Publications by authors named "Zeleke Abebaw Mekonnen"

16 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Effect of Mobile Phone Text Message Reminders on the Completion and Timely Receipt of Routine Childhood Vaccinations: Superiority Randomized Controlled Trial in Northwest Ethiopia.

JMIR Mhealth Uhealth 2021 06 15;9(6):e27603. Epub 2021 Jun 15.

Department of Health Informatics, Institute of Public Health, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia.

Background: Nonattendance at vaccination appointments is a big challenge for health workers as it is difficult to track routine vaccination schedules. In Ethiopia, 3 out of 10 children have incomplete vaccination and the timely receipt of the recommended vaccines is low. Thus, innovative strategies are required to reach the last mile where mobile technology can be effectively utilized to achieve better compliance. Despite this promising technology, little is known about the role of text message-based mobile health interventions in improving the complete and timely receipt of routine childhood vaccinations in Ethiopia.

Objective: This trial aimed to determine the effect of mobile phone text message reminders on the completion and timely receipt of routine childhood vaccinations in northwest Ethiopia.

Methods: A two-arm, parallel, superiority randomized controlled trial was conducted in 9 health facilities in northwest Ethiopia. A sample size of 434 mother-infant pairs was considered in this trial. Randomization was applied in selected health facilities during enrollment with a 1:1 allocation ratio by using sealed and opaque envelopes. Participants assigned to the intervention group received mobile phone text message reminders one day before the scheduled vaccination visits. Owing to the nature of the intervention, blinding of participants was not possible. Primary outcomes of full and timely completion of vaccinations were measured objectively at 12 months. A two-sample test of proportion and log-binomial regression analyses were used to compare the outcomes between the study groups. A modified intention-to-treat analysis approach was applied and a one-tailed test was reported, considering the superiority design of the trial.

Results: A total of 426 participants were included for the analysis. We found that a higher proportion of infants in the intervention group received Penta-3 (204/213, 95.8% vs 185/213, 86.9%, respectively; P<.001), measles (195/213, 91.5% vs 169/213, 79.3%, respectively; P<.001), and full vaccination (176/213, 82.6% vs 151/213, 70.9%, respectively; P=.002; risk ratio 1.17, 95% lower CI 1.07) compared to infants in the usual care group. Similarly, a higher proportion of infants in the intervention group received Penta-3 (181/204, 88.7% vs 128/185, 69.2%, respectively; P<.001), measles (170/195, 87.1% vs 116/169, 68.6%, respectively; P<.001), and all scheduled vaccinations (135/213, 63.3% vs 85/213, 39.9%, respectively; P<.001; risk ratio 1.59, 95% lower CI 1.35) on time compared to infants in the usual care group. Of the automatically sent 852 mobile phone text messages, 764 (89.7%) were delivered successfully to the participants.

Conclusions: Mobile phone text message reminders significantly improved complete and timely receipt of all recommended vaccines. Besides, they had a significant effect in improving the timely receipt of specific vaccines. Thus, text message reminders can be used to supplement the routine immunization program in resource-limited settings. Considering different contexts, studies on the implementation challenges of mobile health interventions are recommended.

Trial Registration: Pan African Clinical Trial Registry PACTR201901533237287; https://pactr.samrc.ac.za/TrialDisplay.aspx?TrialID=5839.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2196/27603DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8277338PMC
June 2021

Acceptability, Barriers and Facilitators of Mobile Text Message Reminder System Implementation in Improving Child Vaccination: A Qualitative Study in Northwest Ethiopia.

J Multidiscip Healthc 2021 9;14:605-616. Epub 2021 Mar 9.

Department of Health Informatics, Institute of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia.

Background: Mobile phone text message-based mHealth interventions have shown promise in improving health service delivery. Despite the promising findings at a small scale and few contexts, implementing new technologies as part of changes to health care services is inherently challenging. Though there is a potential to introduce mHealth initiatives to health systems of developing countries, existing evidence on the barriers and facilitators of implementation in different contexts is not adequate. Therefore, this study aimed to explore the acceptability, barriers and facilitators of implementing mobile text message reminder system for child vaccination in Ethiopia.

