Publications by authors named "Zeynab Yassin"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Lung abscess as a complication of COVID-19 infection, a case report.

Clin Case Rep 2021 Mar 25;9(3):1130-1134. Epub 2021 Jan 25.

Department of Internal Medicine School of Medicine Hazrat- e Rasool General Hospital Iran University of Medical sciences(IUMS) Tehran Iran.

To our knowledge, no previous studies have reported lung abscess as a complication of COVID-19 infection. It is essential to follow-up with the patients after discharge for such complications, especially if they are symptomatic.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ccr3.3686DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7981683PMC
March 2021

Safety and efficacy of Favipiravir in moderate to severe SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia.

Int Immunopharmacol 2021 Mar 11;95:107522. Epub 2021 Mar 11.

Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Qom University of Medical sciences, Qom, Iran.

Background: We examined the safety and efficacy of a treatment protocol containing Favipiravir for the treatment of SARS-CoV-2.

Methods: We did a multicenter randomized open-labeled clinical trial on moderate to severe cases infections of SARS-CoV-2. Patients with typical ground glass appearance on chest computerized tomography scan (CT scan) and oxygen saturation (SpO) of less than 93% were enrolled. They were randomly allocated into Favipiravir (1.6 gr loading, 1.8 gr daily) and Lopinavir/Ritonavir (800/200 mg daily) treatment regimens in addition to standard care. In-hospital mortality, ICU admission, intubation, time to clinical recovery, changes in daily SpO after 5 min discontinuation of supplemental oxygen, and length of hospital stay were quantified and compared in the two groups.

Results: 380 patients were randomly allocated into Favipiravir (193) and Lopinavir/Ritonavir (187) groups in 13 centers. The number of deaths, intubations, and ICU admissions were not significantly different (26, 27, 31 and 21, 17, 25 respectively). Mean hospital stay was also not different (7.9 days [SD = 6] in the Favipiravir and 8.1 [SD = 6.5] days in Lopinavir/Ritonavir groups) (p = 0.61). Time to clinical recovery in the Favipiravir group was similar to Lopinavir/Ritonavir group (HR = 0.94, 95% CI 0.75 - 1.17) and likewise the changes in the daily SpO after discontinuation of supplemental oxygen (p = 0.46) CONCLUSION: Adding Favipiravir to the treatment protocol did not reduce the number of ICU admissions or intubations or In-hospital mortality compared to Lopinavir/Ritonavir regimen. It also did not shorten time to clinical recovery and length of hospital stay.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.intimp.2021.107522DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7951885PMC
March 2021

Effect of Arbidol (Umifenovir) on COVID-19: a randomized controlled trial.

BMC Infect Dis 2020 Dec 14;20(1):954. Epub 2020 Dec 14.

Department of Infectious Disease, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Background: Treatment of patients with COVID-19 has included supportive care to mainly relief symptoms of the disease. Although World Health Organization (WHO) has not recommended any effective treatments for COVID-19, there are some reports about use of antiviral drugs. The aim of this study is to determine the effect of Arbidol (ARB) on COVID-19 disease.

Methods: Using an open-label randomized controlled trial, we examined the efficacy of ARB in patients with COVID-19 in a teaching hospital. One hundred eligible patients with diagnosis of COVID-19 were recruited in the study and assigned randomly to two groups of either hydroxychloroquine followed by KALETRA (Lopinavir/ritonavir) or hydroxychloroquine followed by ARB. The primary outcome was hospitalization duration and clinical improvement 7 days after admission. The criteria of improvement were relief of cough, dyspnea, and fever. Time to relief from fever was also assessed across the two groups. Without any dropouts, 100 patients were entered into the study for the final analysis at significance level of 0.05.

Results: The mean age of patients was 56.6 (17.8) years and 56.2 (14.8) years in ARB and KALETRA groups, respectively. Majority of patients were male across two groups (66 and 54%). The duration of hospitalization in ARB group was significantly less than KALETRA arm (7.2 versus 9.6 days; P = 0.02). Time to relief fever was almost similar across two groups (2.7 versus 3.1 days in ARB and KALETRA arms, respectively). Peripheral oxygen saturation rate was significantly different after 7 days of admission across two groups (94% versus 92% in ARB and KALETRA groups respectively) (P = 0.02). Based on multiple linear regression analysis, IHD, Na level, and oxygen saturation at the time of admission and type of therapy were the independent adjusted variables that determined the duration of hospitalization in patients with COVID-19.

