Publications by authors named "Zhengquan Tang"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The outer membrane protein Amuc_1100 of Akkermansia muciniphila alleviates the depression-like behavior of depressed mice induced by chronic stress.

Biochem Biophys Res Commun 2021 Aug 12;566:170-176. Epub 2021 Jun 12.

School of Life Sciences, Anhui University, Hefei, Anhui, 230601, China; Key Laboratory of Human Microenvironment and Precision Medicine of Anhui Higher Education Institutes, Anhui University, Hefei, Anhui, 230601, China. Electronic address:

Akkermansia muciniphila is a symbiotic intestinal bacterium with a high medicinal value. Amuc_1100 is the outer membrane protein of A. muciniphila and plays an important role in the interaction between A. muciniphila and its host. The objective of this study was to evaluate the antidepressant activity of Amuc_1100 in a chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) model. Amuc_1100 intervention ameliorated CUMS-induced depression-like behavior and CUMS-induced down-regulation of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, or simply, 5-HT) in the serum and colon of mice. Microbial analysis of mouse feces showed that Amuc_1100 could improve the gut microbiota dysregulation induced by CUMS. In addition, Amuc_1100 intervention could also improve the down-regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and inflammation in the hippocampus induced by CUMS. These results suggest that Amuc_1100 has a good antidepressant effect, and the mechanism may be related to the improvement of gut microbiota, the up-regulation of the BDNF level, and the inhibition of the neuroinflammatory response.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbrc.2021.06.018DOI Listing
August 2021

The outer membrane protein Amuc_1100 of promotes intestinal 5-HT biosynthesis and extracellular availability through TLR2 signalling.

Food Funct 2021 Apr;12(8):3597-3610

School of Life Sciences, Anhui University, Hefei 230601, Anhui, China. and Key Laboratory of Human Microenvironment and Precision Medicine of Anhui Higher Education Institutes, Anhui University, Hefei 230601, Anhui, China.

Akkermansia muciniphila is a probiotic inhabiting host intestinal mucus layers and displays evident easing or therapeutic effects on host enteritis and metabolic disorders such as obesity and diabetes. The outer membrane protein Amuc_1100 of A. muciniphila is likely to play a crucial role during the interaction with the host. 5-HT is a neurotransmitter and a key signal molecule regulating the gastrointestinal tract functions and other organs, which is involved in diverse physiological and pathological processes. This study demonstrated that Amuc_1100 could promote the expression of the 5-HT synthesis rate-limiting enzyme Tph1 in RIN-14B cells and reduce the expression of the serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT) in Caco-2 cells through direct interaction with TLR2, thereby improving 5-HT biosynthesis and extracellular availability. Using antibiotic-treated mice as animal models, we found that after gavage with A. muciniphila or Amuc_1100, Tph1 expression increased and SERT expression decreased in colon tissues. The 5-HT concentrations in colon tissues and blood were markedly elevated simultaneously. We also found that A. muciniphila or Amuc_1100 improved the gastrointestinal motility function and restored gut microbiota abundance and species diversity in antibiotic-treated mice. These results suggest that A. muciniphila can regulate the host intestinal 5-HT system via its outer membrane protein Amuc_1100 and TLR2. This mechanism represented an important approach through which A. muciniphila interacts with the host and further influences 5-HT-related physiological functions. These results advance the understanding of interplay mechanisms between the gut microbiota and the host, which could be the basis for new intervention strategies for related diseases.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/d1fo00115aDOI Listing
April 2021

Cross-talk between NMDA and GABA(A) receptors in cultured neurons of the rat inferior colliculus.

Sci China Life Sci 2011 Jun 26;54(6):560-6. Epub 2011 Jun 26.

Chinese Academy of Sciences Key Laboratory of Brain Function and Diseases, School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, China.

Neuronal ion channels of different types often do not function independently but will inhibit or potentiate the activity of other types of channels, a process called cross-talk. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA receptor) and the γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABA(A) receptor) are important excitatory and inhibitory receptors in the central nervous system, respectively. Currently, cross-talk between the NMDA receptor and the GABA(A) receptor, particularly in the central auditory system, is not well understood. In the present study, we investigated functional interactions between the NMDA receptor and the GABA(A) receptor using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques in cultured neurons from the inferior colliculus, which is an important nucleus in the central auditory system. We found that the currents induced by aspartate at 100 μmol L(-1) were suppressed by the pre-perfusion of GABA at 100 μmol L(-1), indicating cross-inhibition of NMDA receptors by activation of GABA(A) receptors. Moreover, we found that the currents induced by GABA at 100 μmol L(-1) (I (GABA)) were not suppressed by the pre-perfusion of 100 μmol L(-1) aspartate, but those induced by GABA at 3 μmol L(-1) were suppressed, indicating concentration-dependent cross-inhibition of GABA(A) receptors by activation of NMDA receptors. In addition, inhibition of IGABA by aspartate was not affected by blockade of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels with CdCl(2) in a solution that contained Ca(2+), however, CdCl(2) effectively attenuated the inhibition of I (GABA) by aspartate when it was perfused in a solution that contained Ba(2+) instead of Ca(2+) or a solution that contained Ca(2+) and 10 mmol L(-1) BAPTA, a membrane-permeable Ca(2+) chelator, suggesting that this inhibition is mediated by Ca(2+) influx through NMDA receptors, rather than voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels. Finally, KN-62, a potent inhibitor of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), reduced the inhibition of I (GABA) by aspartate, indicating the involvement of CaMKII in this cross-inhibition. Our study demonstrates a functional interaction between NMDA and GABA(A) receptors in the inferior colliculus of rats. The presence of cross-talk between these receptors suggests that the mechanisms underlying information processing in the central auditory system may be more complex than previously believed.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11427-011-4178-6DOI Listing
June 2011
-->