Methods: This study applied a phenomenological study design. The study was conducted in north-west, Ethiopia between July 28 and August 19, 2020. A total of 23 participants were purposively selected for the in-depth and key informant interviews. We used an interview guide to collect data and audio-records of interviews were transcribed verbatim. Coding was done to identify patterns and thematic analysis was conducted using ATLAS ti7 software.

Results: The findings indicated that mothers were receptive to mobile text message reminders for their child's vaccination. Low mobile phone ownership, access to mobile network, access to electricity and illiteracy among the target population were identified as barriers that would affect implementation. Confidentiality and security-related issues are not barriers to implementation of text message reminders for child vaccination service. Facilitators for implementation include stakeholder collaboration, providing orientation/training to users, and willingness to pay by clients.

Conclusion: In this study, using mobile phone text message reminders for child vaccination services are acceptable by clients. Barriers identified were related to inadequate ICT infrastructure and other technical issues. Addressing the potential barriers and leveraging the existing opportunities could optimize the implementation in resource-limited settings. Before actual implementation, program implementers should also consider providing orientation to users on the proposed mHealth program.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/JMDH.S298167DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7955748PMC
March 2021

Mapping the role of digital health technologies in the case detection, management, and treatment outcomes of neglected tropical diseases: a scoping review.

Trop Med Health 2021 Feb 22;49(1):17. Epub 2021 Feb 22.

Health System Directorate, Ministry of Health, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Background: Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) are a diverse group of communicable diseases that principally impact the world's poorest people. The use of digital health technologies is an emerging and promising way to improve disease prevention, diagnosis, case detection, treatment delivery, and patient follow-up and facilitating health facility appointments thereby improving health outcomes. While the growing implementation of digital health technologies is evident, there is a lack of comprehensive evidence on the impact of digital health technologies in the control of NTDs. The main objective of this review was to map different pieces of evidence on the use of digital health technologies for case detection, management, and treatment outcome of the neglected tropical diseases.

Methods: We conducted a scoping review guided by the Joanna Briggs Institute guidelines. The studies were searched using electronic databases like MEDLINE (PubMed), Science Direct, Cochrane Library, and manual searching engines. Two authors extracted the data and compared the results. Discrepancies were resolved by discussion or the third reviewer made the decision. We produced the distribution of geographical locations, residents (setting), types of publications, and digital health technologies used on neglected tropical diseases using tables and graphs.

Findings: A total of 996 potentially relevant studies were generated from the initial search, and six studies were found to satisfy all the inclusion criteria and included in the final review. The review found that telehealth, eHealth, mHealth, telemedicine, and electronic health record were used digital health technologies to assess their impact on case detection, disease management, and treatment outcome of neglected tropical diseases. Mobile health was a feasible digital health technology for lymphatic filariasis patient identification and mHealth, eHealth, and electronic health records found to improve the service access, outcomes, and monitoring of visceral leishmaniasis at the community health system.

Conclusion: The scoping review identified that there were limited studies to see the impact of digital health technologies on case detection, management, and treatment outcomes for neglected tropical diseases. We also found that digital health technologies like ehealth, electronic medical linkage, telemed, and telehealth were practicable for patient identification, for treatment and diagnosis through contact with health professionals and teleconsultation, and support in improving health service delivery at the community-health system for managing the disease in both rural and urban settings.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41182-021-00307-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7898439PMC
February 2021

Mothers intention and preference to use mobile phone text message reminders for child vaccination in Northwest Ethiopia.

BMJ Health Care Inform 2021 Feb;28(1)

Department of Health Informatics, Institute of Public Health,College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia.

Objectives: With the unprecedented penetration of mobile devices in the developing world, mHealth applications are being leveraged for different health domains. Among the different factors that affect the use of mHealth interventions is the intention and preference of end-users to use the system. This study aimed to assess mother's intention and preference to use text message reminders for vaccination in Ethiopia.

Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 460 mothers selected through a systematic random sampling technique. Initially, descriptive statistics were computed. Binary logistic regression analysis was also used to assess factors associated with the outcome variable.

