Publications by authors named "Zhenyi Tian"

10 Publications

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Index-Based Dietary Patterns and Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Systematic Review of Observational Studies.

Adv Nutr 2021 Jun 22. Epub 2021 Jun 22.

Department of Gastroenterology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China.

Diet is one of the most critical factors for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). A whole dietary pattern should be considered when doing nutrient-based research to preserve the potential for synergism between nutrients. Dietary indices are important tools to evaluate diet quality, and we investigated the associations of it with IBD. Fourteen studies on the relation between index-based dietary patterns and IBD were included. 6 studies showed the relation between index-based dietary patterns and IBD risk, 7 studies explored the dietary indices and progression of IBD, and 1 study investigated the relationship between index and all-cause mortality in IBD patients. These results implied that a high score on the Mediterranean diet was negatively associated with risk and progression of IBD. However, a diet with high inflammatory potential could increase risk and aggravate disease activity in IBD. Dietary scores have the potential to evaluate the association between overall diet quality and risk and progression of IBD. Future randomized controlled trials are required to confirm the effect of the change in dietary score. This review was registered at www.crd.york.ac.uk/prospero/ as CRD42020220926.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/advances/nmab069DOI Listing
June 2021

Gut Microbiota Profile in Pediatric Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Systematic Review.

Front Pediatr 2021 2;9:626232. Epub 2021 Feb 2.

Department of Gastroenterology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China.

Accumulating evidence have implicated gut microbiota alterations in pediatric and adult patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); however, the results of different studies are often inconsistent and even contradictory. It is believed that early changes in new-onset and treatment-naïve pediatric patients are more informative. We performed a systematic review to investigate the gut microbiota profiles in pediatric IBD and identify specific microbiota biomarkers associated with this disorder. Electronic databases were searched from inception to 31 July 2020 for studies that observed gut microbiota alterations in pediatric patients with IBD. Study quality was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. A total of 41 original studies investigating gut microbiota profiles in pediatric patients with IBD were included in this review. Several studies have reported a decrease in α-diversity and an overall difference in β-diversity. Although no specific gut microbiota alterations were consistently reported, a gain in and a significant decrease in , and were found in the majority of the included articles. Moreover, there is insufficient data to show specific microbiota bacteria associated with disease activity, location, and behavior in pediatric IBD. This systematic review identified evidence for differences in the abundance of some bacteria in pediatric patients with IBD when compared to patients without IBD; however, no clear overall conclusion could be drawn from the included studies due to inconsistent results and heterogeneous methodologies. Further studies with large samples that follow more rigorous and standardized methodologies are needed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fped.2021.626232DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7884334PMC
February 2021

Gut Microbiota Profiles and Microbial-Based Therapies in Post-operative Crohn's Disease: A Systematic Review.

Front Med (Lausanne) 2020 28;7:615858. Epub 2021 Jan 28.

Department of Gastroenterology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China.

Gut microbiota recolonization after intestinal resection had been reported to be associated with post-operative recurrence in Crohn's disease (CD). However, the results of different studies are inconsistent and even contradictory. In addition, knowledge on the efficacy of microbial-based therapies in preventing post-operative recurrence of CD is limited. Therefore, the aim of this review was to investigate gut microbiota profiles in patients with CD before and after surgery and evaluate microbial-based therapies in preventing post-operative recurrence. Electronic databases were searched from inception to 31 June 2020 using predefined terms. Studies that investigated gut microbiota pre- and post-intestinal resection, and microbial-based therapies in preventing post-operative recurrence, were eligible. Study quality was assessed using either the Newcastle-Ottawa scale or Jadad scoring system. Twelve studies investigating gut microbiota of CD patients suffering from operation, and other 12 studies evaluating the efficacy of antibiotics and probiotics, were included in our review. The mucosa-associated microbiota in surgical biopsy of CD patients is significantly distinct from that in normal mucosa from healthy subjects. Gut microbiota recolonization following surgery might be associated with post-operative recurrence in CD patients. Furthermore, CD patients with post-operative recurrence presented a gain in pro-inflammatory pathogenic bacteria and a loss in short-chain fatty acid-producing bacteria before and after surgery. However, no consistent bacteria or metabolites were found to predict the post-operative recurrence of CD. Additionally, microbial-based therapies are deficient and present restricted widespread clinical utility due to several deficiencies. Recurrence-associated bacteria observed pre- and post- operation might be promising in preventing the post-operative recurrence of CD. Furthermore, potential microbe biomarkers for predicting subsequent disease recurrence should be validated with larger sample sizes using more rigorous and standardized methodologies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmed.2020.615858DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7876235PMC
January 2021

Alterations in short-chain fatty acids and serotonin in irritable bowel syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

BMC Gastroenterol 2021 Jan 6;21(1):14. Epub 2021 Jan 6.

Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China.

Background: Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) and serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) may be associated with the pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). There are some reports of alterations in SCFAs and 5-HT in IBS, but their results are inconsistent. We aimed to perform a meta-analysis to assess alterations in SCFAs and 5-HT in IBS patients and their potential role in the abnormal brain-gut-microbiota (BGM) axis.

Methods: Case-control studies detecting SCFAs and 5-HT in IBS patients were identified from PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and Scopus databases to identify relevant articles up to September 2018. The standardized mean differences (SMDs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of SCFAs and 5-HT were calculated by REVIEW MANAGER 5.3 to evaluate the alterations of 5-HT and SCFAs in IBS.

Results: Five studies on SCFAs and 5 on 5-HT in IBS patients were included. As compared to healthy controls (HCs), the SMDs of 5-HT in IBS patients was 2.35 (95% CI 0.46-4.24) and the SMDs of total SCFAs, acetic acid, propionic acid, and butyric acid in IBS patients were - 0.01 (95% CI - 0.57-0.55), - 0.04 (95% CI - 0.55-0.47), 0.07 (95% CI - 0.45-0.60), and - 0.00 (95% CI - 0.49-0.49), respectively.

Conclusions: There was an increase in 5-HT in blood of IBS patients, indicating the increased 5-HT in blood may be involved in IBS pathogenesis. However, there were no significant differences in SCFAs in feces between IBS patients and HCs. But the study did not differentiate between subgroups of IBS. These findings might provide insight for future studies of the BGM axis in the pathogenesis of IBS. Mei Luo and Xiaojun Zhuang contributed equally to the writing of this article.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12876-020-01577-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7788881PMC
January 2021

Alterations in Bile Acid Metabolism Associated With Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

Inflamm Bowel Dis 2021 Jan 5. Epub 2021 Jan 5.

Department of Gastroenterology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China.

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic relapsing inflammatory disorder closely related to gut dysbiosis, which is associated with alterations in an important bacterial metabolite, bile acids (BAs). Although certain findings pertinent to BA changes in IBD vary among studies owing to the differences in sample type, quantitated BA species, study methodology, and patient characteristics, a specific trend concerning variations of BAs in IBD has been identified. In elaborating on this observation, it was noted that primary BAs and conjugated BAs are augmented in fecal samples but there is a reduction in secondary BAs in fecal samples. It is not entirely clear why patients with IBD manifest these changes and what role these changes play in the onset and development of IBD. Previous studies have shown that IBD-associated BA changes may be caused by alterations in BA absorption, synthesis, and bacterial modification. The complex relationship between bacteria and BAs may provide additional and deeper insight into host-gut microbiota interactions in the pathogenesis of IBD. The characteristic BA changes may generate profound effects in patients with IBD by shaping the gut microbiota community, affecting inflammatory processes, causing BA malabsorption associated with diarrhea, and even leading to intestinal dysplasia and cancer. Thus, therapeutic strategies correcting the alterations in the composition of BAs, including the elimination of excess BAs and the supplementation of deficient BAs, may prove promising in IBD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ibd/izaa342DOI Listing
January 2021

DNA Damage-Regulated Autophagy Modulator 1 (DRAM1) Mediates Autophagy and Apoptosis of Intestinal Epithelial Cells in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

Dig Dis Sci 2020 Nov 13. Epub 2020 Nov 13.

Department of Gastroenterology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, 58 Zhongshan II Road, Guangzhou, 510080, People's Republic of China.

Background And Aims: DNA damage-regulated autophagy modulator 1 (DRAM1) is required for induction of autophagy and apoptosis. However, the influence of DRAM1 on the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has not been explored.