Conclusion: Our findings showed that Arbidol, compared to KALETRA, significantly contributes to clinical and laboratory improvements, including peripheral oxygen saturation, requiring ICU admissions, duration of hospitalization, chest CT involvements, WBC, and ESR. We suggest further studies on ARB against COVID-19 using larger sample size and multicenter design.

Trial Registration: IRCT20180725040596N2 on 18 April 2020.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12879-020-05698-wDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7734453PMC
December 2020

Evolution and resolution of brain involvement associated with SARS- CoV2 infection: A close Clinical - Paraclinical follow up study of a case.

Mult Scler Relat Disord 2020 Aug 21;43:102216. Epub 2020 May 21.

Department of neurology, School of Medicine, Hazrat Rasool-e Akram General Hospital, Iran University of Medical Sciences (IUMS), Tehran, Iran. Electronic address:

The new severe acute respiratory syndrome- coronavirus 2 is reported to affect the nervous system. Among the reports of the various neurological manifestations, there are a few documented specific processes to explain the neurological signs. We report a para-infectious encephalitis patient with clinical, laboratory, and imaging findings during evolution and convalescence phase of coronavirus infection. This comprehensive overview can illuminate the natural history of similar cases. As the two previously reported cases of encephalitis associated with this virus were not widely discussed regarding the treatment, we share our successful approach and add some recommendations about this new and scarce entity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.msard.2020.102216DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7240267PMC
August 2020

Cardiac Hydatid Cyst: A Case Report.

Iran J Public Health 2016 Nov;45(11):1507-1510

Dept. of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, Imam Khomeini Hospital Complex, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Hydatid disease commonly involves liver but in rare cases, it can involve cardiac structures. A 75-yr-old farmer from Parsabad-Moghan, northwestern Iran was presented to the Emergency Room of Tehran Imam Khomeini Hospital, Tehran, Iran with dyspnea and without chest pain in 2014. A lesion compatible with hydatid cyst was found in echocardiography and confirmed by serology and MRI. Surgical treatment was done but the patient was died in recovery room because of cardiac arrhythmia. In endemic areas, hydatid cyst should be considered in differential diagnosis of heterogeneous echogenic lesions even if the serologic tests are negative. Physician can use cardiac MRI to earn valuable information about the lesion and its relation to other structures. However, with all of these assessments, surgical removal of cardiac cysts may have some complications.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5182260PMC
November 2016

Prognostic value of on admission arterial PCO in hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

J Thorac Dis 2016 Oct;8(10):2765-2771

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Background: There is little data about the correlation between the outcome of community acquired pneumonia (CAP) and the hypercapnic type respiratory failure. In this study we prospectively investigated the prognostic significance of first arterial CO tension in patients hospitalized with CAP.

Methods: In this prospective study patients with CAP, admitted to a general hospital were included. PaCO was measured for each subject in an arterial blood sample drawn in the first 2 hours and its correlations with three major outcomes were evaluated: intensive care unit (ICU) admission, duration of admission and mortality in 30 days.

Results: A total of 114 patients (mean age: 60.9±18.3; male: 51.8%) diagnosed with CAP were included. Significant relationship was not found between PaCO and mortality (P=0.544) or ICU admission (P=0.863). However advanced age, associated CHF, high BUN levels, high CURB-65 scores, associated pleural effusion in chest X-ray and being admitted to the ICU (P=0.012, 0.004, 0.003, <0.001, 0.045 and <0.001 respectively) were all significant prognostic factors of higher mortality risks. Prognostic factors for ICU admission were a history of malignancy (P=0.004), higher CURB-65 (P<0.001) scores and concomitant pleural effusion (P=0.028) in chest X-ray. Hypercapnic patients hospitalized for longer duration compared with normocapnic subjects. Furthermore, patients with lower pH (P=0.041) and pleural effusions (P=0.002) were hospitalized longer than the others.

Conclusions: There was less prominent prognostic value regarding on-admission PaCO in comparison to other factors such as CURB-65. Considering the inconsistent results of surveys conducted on prognostic value of PaCO for CAP outcomes, further investigations are required to reach a consensus on this matter.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.21037/jtd.2016.10.21DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5107471PMC
October 2016