Results: In this study, of the 456 mothers included for analysis, 360 (78.9%) of mothers have intention to use text message reminders for vaccination. Of these, 270 (75%) wanted to receive the reminders a day before the vaccination due date. Mothers aged 35 years or more (AOR=0.35; 95% CI: 0.15 to 0.83), secondary education and above (AOR=4.43; 95% CI: 2.05 to 9.58), duration of mobile phone use (AOR=3.63; 95% CI: 1.66 to 7.94), perceived usefulness (AOR=6.37; 95% CI: 3.13 to 12.98) and perceived ease of use (AOR=3.85; 95% CI: 2.06 to 7.18) were predictors of intention to use text messages for vaccination.

Conclusion: In conclusion, majority of mothers have the intention to use text message reminders for child vaccination. Mother's age, education, duration of mobile phone use, perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use were associated with intention of mothers to use text messages for vaccination. Considering these predictors and user's preferences before developing and testing text message reminder systems is recommended.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjhci-2020-100193DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7898827PMC
February 2021

Effectiveness and Feasibility of Using Local Medical Universities for Capacity Building to Improve the Immunization Program in Ethiopia: Quasi-Experimental Study.

J Multidiscip Healthc 2021 6;14:9-19. Epub 2021 Jan 6.

Department of Health Informatics, Institute of Public Health, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia.

Introduction: Supportive supervision is one of the five essential components of the WHO's Reaching Every District (RED) strategy. However, it is generally not practiced based on the standard schedule because of capacity and low number of staff in the health system. Thus, this study aimed to test the feasibility and effectiveness of a capacity building and mentorship program in immunization by health science colleges to supplement the existing approach.

Methods: This study applied a pre-post quasi-experimental research design. The study included health workers of 30 health facilities (15 intervention and 15 control) followed for six months. A total of 90 health workers were included. To assess the effectiveness of the intervention package on immunization coverage and a change in RED strategy implementation over time, difference in difference (DID) analysis was used. Finally, a RE-AIM framework was used to evaluate the implementation process.

Results: The study indicated that the intervention package has a significant effect (P = 0.0001) on the overall implementation of RED outcomes. The DID analysis also indicated that health facilities in the intervention district have shown a higher Penta III coverage (17.4%) and complete vaccination coverage (16.6%) that are attributable to the intervention package. Similarly, knowledge and skills of health workers improved significantly (P < 0.05) after the intervention. The key informants also mentioned that the new approach was effective and acceptable.

Conclusion: The newly introduced capacity building and mentorship program by well-trained personnel of medical universities had positive effects on the immunization program. Thus, it is recommended to facilitate policy adoption and readiness for routine use at large scale.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/JMDH.S285280DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7797338PMC
January 2021

Acceptance of Human Papillomavirus Vaccination and Associated Factors Among Parents of Daughters in Gondar Town, Northwest Ethiopia.

Cancer Manag Res 2020 16;12:8519-8526. Epub 2020 Sep 16.

Department of Health System and Policy, Institute of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia.

Background: Cervical cancer is one of the profound threats to women's lives and the fourth most common cancer among women. Ethiopia launched the human papilloma vaccination for the first time, with the support of the Global Alliance for Vaccine and Immunization (GAVI) in 2018. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the acceptability of the human papillomavirus vaccine and associated factors among parents of daughters in Gondar town, Northwest Ethiopia.

Methods: A community-based cross-sectional study with a total sample of 946 study participants was conducted in Gondar town from April to May 2019. The study participants were selected using a multistage sampling technique from parents having a daughter of 9-17 years age. Data were collected using an interviewer-administered questionnaire. The data were entered into EpiData version 4.2 and exported to STATA version 14 for analysis. Variables having a p-value of <0.2 and <0.05 in the bivariable and multivariable logistic regression were considered as a statistically significant factor for the acceptance of HPV vaccination.

Results: A total of 899 study participants with a response rate of 95% were included in the study. Among participants in this study, 81.3% with 95% CI (78.6, 83.7) accepted to vaccinate their daughters for HPV vaccination. The acceptance to vaccinate daughters for HPV vaccination was affected by being from the richest household [AOR= 3.44, 95% CI = (1.97, 6.01)], good knowledge about cervical cancer [AOR=5.49, 95% CI= (2.62, 11.52)], and positive attitude towards HPV vaccination [AOR=21.53, 95% CI= (11.60, 39.96)].