Methods: DRAM1 expression was examined in the intestinal mucosa of patients with IBD and colons of colitis mice. We used a recombinant adeno-associated virus carrying small hairpain DRAM1 to knock down the DRAM1 gene to treat colitis in the mice. The effect of DRAM1 on autophagy and apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells was explored. DRAM1-mediated interaction with the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway was also examined.

Results: DRAM1 expression in the intestinal mucosa of the IBD patients was higher than that in the control participates. DRAM1 expression in the inflammatory cells in patients with Crohn's disease (CD) was lower than that in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC). Additionally, DRAM1 expression was correlated with the Simple Endoscopic Score for CD and the Mayo endoscopic score for UC. Serum levels of DRAM1 in the IBD group were substantially higher than those in the normal group. The knockdown of DRAM1 could alleviate colitis symptoms in mice. In in vitro experiments, knocking down DRAM1 could reduce autophagy and apoptosis levels. Mechanistically, DRAM1 may participate in the regulation of these two processes by positively regulating JNK activation.

Conclusions: During intestinal inflammation, the upregulation of DRAM1 may promote the activation of JNK and further aggravate intestinal epithelium damage.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10620-020-06697-2DOI Listing
November 2020

Fecal Microbiota Alterations Associated With Clinical and Endoscopic Response to Infliximab Therapy in Crohn's Disease.

Inflamm Bowel Dis 2020 10;26(11):1636-1647

Department of Gastroenterology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China.

Background: Gut microbiota dysbiosis is associated with the occurrence and development of Crohn disease (CD). Currently, infliximab (IFX) is used more and more to treat CD; however, gut microbiota alterations during IFX therapy are variable and sometimes even contradictory. We longitudinally identified microbial changes during IFX therapy associated with the clinical and endoscopic response to IFX treatment in CD.

Methods: Fecal-associated microbiota was analyzed using 16S sequencing in 49 patients with active CD who were prospectively recruited at baseline, week 6, and week 30, respectively. Moreover, a model trained on the gut microbiota alterations at week 6 was developed to investigate their potential to predict clinical and endoscopic responses to IFX therapy at weeks 14 and 30.

Results: Characteristics of fecal microbiota composition in patients with CD after IFX treatment displayed an increased diversity and richness, a significant gain in short-chain fatty acid -producing bacteria, and a loss of pathogenic bacteria. Furthermore, certain functional profiles of Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways were predictably altered during the treatment period. Increased proportions of Lachnospiraceae and Blautia were associated with IFX efficacy; the combined increase of these taxa at week 6 showed 83.4% and 84.2% accuracy in predicting clinical response at weeks 14 and 30, respectively, with a predictive value of 89.1% in predicting endoscopic response at week 30.

Conclusions: We found that IFX diminished CD-related gut microbial dysbiosis by modifying microbiota composition and function. Specifically, increased Lachnospiraceae and Blautia at week 6 are associated with the clinical and endoscopic response to IFX, providing potentially predictive biomarkers for IFX treatment decision-making.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ibd/izaa253DOI Listing
October 2020

Short-course Rifaximin therapy efficacy and lactulose hydrogen breath test in Chinese patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome.

BMC Gastroenterol 2020 Jun 12;20(1):187. Epub 2020 Jun 12.

Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, 510080, China.

Background: Gut microbiota alterations including small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) might play a role in pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Rifaximin could effectively and safely improve IBS symptoms. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of rifaximin on Gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms, quality of life (QOL) and SIBO eradication in Chinese IBS-D patients.

Methods: This study included 78 IBS-D patients defined by the Rome IV criteria. Patients received 400 mg rifaximin twice daily for 2 weeks and 10-week follow-up. GI symptoms were assessed at week 0, 2, 4, 8 and 12. QOL and lactulose hydrogen breath test (LHBT) results were estimated at week 0 and 4.

Results: All participants showed significant improvements in GI symptom subdomains after rifaximin treatment (all P < 0.05), which could maintain at least 10 weeks of follow-up. Additionally, QOL scores were increased with concomitant improvement of clinical symptoms (all P < 0.05). The 45 rifaximin-responsive patients (57.7%) achieved significantly greater GI-symptom improvement than non-responders (all P < 0.05). No GI symptoms were associated with SIBO (all P > 0.05). SIBO normalization after rifaximin treatment measured by LHBT was found in 44.4% (20/45) of patients with SIBO before treatment.

