019 Dec 2.

School of Bioscience and Technology, Weifang Medical University, Weifang, Shandong, People's Republic of China.

Background: The tumor-targeting ability and pH-sensitive properties of intelligent drug delivery systems are crucial for effective drug delivery and anti-tumor therapy.

Methods: In this study, sHA-DOX/HA-GA mixed micelles were designed with the following properties: sulfated hyaluronic acid (sHA) was synthesized to block cell migration by inhibiting HAase; sHA-DOX conjugates were synthesized via pH-sensitive hydrazone bond to realize DOX-sensitive release. The introduction of HA-GA conjugate could improve active-targeting ability and cellular uptake.

Results: The results showed that the mixed micelles possessed a nearly spherical shape, nanoscale particle size (217.70±0.89 nm), narrow size distribution (PDI=0.07±0.04), negative zeta potential (-31.87±0.61 mV) and pH-dependent DOX release. In addition, the sHA-DOX/HA-GA micelles exhibited concentration-dependent cytotoxicities against liver carcinoma cells (HepG2) and HeLa cells, and were shown to be effectively taken up by HepG2 cells by confocal microscopy analysis. Furthermore, the in vivo anti-tumor study showed that mixed micelles had a superior anti-tumor effect compared to that of free DOX. Further evidence obtained from the hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunohistochemistry analysis also demonstrated that sHA-DOX/HA-GA exhibited stronger tumor inhibition and lower systemic toxicity than free DOX.

Conclusion: The sHA-DOX/HA-GA mixed micelles could be a potential drug delivery system for anti-hepatoma therapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJN.S214528DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6896933PMC
February 2020

Duodenal-Jejunal Bypass Ameliorates Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus by Activating Insulin Signaling and Improving Glucose Utilization in the Brain.

Obes Surg 2020 01;30(1):279-289

Department of Pharmacology, Laboratory of Applied Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Weifang Medical University, 7166 Baotong West Street, Weifang, 261053, China.

Background: Duodenal-jejunal bypass (DJB) can dramatically improve type 2 diabetes independent of weight loss and food restriction. Increasing evidence has demonstrated that brain insulin signaling plays an important role in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes. This study explores whether the antidiabetic effect of DJB is involved in brain insulin signaling activation and brain glucose utilization.

Methods: A diabetic rat model was established by high-fat and high-glucose diet. DJB or sham surgery was performed in diabetic rats. 18F-FDG PET scanning was used to detect glucose uptake in different organs, particularly in the brain. The levels of glucose transporters, glucose utilization-related proteins (HK1 and PFK2), insulin, and insulin signaling pathway-related proteins (InsR, IRS1/2, PI3K, and p-Akt) in the brain tissues were evaluated and analyzed.

Results: The results showed that DJB significantly improved basal glycemic parameters and reversed the decreasing glucose uptake in the brains of type 2 diabetic rats. DJB significantly increased not only the expression levels of brain insulin, IRS1/2, PI3K, and p-Akt but also the levels of the glucose utilization enzymes HK1 and PFK2 in the brain.

Conclusion: These results indicate that enhanced brain insulin signaling transduction and brain glucose utilization play important roles in the antidiabetic effect of DJB.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11695-019-04153-3DOI Listing
January 2020

Successful Sequential Treatment with Itraconazole and ALA-PDT for Cutaneous Granuloma by Candida albicans: A Case Report and Literature Review.

Mycopathologia 2018 Oct 16;183(5):829-834. Epub 2018 May 16.

Institute of Photomedicine, Shanghai Dermatology Hospital, Shanghai, China.

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a process that combines a photosensitizing drug and light and promotes phototoxic responses in target cells, mainly via oxidative damage. Antifungal photodynamic therapy has been successfully employed against Candida species, dermatophytes, and deep mycoses. We present a case of a cutaneous granuloma caused by C. albicans treated with 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-PDT. A 64-year-old man presented with two plaques on his right hand and wrist for 2 years. The diagnosis was made based on histopathology, mycology, and molecular identification of paraffin-embedded tissues. The patient was treated with itraconazole for 1 month and two sessions of ALA-PDT. After 2 months of follow-up, the patient was cured and has not experienced any recurrence to date. ALA-PDT was well tolerated in this patient with little pain. In general, application of PDT in mycoses is safe and effective in most cases. ALA-PDT is a good choice for inactivation of C. albicans.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11046-018-0267-4DOI Listing
October 2018

pH-Responsive Hyaluronic Acid-Based Mixed Micelles for the Hepatoma-Targeting Delivery of Doxorubicin.