Conclusion: The study revealed that the acceptance to human papillomavirus vaccination is high and was significantly associated with the level of knowledge about cervical cancer, the attitude towards HPV vaccination, and the wealth status of the households. Therefore, community education on cervical cancer and its prevention is crucial to increase awareness and acceptance as well.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CMAR.S275038DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7502398PMC
September 2020

Timely completion of vaccination and its determinants among children in northwest, Ethiopia: a multilevel analysis.

BMC Public Health 2020 Jun 11;20(1):908. Epub 2020 Jun 11.

Department of Health Informatics, Institute of Public Health, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia.

Background: Timely vaccination is key to prevent unnecessary childhood mortality from vaccine-preventable diseases. Despite the substantial efforts to improve vaccination completeness, the effort towards timeliness of vaccination is limited with non-attendance and delays to vaccination appointments remaining a big challenge in developing countries. There is also a limited evidence on timeliness of vaccination. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the magnitude and associated factors for timely completion of vaccination among children in Gondar city administration, north-west, Ethiopia.

Method: This study employed a community-based cross sectional study design. A sample size of 821 children aged 12 to 23 months were considered. Two stages random sampling technique was used to select study subjects. To account the effect of clustering, bivariable and multivariable multilevel logistic regression analysis were applied. The measures of association estimates were expressed as adjusted odds ratio (AOR) with their 95% confidence intervals (CIs).

Results: Of the 774 children included for analysis, 498 (64.3%) were fully vaccinated while 247 (31.9%) were fully vaccinated on-time. Caregivers who had secondary education and above (AOR = 2.391; 95% CI: 1.317-4.343), from richest households (AOR = 2.381; 95% CI: 1.502-3.773), children whose mother attended four or more ante natal care visits (AOR = 2.844; 95% CI: 1.310-6.174) and whose mother had two or more post natal care visits (AOR = 2.054; 95%CI:1.377-3.063) were positively associated with on-time full vaccination. In contrary, caregivers aged above 35 years (AOR = 0.469; 95 % CI: 0.253-0.869], being vaccinated at health post (AOR = 0.144; 95%CI: 0.048-0.428) and travelling more than 30 min to the vaccination site (AOR = 0.158; 95%CI: 0.033-0.739) were negatively associated with on-time full vaccination. The random effects indicated that 26% of the variability in on-time full vaccination was attributable to differences between communities.

Conclusion: In this study, untimely vaccination was found to be high. Different individual and contextual factors were found to be associated with on-time full vaccination. Therefore, tailored strategies have to be designed and implemented to address people and the communities where they live. Moreover, timeliness of vaccination should be considered as important indicator of the immunization program performance in Ethiopia.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12889-020-08935-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7291496PMC
June 2020

Health Professionals' Readiness and Its Associated Factors to Implement Electronic Medical Record System in Four Selected Primary Hospitals in Ethiopia.

Adv Med Educ Pract 2020 21;11:147-154. Epub 2020 Feb 21.

Department of Health Informatics, Institute of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia.

Background: Incorporating electronic medical record systems (EMRs) into the healthcare system is not only about modernizing the health system, but is about saving lives by facilitating communication and practicing evidence-based decision. Globally, more than 50% of EMR projects fail before they reach their target. Even though EMRs are an essential tool for health care, their adoption and utilization remains low in developing countries including Ethiopia.

Objective: The aim of this study was to determine health professionals' readiness and associated factors toward the implementation of EMRs in four selected primary hospitals in Ethiopia.

Methods: An institutionbased cross-sectional study supplemented with a qualitative approach was conducted on 414 health professionals from March 2 to May 5, 2018 in four selected primary hospitals in Ethiopia. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect the quantitative data and in-depth interviews were employed for the qualitative data. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 20 software. Descriptive statistics, bivariable, and multivariable logistic regression analyses were done. An adjusted odds ratio (AOR) with 95% CI was used to determine the association between the determinants and the outcome variable.

Results: More than half (258; 62.3%) of health professionals were ready to use the electronic medical recording system. EMR knowledge (AOR = 2.64; 95% CI: [1.62, 4.29]), attitude (AOR = 1.63; 95% CI: [1.01, 2.63]), computer literacy (AOR = 3.30; 95% CI: [2.05, 5.31]), and EMR training (AOR = 3.63, ;5% CI: [1.69, 5.80]) were significantly associated with EMR readiness.