Conclusion: A short course (2 weeks) of rifaximin improved GI symptoms and QOL in Chinese IBS-D patients whether they had SIBO or not. However, the efficacy of rifaximin could not be explained by the successful eradication of SIBO. Further studies on the therapeutic mechanisms of rifaximin in IBS are urgently needed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12876-020-01336-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7291629PMC
June 2020

The propionic acid and butyric acid in serum but not in feces are increased in patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome.

BMC Gastroenterol 2020 Mar 16;20(1):73. Epub 2020 Mar 16.

Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510080, China.

Background: Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) alteration have been reported in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), but the results are conflicting. Our study aims to explore the alteration of SCFAs in patients with diarrhea-predominant IBS (IBS-D) and their potential role in the occurrence and development of IBS.

Methods: We recruited patients with IBS-D defined by Rome IV criteria and age-and-gender matched healthy controls (HCs). A headspace solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometric (HS-SPME-GC-MS) method was developed for the analysis of acetic, propionic and butyric acid in feces and serum.

Results: Compared with HCs, the levels of the serum propionate (2.957 ± 0.157 vs 2.843 ± 0.098 mmol/L, P = 0.012) and butyrate (2.798 ± 0.126 vs 2.697 ± 0.077 mmol/L, P = 0.012) were significantly higher in IBS-D group. No significant differences were found among two groups with regard to the concentration of fecal acetate (4.953 ± 1.065 vs 4.774 ± 1.465 mg/g, P = 0.679), propionate (6.342 ± 1.005 vs 6.282 ± 1.077 mg/g, P = 0.868) and butyrate (2.984 ± 0.512 vs 3.071 ± 0.447 mg/g, P = 0.607).

Conclusions: Metabolites of gut microbiota, the propionic and butyric acid, are increased in patients with IBS-D in serum but not in feces. It suggests that propionic and butyric acid might be associated with the occurrence and development of IBS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12876-020-01212-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7077160PMC
March 2020

Fecal Microbiota Alterations Associated With Diarrhea-Predominant Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

Front Microbiol 2018 25;9:1600. Epub 2018 Jul 25.

Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China.

Altered gut microbiota are assumed to be involved in the pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). However, gut microbiota alterations reported in different studies are divergent and sometimes even contradictory. To better elucidate the relationship between altered gut microbiota and IBS, we characterized fecal microbiota of diarrhea-predominant IBS (IBS-D) patients and further explored the effect of rifaximin on gut microbiota using bacterial 16S rRNA gene-targeted pyrosequencing. In our study, IBS-D patients defined by Rome III criteria and age-and-gender matched healthy controls (HC) were enrolled to investigate the fecal microbiota alterations. These IBS-D patients were then treated with rifaximin for 2 weeks and followed up for 10 weeks. Fecal microbiota alterations, small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms of IBS-D patients were analyzed before and after treatment. Our results showed fecal microbiota richness but not diversity was decreased in IBS-D patients as compared to HC and there were alterations of fecal microbiota at different taxonomy levels. The abundant phyla was significantly decreased and was increased in IBS-D patients. Moreover, the alterations of predominant fermenting bacteria such as and might be involved in the pathophysiology of IBS-D. In addition, rifaximin was effective in terms of SIBO eradication and even GI symptoms of IBS-D patients achieved at least 10-week improvement after treatment. Furthermore, rifaximin induced alterations of some special bacteria rather than affected the overall composition of microbiota in IBS-D patients. Meanwhile, a potential decrease in propanoate and butanoate metabolism was found in these IBS-D patients after rifaximin treatment. Taken together, there were alterations of gut microbiota in IBS-D patients as compared to HC. Rifaximin could relieve GI symptoms, modify gut microbiota in IBS-D patients and eradicate SIBO in those patients with SIBO, suggesting an additional therapeutic mechanism of rifaximin in the treatment of IBS-D. Our findings of compositional gut microbiota alterations in IBS-D and the effect of rifaximin on the gut microbiota implied that altered gut microbiota were associated with the pathogenesis of IBS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2018.01600DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6068233PMC
July 2018
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