Int J Mol Sci 2016 Mar 30;17(4):364. Epub 2016 Mar 30.

School of Bioscience and Technology, Weifang Medical University, Wei Fang 261053, Shandong, China.

The tumor targetability and stimulus responsivity of drug delivery systems are crucial in cancer diagnosis and treatment. In this study, hepatoma-targeting mixed micelles composed of a hyaluronic acid-glycyrrhetinic acid conjugate and a hyaluronic acid-l-histidine conjugate (HA-GA/HA-His) were prepared through ultrasonic dispersion. The formation and characterization of the mixed micelles were confirmed via ¹H-NMR, particle size, and ζ potential measurements. The in vitro cellular uptake of the micelles was evaluated using human liver carcinoma (HepG2) cells. The antitumor effect of doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded micelles was investigated in vitro and in vivo. Results indicated that the DOX-loaded HA-GA/HA-His micelles showed a pH-dependent controlled release and were remarkably absorbed by HepG2 cells. Compared with free DOX, the DOX-loaded HA-GA/HA-His micelles showed a higher cytotoxicity to HepG2 cells. Moreover, the micelles effectively inhibited tumor growth in H22 cell-bearing mice. These results suggest that the HA-GA/HA-His mixed micelles are a good candidate for drug delivery in the prevention and treatment of hepatocarcinoma.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms17040364DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4848880PMC
March 2016

Neurophysiological mechanisms of bradykinin-evoked mucosal chloride secretion in guinea pig small intestine.

World J Gastrointest Pathophysiol 2016 Feb;7(1):150-9

Mei-Hua Qu, Ting-Kun Zhao, Chun-Yan Fang, Shu-Mei Mao, Zhi-Qin Gao, Key Lab of Applied Pharmacology in Universities of Shandong, Weifang Medical University, Weifang 261053, Shandong Province, China.

Aim: To investigate the mechanism for bradykinin (BK) to stimulate intestinal secretomotor neurons and intestinal chloride secretion.

Methods: Muscle-stripped guinea pig ileal preparations were mounted in Ussing flux chambers for the recording of short-circuit current (Isc). Basal Isc and Isc stimulated by BK when preincubated with the BK receptors antagonist and other chemicals were recorded using the Ussing chamber system. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production in the intestine was determined by enzyme immunologic assay (EIA).

Results: Application of BK or B2 receptor (B2R) agonist significantly increased the baseline Isc compared to the control. B2R antagonist, tetrodotoxin and scopolamine (blockade of muscarinic receptors) significantly suppressed the increase in Isc evoked by BK. The BK-evoked Isc was suppressed by cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 or COX-2 specific inhibitor as well as nonselective COX inhibitors. Preincubation of submucosa/mucosa preparations with BK for 10 min significantly increased PGE2 production and this was abolished by the COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitors. The BK-evoked Isc was suppressed by nonselective EP receptors and EP4 receptor antagonists, but selective EP1 receptor antagonist did not have a significant effect on the BK-evoked Isc. Inhibitors of PLC, PKC, calmodulin or CaMKII failed to suppress BK-induced PGE2 production.

Conclusion: The results suggest that BK stimulates neurogenic chloride secretion in the guinea pig ileum by activating B2R, through COX increasing PGE2 production. The post-receptor transduction cascade includes activation of PLC, PKC, CaMK, IP3 and MAPK.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4291/wjgp.v7.i1.150DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4753181PMC
February 2016

miR-93 promotes TGF-β-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition through downregulation of NEDD4L in lung cancer cells.

Tumour Biol 2016 Apr 18;37(4):5645-51. Epub 2015 Nov 18.

Department of Radiology, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Room 1014, 460 W. 12th Ave, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA.