Conclusion And Recommendation: In general, the overall readiness of health professionals for EMR implementation was found to be low. Comprehensive packages of capacity-building are crucial to raise the level of knowledge, attitude, and computer skill among health workers.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/AMEP.S233368DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7041609PMC
February 2020

Does phone messaging improves tuberculosis treatment success? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

BMC Infect Dis 2020 Jan 14;20(1):42. Epub 2020 Jan 14.

Department of Health Informatics, Institute of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia.

Background: Compliance to anti-TB treatment is crucial in achieving cure and avoiding the emergence of drug resistance. Electronic health (eHealth) interventions are included in the strategy to end the global Tuberculosis (TB) epidemic by 2035. Evidences showed that mobile messaging systems could improve patient adherence to clinic appointment for diagnosis and treatment. This review aimed to assess the effect of mobile-phone messaging on anti-TB treatment success.

Methods: All randomized controlled trial (RCT) and quasi-experimental studies done prior to August 26, 2019 were included in the review. Studies were retrieved from PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane and ScienceDirect databases including, grey and non-indexed literatures from Google and Google scholar. Quality of studies were independently assessed using Cochrane Risk of Bias Assessment Tool. A qualitative synthesis and quantitative pooled estimation were used to measure the effect of phone messaging on TB treatment success rate. PRISMA flow diagrams were used to summarize article selection process.

Results: A total of 1237 articles were identified, with 14 meeting the eligibility criteria for qualitative synthesis. Eight studies with a total of 5680 TB patients (2733 in intervention and 2947 in control groups) were included in meta-analysis. The pooled effect of mobile-phone messaging revealed a small increase in treatment success compared to standard of care (RR 1.04, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.06), with low heterogeneity (I = 7%, p < 0.0002). In the review, performance, detection and attrition biases were reported as major risk of biases.

Conclusions: Mobile-phone messaging showed a modest effect in improving anti-TB treatment success; however, the quality of evidence was low. Further controlled studies are needed to increase the evidence-base on the role of mHealth interventions to improve TB care.

Protocol Registration Number: CRD420170744339. http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO/display_record.php?ID=CRD42017074439.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12879-020-4765-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6961375PMC
January 2020

Effect of mobile phone text message reminders on improving completeness and timeliness of routine childhood vaccinations in North-West, Ethiopia: a study protocol for randomised controlled trial.

BMJ Open 2019 11 5;9(11):e031254. Epub 2019 Nov 5.

Institute of Biomedical Informatics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA.

Introduction: Non-attendance and delay in vaccination schedules remain a big challenge to healthcare workers. With the continuous growth of mobile network coverage and exponential penetration of mobile devices in the developing world, adoption of short message service has been shown to increase attendance for health services by targeting participant characteristics such as forgetfulness. Therefore, the aim of this trial is to determine the effect of mobile text message reminders on completeness and timeliness of childhood vaccination in North-West, Ethiopia.

Methods And Analysis: A two-arm, parallel, superiority, randomised controlled trial study will be employed. The study arms are the intervention group (text message reminders plus routine care) and the control group (routine care only). Mother-infant pairs will be randomised to one of the groups during enrolment. The trial will consider a sample size of 434 mother-infant pairs with 1:1 allocation ratio. Mothers assigned to the intervention group will receive text message reminder 1 day before the scheduled vaccination visit at 6 weeks, 10 weeks, 14 weeks and at 9 months. Initially, descriptive statistics will be computed. For the primary outcome log-binomial regression model will be used to identify associated factors, and relative risk with 95% CI will be reported. Primarily, iIntention-to-treat analysis principle will be applied. STATA V.14 software will be used for the analysis.

Ethics And Dissemination: This study obtained ethical approval from the University of Gondar Institutional Ethical Review Board. The trial findings on the effectiveness of mobile text message reminders in improving vaccination uptake will help to inform decision makers on the use of mobile health interventions in developing countries like Ethiopia. The scientific findings of the trial will also be published in reputable journals.

