Publications by authors named "Zhenia Fuentes"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Applicability of the shorter 'Bangladesh regimen' in high multidrug-resistant tuberculosis settings.

Int J Infect Dis 2017 Mar 2;56:190-193. Epub 2016 Nov 2.

Maugeri Institute, IRCCS, Care and Research Institute, Via Roncaccio 16, 21049, Tradate, Italy. Electronic address:

In spite of the recent introduction of two new drugs (delamanid and bedaquiline) and a few repurposed compounds to treat multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR- and XDR-TB), clinicians are facing increasing problems in designing effective regimens in severe cases. Recently a 9 to 12-month regimen (known as the 'Bangladesh regimen') proved to be effective in treating MDR-TB cases. It included an initial phase of 4 to 6 months of kanamycin, moxifloxacin, prothionamide, clofazimine, pyrazinamide, high-dose isoniazid, and ethambutol, followed by 5 months of moxifloxacin, clofazimine, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol. However, recent evidence from Europe and Latin America identified prevalences of resistance to the first-line drugs in this regimen (ethambutol and pyrazinamide) exceeding 60%, and of prothionamide exceeding 50%. Furthermore, the proportions of resistance to the two most important pillars of the regimen - quinolones and kanamycin - were higher than 40%. Overall, only 14 out of 348 adult patients (4.0%) were susceptible to all of the drugs composing the regimen, and were therefore potentially suitable for the 'shorter regimen'. A shorter, cheaper, and well-tolerated MDR-TB regimen is likely to impact the number of patients treated and improve adherence if prescribed to the right patients through the systematic use of rapid MTBDRsl testing.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijid.2016.10.021DOI Listing
March 2017

Is there a rationale for pulmonary rehabilitation following successful chemotherapy for tuberculosis?

J Bras Pneumol 2016 Sep-Oct;42(5):374-385

. WHO Collaborating Centre for TB and Lung Diseases, Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico - IRCCS - Tradate, Italia.

The role of tuberculosis as a public health care priority and the availability of diagnostic tools to evaluate functional status (spirometry, plethysmography, and DLCO determination), arterial blood gases, capacity to perform exercise, lesions (chest X-ray and CT), and quality of life justify the effort to consider what needs to be done when patients have completed their treatment. To our knowledge, no review has ever evaluated this topic in a comprehensive manner. Our objective was to review the available evidence on this topic and draw conclusions regarding the future role of the "post-tuberculosis treatment" phase, which will potentially affect several million cases every year. We carried out a non-systematic literature review based on a PubMed search using specific keywords (various combinations of the terms "tuberculosis", "rehabilitation", "multidrug-resistant tuberculosis", "pulmonary disease", "obstructive lung disease", and "lung volume measurements"). The reference lists of the most important studies were retrieved in order to improve the sensitivity of the search. Manuscripts written in English, Spanish, and Russian were selected. The main areas of interest were tuberculosis sequelae following tuberculosis diagnosis and treatment; "destroyed lung"; functional evaluation of sequelae; pulmonary rehabilitation interventions (physiotherapy, long-term oxygen therapy, and ventilation); and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.The evidence found suggests that tuberculosis is definitively responsible for functional sequelae, primarily causing an obstructive pattern on spirometry (but also restrictive and mixed patterns), and that there is a rationale for pulmonary rehabilitation. We also provide a list of variables that should be discussed in future studies on pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with post-tuberculosis sequelae. RESUMO O papel da tuberculose como uma prioridade de saúde pública e a disponibilidade de ferramentas diagnósticas para avaliar o estado funcional (espirometria, pletismografia e DLCO), a gasometria arterial, a capacidade de realizar exercícios, as lesões (radiografia de tórax e TC) e a qualidade de vida justificam o esforço de se considerar o que deve ser feito quando os pacientes completam seu tratamento. Até onde sabemos, nenhuma revisão avaliou esse tópico de forma abrangente. Nosso objetivo foi revisar as evidências disponíveis e obter algumas conclusões sobre o futuro papel da fase de "tratamento pós-tuberculose", que irá potencialmente impactar milhões de casos todos os anos. Realizou-se uma revisão não sistemática da literatura tendo como base uma pesquisa no PubMed usando palavras-chave específicas (várias combinações dos termos "tuberculose", "reabilitação", "tuberculose multirresistente", "doença pulmonar", "doença pulmonar obstrutiva", e "medidas de volume pulmonar"). As listas de referências dos artigos principais foram recuperadas para melhorar a sensibilidade da busca. Foram selecionados manuscritos escritos em inglês, espanhol e russo. As principais áreas de interesse foram sequelas de tuberculose após diagnóstico e tratamento; "pulmão destruído"; avaliação funcional das sequelas; intervenções de reabilitação pulmonar (fisioterapia, oxigenoterapia de longo prazo e ventilação); e tuberculose multirresistente. As evidências encontradas sugerem que a tuberculose é definitivamente responsável por sequelas funcionais, principalmente causando um padrão obstrutivo na espirometria (mas também padrões restritivos e mistos) e que há razão para a reabilitação pulmonar. Fornecemos também uma lista de variáveis a serem discutidas em futuros estudos sobre reabilitação pulmonar em pacientes com sequelas pós-tuberculose.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S1806-37562016000000226DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5094875PMC
July 2017

Roadmap for tuberculosis elimination in Latin American and Caribbean countries: a strategic alliance.

Eur Respir J 2016 11;48(5):1282-1287

World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases, Fondazione S. Maugeri, Care and Research Institute, Tradate, Italy

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1183/13993003.01549-2016DOI Listing
November 2016

Pulmonary histoplasmosis: unusual histopathologic findings.

Pathol Res Pract 2006 20;202(5):373-8. Epub 2006 Feb 20.

Complejo Hospitalario José Ignacio Baldó, and Sección de Micología Médica, Instituto de Medicina Tropical, Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas, Venezuela.

Four patients with clinical diagnosis of interstitial lung disease (ILD) are presented. In these patients, lung biopsies revealed bronchocentric granulomatosis (BG), pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP), diffuse alveolar damage (DAD), and in one biopsy, the clinical manifestations suggested tuberculous primo-infection with systemic dissemination. Three patients died without diagnosis. In all four cases, specific histological stains found Histoplasma capsulatum. Histoplasmosis may mimic other infectious or non-infectious pulmonary diseases, such as interstitial and granulomatous pulmonary disease. Therefore, the absolute need for identification of the organism by culture or special stains cannot be over-emphasized and may lead to a proper mycological diagnosis. This highlights the importance of differential diagnosis with systemic infectious diseases, especially in areas where deep-seated mycosis are endemic.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prp.2005.10.012DOI Listing
July 2006
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