The level of microRNA-93 (miR-93) in tumors has been recently reported to be negatively correlated with survival of lung cancer patients. Considering that the most devastating aspect of lung cancer is metastasis, which can be promoted by transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), we sought to determine whether miR-93 is involved in this process. Here, we report that a previously unidentified target of miR-93, neural precursor cell expressed developmentally downregulated gene 4-like (NEDD4L), is able to mediate TGF-β-mediated EMT in lung cancer cells. miR-93 binds directly to the 3'-UTR of the NEDD4L messenger RNA (mRNA), leading to a downregulation of NEDD4L expression at the protein level. We next demonstrated that the downregulation of NEDD4L enhanced, while overexpression of NEDD4L reduced TGF-β signaling, reflected by increased phosphorylation of SMAD2 in the lung cancer cell line after TGF-β treatment. Furthermore, overexpression of miR-93 in lung cancer cells promoted TGF-β-induced EMT through downregulation of NEDD4L. The analysis of publicly available gene expression array datasets indicates that low NEDD4L expression correlates with poor outcomes among patients with lung cancer, further supporting the oncogenic role of miR-93 in lung tumorigenesis and metastasis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13277-015-4328-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6528179PMC
April 2016

The rapid antidepressant effect of ketamine in rats is associated with down-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the hippocampus.

Ups J Med Sci 2015 28;120(4):241-8. Epub 2015 Jul 28.

c 3 Department of Anesthesiology, Jinling Hospital, School of Medicine, Nanjing University , Nanjing, China.

Objectives: Active inflammatory responses play an important role in the pathogenesis of depression. We hypothesized that the rapid antidepressant effect of ketamine is associated with the down-regulation of pro-inflammatory mediators.

Methods: Forty-eight rats were equally randomized into six groups (a control and five chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) groups) and given either saline or 10 mg/kg ketamine, respectively. The forced swimming test was performed, and the hippocampus was subsequently harvested for the determination of levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), kynurenine (KYN), and tryptophan (TRP).

Results: CUMS induced depression-like behaviours and up-regulated the hippocampal levels of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, IDO, and the KYN/TRP ratio, which were attenuated by a sub-anaesthetic dose of ketamine.

Conclusion: CUMS-induced depression-like behaviours are associated with a reduction in hippocampal inflammatory mediators, whereas ketamine's antidepressant effect is associated with a down-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the rat hippocampus.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/03009734.2015.1060281DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4816884PMC
August 2016

Preliminary detection of the anti‑tumour activity of indoline‑2,3‑dione derivative DH‑12a targeting aminopeptidase N.

Mol Med Rep 2014 Nov 9;10(5):2681-8. Epub 2014 Sep 9.

Pharmacy and Biological Science College, Weifang Medical University, Weifang, Shandong 261053, P.R. China.

Aminopeptidase N (APN) is important in tumour processes. The present study detected the anti‑tumour activity of the novel APN inhibitor DH‑12a, which is an indoline‑2,3‑dione derivative. In the present study, Bestatin, a clinical APN inhibitor was used as a positive control. The expression of APN in the ES-2 and 3AO cell lines were assessed using flow cytometry and the drug inhibition constants of DH‑12a (Ki=13.15 µM) and Bestatin (Ki=16.57 µM) were assessed using a double reciprocal method of competitive inhibition. The in vitro effects of DH‑12a on cell proliferation were assessed using a 3‑(4,5‑dimethyl‑thiazol‑2‑yl)‑2,5‑diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay on human cell lines of ES‑2 (IC50=43.8 µM), A549 (inhibition rate=41.5% at 160 µM DH‑12a), HL60 (inhibition rate=47.83% at 160 µM DH‑12a) and 3AO (IC50=70.2 µM). The inhibition rates were consistently higher than those of Bestatin. The effects of DH‑12a on cell migration (inhibition rates in ES‑2 cells and 3AO cells were 56.4 and 76.5%, respectively at 15 µM) and invasion (inhibition rates in ES‑2 cells and 3AO cells were 75.6 and 66.5%, respectively at 15 µM) were assessed using transwell plates. The in vivo effects of DH‑12a on tumour proliferation and lung tumour metastasis were determined using an H22 xenograft mice model, where DH‑12a was administered in combination with genotoxic 5‑fluorouracil. The anti‑tumour activities of DH‑12a in vivo were also greater than those of Bestatin. In conclusion, the in vitro effects of DH‑12a on tumour proliferation, migration and invasion were consistent with the in vivo effects. In addition, DH‑12a exhibited greater anti‑tumour properties compared with Bestatin.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3892/mmr.2014.2552DOI Listing
November 2014

Well-oriented ZZ-PS-tag with high Fc-binding onto polystyrene surface for controlled immobilization of capture antibodies.

Anal Chim Acta 2013 May 15;776:74-8. Epub 2013 Mar 15.