Trial Registration Number: PACTR201901533237287.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2019-031254DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6858152PMC
November 2019

Development of automated text-message reminder system to improve uptake of child vaccination in Ethiopia.

Online J Public Health Inform 2019 19;11(2):e15. Epub 2019 Sep 19.

Department of computer science, Faculty of Informatics, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia.

Introduction: Non-attendance and delay for vaccination schedules remains a big challenge to healthcare workers. Among the frequently mentioned reasons for missed vaccination in children is forgetfulness of caretakers to show up in vaccination schedules. This necessitates developing an automated reminder system with integration of mobile technologies.

Objectives: This paper aimed to develop and test an automated mobile text message reminder system in the local context of Ethiopia.

Methods: This system is developed using iterative development process through phases of requirement analysis, design, development, testing and refinement. Requirement gathering was done before development of the system. Front end application was developed using java technologies while back end applications were developed with oracle database. Finally, pilot testing of the automated reminder system was done on 30 participants.

Results: The automated system has been developed based on requirements. The text message reminder system has two components: 1. Web based application for client registration and automatic reminder scheduling; 2. SMS application for automatic SMS text messaging. In the pilot testing, all the text messages (100%) were dispatched from the automated system to the respective participants. Finally, the system has shown a notification that the text messages have been sent successfully.

Conclusion: Text message reminder system has been developed for routine childhood immunization program in Ethiopian context. Text message based mHealth interventions should be carefully designed, developed, tested and refined before actual implementation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5210/ojphi.v11i2.10244DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6788892PMC
September 2019

Willingness to Use Mobile based e-Partograph and Associated Factors among Care Providers in North Gondar Zone, Northwest Ethiopia.

Online J Public Health Inform 2019 19;11(2):e10. Epub 2019 Sep 19.

Department of Health Informatics, Institute of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Ethiopia.

Background: The proper use of Partograph supports to capture key maternal and fetal data. Paper-based Partograph are prone to error, incompleteness, delayed decisions and loss of clients' information. Electronic (e-Partograph) enables to easily retain and retrieve client data to ensure quality of care. Mobile technologies found an opportunity for resource-limited countries to improve access and quality of health care. Evidences were lacking on end users' acceptance to e-Partograph.

Objective: This study aimed to assess obstetric care providers' willingness to use mobile based e-Partograph and its associated factors.

Methods: Institutional based cross-sectional study was conducted from December 30, 2016 to January 21, 2017. A total 466 obstetric care providers were selected using multistage sampling technique in North Gondar Zone, Northwest Ethiopia. A structured self-administered questionnaire was used to collect the data. The data were entered in to Epi info version 7 and analyzed by using SPSS version 20. Cronbach's Alpha test was calculated to evaluate the reliability of data. A multivariable logistic regression analysis were used to identify factors associated with dependent variable. Adjusted odds ratio with 95%CI was used to determine the presence of association.

Results: The study found that 460(99.6%) of care providers owned mobile phone. Smartphone owners accounted only 102(22%). Of them, 205(46%) were willing to use mobile-phone for e-Partograph. Care providers aged >30 years (AOR=2.85, 95% C.I: 1.34-6.05), medical doctors and higher level clinicians (AOR=8.35, 95% C.I: 2.07-33.63), Health Center (AOR=4.41, 95% C.I:0.10-9.26), favorable attitude towards Partograph (AOR=2.76, 95% C.I: 1.49-5.09) and related in-service trainings (AOR=7.63, 95% C.I: 3.96-14.69) were enabling factors for willingness to use mobile phone.

Conclusions: Almost all obstetric care providers had access to mobile phone, however; smartphone ownership is still low. Willingness to use mobile-phone for e-Partograph was low. Younger aged, lower level clinicians, Hospital based workers, unfavorable attitude on Partograph and lack of in-service trainings were main factors for non-willingness. Hence awareness creation on partograph use and digital capacity building are crucial for effective e-partograph management.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5210/ojphi.v11i2.9468DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6788899PMC
September 2019

Effect of mobile text message reminders on routine childhood vaccination: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Syst Rev 2019 06 28;8(1):154. Epub 2019 Jun 28.

Department of Health Informatics, Institute of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia.

Background: The World Health Organization estimates that 29% of under-five mortality could be prevented with existing vaccines. However, non-consistent attendance for immunization appointments remains a global challenge to healthcare providers. Thus, innovative strategies are required to reach the last mile where technology could be effectively utilized to achieve better compliance with children immunization schedules. Therefore, the aim of the review was to systematically collect and summarize the available evidence on the effectiveness of text message reminders on childhood vaccination.

Methods: This review was conducted according to a priori published protocol on PROSPERO. A systematic literature search of databases (PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane/Wiley library, and Science direct) was conducted. Eligibility and risk of bias assessments were performed independently by two reviewers. PRISMA flow diagrams were used to summarize the study selection process. Taking into account the level of heterogeneity, a random effects model was used and risk ratios with their 95% CI were used to present the pooled estimates. To investigate the sources of heterogeneity, subgroup analysis and meta-regression analysis were also considered. In this review, publication bias was assessed statistically using Harbord test.

Results: A total of 1771 articles were searched. Out of those 1771 articles, 558 duplicated articles were removed. About 1213 articles were further screened, and finally, ten articles met the inclusion criteria. The meta-analysis showed that there is a significant effect of text message reminders on childhood vaccination coverage (RR = 1.11; 95% CI 1.05-1.17) with a moderate level of heterogeneity (I = 64.3%, P = 0.003). The results from the Harbord test suggested that there is no evidence for publication bias (P = 0.340).

Conclusion: This review highlights the potential benefits of incorporating mobile text message reminders into the standard management of childhood immunizations, especially in low- and middle-income countries. The frequency and timing of the text message reminders are also crucial in determining the effectiveness of text message reminders. Hence, mHealth interventions deserve more attention as a potential innovation to improve healthcare programs.

Systematic Review Registration: PROSPERO CRD42017074230.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13643-019-1054-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6598255PMC
June 2019

Epileptic patients' willingness to receive cell-phone based medication reminder in Northwest Ethiopia.

BMC Med Inform Decis Mak 2019 06 24;19(1):109. Epub 2019 Jun 24.

Department of Health Informatics, Institute of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia.

Background: Poor adherence compromises medication treatment effectiveness which results in suboptimal illness control. This can lead to increased use of healthcare services, reduction in patients' quality of life and increased healthcare costs. Reminding patients of their medication intake increases their adherence. Therefore, this study aimed to assess the willingness of epileptic patients to receive cell-phone based medication reminders and its associated factors in Northwest Ethiopia.

Methods: Institution based cross sectional study was conducted in the study period scheduled from March 1 to April 30, 2018 to interview 422 study participants at University of Gondar Comprehensive and Specialized Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia. Systematic random sampling was used to select 422 epileptic patients. A structured interviewer administered questionnaire was used to collect data and analyzed by using SPSS version 21. Binary and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the determinant factors for willingness to receive cell-phone based medication reminders. P < 0.05 at 95% confidence interval was considered statistically significant.

Results: A total of 394 (93% response rate) respondents were interviewed. The majority of respondents 262 (66.5%) owned a cellphone. Among the participants 271 (68.8%) were willing to receive reminder messages. In the multivariate regression analysis; living in urban areas (AOR = 5.63, 95% CI; 3.18-9.96), experience of forgetting things (AOR = 2.63, 95% CI; 1.44-4.80), forgetting to take Long-term Antiepileptic Drugs (AEDs) (AOR = 2.17, 95% CI; 1.06-4.43) and average monthly income ≥2000 birr (AOR = 2.43, 95% CI; 1.03-5.75) were significantly associated with willingness to receive cell-phone medication reminders. Pertaining to marital status; being married (AOR = 5.75, 95% CI; 1.11-29.70) or divorced (AOR = 5.15, 95% CI; 1.29-20.49) participants were also more willing to receive cell-phone medication reminders as compared to singles.

Conclusion: Most respondents have a cellphone and were willing to use it as a medication reminder. Marital status, place of residence, average monthly income, experience of forgetting things since they started AED, forget to take AED are the most notable factors that are associated with the willingness of patients to receive cell phone drug reminder messages.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12911-019-0830-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6589869PMC
June 2019

Undernutrition and its determinants among Ethiopian adolescent girls: a protocol for systematic review and meta-analysis.