School of Pharmacy & Biology, Weifang Medical University, Weifang 261053, PR China.

The site specificity and bioactivity retention of antibodies immobilized on a solid substrate are crucial requirements for solid phase immunoassays. A fusion protein between an immunoglobulin G (IgG)-binding protein (ZZ protein) and a polystyrene-binding peptide (PS-tag) was constructed, and then used to develop a simple method for the oriented immobilization of the ZZ protein onto a PS support by the specific attachment of the PS-tag onto a hydrophilic PS. The orientation of intact IgG was achieved via the interaction of the ZZ protein and the constant fragment (Fc), thereby displayed the Fab fragment for binding antigen. The interaction between rabbit IgG anti-horseradish peroxidase (anti-HRP) and its binding partner HRP was analyzed. Results showed that the oriented ZZ-PS-tag yielded an IgG-binding activity that is fivefold higher than that produced by the passive immobilization of the ZZ protein. The advantage of the proposed immunoassay strategy was demonstrated through an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, in which monoclonal mouse anti-goat IgG and HRP-conjugated rabbit F(ab')2 anti-goat IgG were used to detect goat IgG. The ZZ-PS-tag presented a tenfold higher sensitivity and a wider linear range than did the passively immobilized ZZ protein. The proposed approach may be an attractive strategy for a broad range of applications involving the oriented immobilization of intact IgGs onto PS supports, in which only one type of phi-PS (ZZ-PS-tag) surface is used.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aca.2013.03.017DOI Listing
May 2013

Preparation of a bio-immunoreagent between ZZ affibody and enhanced green fluorescent protein for immunofluorescence applications.

World J Microbiol Biotechnol 2012 Mar 3;28(3):1281-5. Epub 2011 May 3.

School of basic medicine, Weifang medical University, 261053 Weifang, People's Republic of China.

In the present study, we constructed plasmid pUC-ZZ-EGFP to express Pro-ZZ-EGFP using ZZ peptide (a synthetic artificial IgG-Fc-fragment-binding protein derived from the B domain of staphylococcal protein A) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Without induction with isopropyl-β-D: -thiogalactopyranoside, the chimeric protein was effectively expressed in Escherichia coli HB101. Its affinity constant binding IgG was 2.6 × 10(8) M(-1) obtained by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, indicating that the ZZ peptide retains the native structure in Pro-ZZ-EGFP. The application of immunofluorescence assay for detecting the Mycoplasma pneumoniae IgG antibody, Pro-ZZ-EGFP, exhibited a good signal comparable in brightness and fluorescence pattern with the signal generated using the fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled anti-human IgG. The result indicates that Pro-ZZ-EGFP possesses great potential for clinical immunofluorescence IgG test as an alternative versatile fluorescent antibody.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11274-011-0761-zDOI Listing
March 2012

Tramadol pretreatment enhances ketamine-induced antidepressant effects and increases mammalian target of rapamycin in rat hippocampus and prefrontal cortex.

J Biomed Biotechnol 2012 8;2012:175619. Epub 2012 Apr 8.

Department of Anesthesiology, School of Medicine, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing University, Jiangsu, Nanjing, China.

Several lines of evidence have demonstrated that acute administration of ketamine elicits fast-acting antidepressant effects. Moreover, tramadol also has potential antidepressant effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of pretreatment with tramadol on ketamine-induced antidepressant activity and was to determine the expression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in rat hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Rats were intraperitoneally administrated with ketamine at the dose of 10 mg/kg or saline 1 h before the second episode of the forced swimming test (FST). Tramadol or saline was intraperitoneally pretreated 30 min before the former administration of ketamine or saline. The locomotor activity and the immobility time of FST were both measured. After that, rats were sacrificed to determine the expression of mTOR in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Tramadol at the dose of 5 mg/kg administrated alone did not elicit the antidepressant effects. More importantly, pretreatment with tramadol enhanced the ketamine-induced antidepressant effects and upregulated the expression of mTOR in rat hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Pretreatment with tramadol enhances the ketamine-induced antidepressant effects, which is associated with the increased expression of mTOR in rat hippocampus and prefrontal cortex.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/175619DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3336144PMC
October 2012

[ZNF185 gene cloning and the localization in mouse testis].

Xi Bao Yu Fen Zi Mian Yi Xue Za Zhi 2010 Oct;26(10):973-5

Department of Cell Biology, Weifang Medical University, Weifang 261053, China.

Aim: we Clone the ZNF185 gene and detect the position of ZNF185 in the mouse testis.

Methods: extracted from mouse testis RNA, by RT-PCR, and then the obtained fragment was cloned and identified; extracted from mouse liver, testis and ovary proteins were Western blot analysis; preparation of frozen sections of mouse testes, immunofluorescence techniques analysis.

Results: (1) ZNF185 gene cloning was correct. (2) Western blot showed that the most abundant in the testes ZNF185. (3) Immunofluorescence showed, ZNF185 located in Leydig cells and sperm, Leydig cells in the weak, and in round spermatids and mature sperm were highly expressed.

Conclusion: the gene cloning of ZNF185 was successful and initially proved the position of ZNF185 in the mouse testis.
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October 2010

Diffusion-weighted imaging of prostate cancer: correlation between apparent diffusion coefficient values and tumor proliferation.

J Magn Reson Imaging 2009 Jun;29(6):1360-6

Department of Radiology, Weifang Medical University, Weifang, People's Republic of China.

Purpose: To investigate whether the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of prostate cancer (PCa) are able to reflect tumor proliferation.

Materials And Methods: The clinical and pathological information for 38 patients with PCa and 33 patients with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) were studied. Examination of the patients was performed using a 1.5 T superconducting magnetic scanner equipped with a pelvic phased-array multicoil. Diffusion-weighted images (DWIs) were acquired using an echo-planar imaging sequence. The ADC values of PCa, BPH, and peripheral zone (PZ) were calculated. The cellularity of PCa was recorded based on hematoxylin and eosin staining. The proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was detected using an immunohistochemical technique.

Results: The ADC values of PCa, BPH, and PZ were 49.32 +/- 12.68 x 10(-5) mm(2)/s, 86.73 +/- 26.75 x 10(-5) mm(2)/s, and 126.25 +/- 27.21 x 10(-5) mm(2)/s, respectively. The ADC values of PCa were lower than those of BPH and PZ (P < 0.05). The cellularity and PCNA labeling index (LI) of PCa were higher than those of BPH (P < 0.05). The ADC values of PCa were negatively correlated with those of cellularity and PCNA LI (r = -0.646 and -0.446, respectively; P < 0.05).

Conclusion: The ADC values of PCa can reveal the differences in proliferative activity between PCa and BPH. These values are therefore able to predict the proliferative rate of variously differentiated prostate cancers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmri.21797DOI Listing
June 2009

1H-MRSI of prostate cancer: the relationship between metabolite ratio and tumor proliferation.

Eur J Radiol 2010 Feb 13;73(2):345-51. Epub 2008 Dec 13.

Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, Shandong University, 324# JingWu Road, Jinan 250021, PR China.

Purpose: To investigate whether 1H-MRSI can be used to predict the proliferative activity of prostate cancer.

Materials And Methods: Thirty-eight patients with prostate cancer (PCa) and thirty-three patients with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) were included in this study. Patients were examined in supine position using a 1.5T superconducting magnetic scanner equipped with a pelvic phased-array multi-coil and CSI-3D-PROSTATE sequence. Commercial software was used to acquire and process MR spectroscopic imaging data. Mean (Cho+Cr)/Cit ratios of PCa, BPH, and peripheral zone (PZ) were calculated. Cellularity of PCa was recorded based on hematoxylin and eosin staining. PCNA was detected using immunohistochemical techniques.

Results: The mean (Cho+Cr)/Cit ratio of the peripheral zone (0.38+/-0.09) was lower than that of BPH (0.51+/-0.19) (P<0.05). The average value of (Cho+Cr)/Cit ratio of prostate cancer was 3.98+/-0.12. The (Cho+Cr)/Cit ratio of prostate cancer was higher than that of the peripheral zone and BPH (P<0.05). The cellularity and PCNA LI of prostate cancer were 12.90+/-4.07% and 72.1+/-19.01%, respectively. The (Cho+Cr)/Cit ratio of prostate cancer positively correlated with tumor cellularity (r=0.582, P=0.027) and PCNA LI (r=0.495, P=0.022).

Conclusion: The (Cho+Cr)/Cit ratio of PCa can reveal the differences in proliferative activity between PCa and BPH. MRSIs are therefore able to predict the proliferative rate of variously differentiated prostate cancers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejrad.2008.10.035DOI Listing
February 2010
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