BMJ Open 2019 05 22;9(5):e026718. Epub 2019 May 22.

Department of Nursing, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Debre Markos University, Debre Markos, Ethiopia.

Introduction: In Ethiopia, undernutrition is the common public health concern, swaying the lives of lots of adolescent girls. Its sequelae are not only limited to them, but rather their upcoming offspring are vulnerable too. Even though some studies have been carried out in different parts of the country, the national pooled prevalence and determinants of undernutrition are not known. Therefore, this study is aimed at determining the pooled prevalence and determinants of undernutrition among adolescent girls in Ethiopia.

Methods: Published articles will be retrieved from databases such as Medline and PubMed. Electronic search engines such as Google Scholar and Google will be used. To identify eligible studies, the Joanna Briggs Institute quality appraisal checklists prepared for different study designs will be used. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses checklist will be used to maintain the scientific robustness of the study. The presence of heterogeneity among studies will be examined by forest plot as well as I heterogeneity test. Potential causes of heterogeneity will be explored by carrying out sensitivity and subgroup analyses. The DerSimonian and Laird random-effects model will be used provided that heterogeneity is observed. Publication bias will be examined by observing funnel plots, and objectively by Egger's regression test. If the funnel plot is asymmetric and/or Egger's test was found to be statistically significant (p<0.05), the trim and fill (Duval and Tweedie's) analysis will be performed. The presence of a statistical association between independent and dependent variables will be declared if the p value is <0.05 with the 95% CI.

Ethics And Dissemination: Since this is a systematic review and meta-analysis, ethical clearance will not be a concern. The results of the study will be published in a peer-reviewed reputable journal and presented at different scientific research conferences.

Trial Registration Number: CRD42018106180.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2018-026718DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6538088PMC
May 2019

Assessment of Diarrhea and Its Associated Factors in Under-Five Children among Open Defecation and Open Defecation-Free Rural Settings of Dangla District, Northwest Ethiopia.

J Environ Public Health 2018 12;2018:4271915. Epub 2018 Sep 12.

Federal Ministry of Health, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Background: Open defecation (OD) is a widespread problem in the developing world. This practice facilitates the transmission of diarrheal diseases. In Ethiopia, still the national open defecation rate in 2014 was 34.1% (37.9% in rural and 8.7% in urban).

Objective: To assess diarrheal morbidity in under-five children and its associated factors in Dangla district, Northwest Ethiopia, 2016.

Methods: A community-based comparative cross-sectional study design with a multistage random sampling technique was applied. The total sample size was 550 (275 ODF and 275 OD). Descriptive and inferential statistics were done.

Results: A total of 525 participants were interviewed making the response rate 95.45%. The prevalence of diarrhea was 9.9% in ODF and 36.1% in OD kebeles. In ODF kebeles, child immunization (AOR = 0.037; 95% CI: 0.006-0.243), latrine presence (AOR = 0.036; 0.006-0.233), water shortage (AOR = 8.756; 95% CI: 1.130-67.831), and solid waste disposal (AOR = 0.143; 95% CI: 0.020-0.998) have statistically significant association with diarrhea occurrence. While in OD kebeles child immunization (AOR = 0.032; 95 CI: 0.008-0.123), water access of 7.5-15 liters/day (AOR = 0.029; 95% CI: 0.006-0.152), water shortage (AOR = 18.478; 95% CI: 4.692-72.760), and proper solid waste disposal (AOR = 0.023; 95% CI: 0.005-0.117) have significant association with diarrhea occurrence.

Conclusions: The overall prevalence of under-five diarrhea was low in ODF kebeles as compared with OD kebeles. The study showed that child immunization, latrine presence, water shortage in household, and solid waste disposal practices had statistically significant association with diarrhea occurrence in ODF kebeles, while water access at the individual level, water shortage in household, child immunization, and solid waste disposal have statistically significant association with diarrhea occurrence in OD kebeles. Integrated efforts are needed from the Ministry of Health together with line ministries and developmental partners in improving latrine utilization at household level, water shortage in households, and solid waste disposal practices.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2018/4271915DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6157118PMC
January 2019
-->