Publications by authors named "Zehra Mehdi"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Incorporating Simulation-Based Education Into Stroke Training.

Stroke 2021 01 20;52(1):e6-e9. Epub 2020 Nov 20.

Department of Stroke Medicine, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, United Kingdom (J.S.M., A.K.M.).

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/STROKEAHA.120.031056DOI Listing
January 2021

Perioperative management of adult patients with a history of stroke or transient ischaemic attack undergoing elective non-cardiac surgery.

Clin Med (Lond) 2016 Dec;16(6):535-540

Department of Ageing and Health, St Thomas' Hospital, London, UK.

It is increasingly common for physicians and anaesthetists to be asked for advice in the medical management of surgical patients who have an incidental history of stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA). Advising clinicians requires an understanding of the common predictors, outcomes and management of perioperative stroke. The most important predictor of perioperative stroke is a previous history of stroke, and outcomes associated with such an event are extremely poor. The perioperative management of this patient group needs careful consideration to minimise the thrombotic risk and a comprehensive, individualised approach is crucial. Although there is literature supporting the management of such patients undergoing cardiac surgery, evidence is lacking in the setting of non-cardiac surgical intervention. This article reviews the current evidence and provides a pragmatic interpretation to inform the perioperative management of patients with a history of stroke and/or TIA presenting for elective non-cardiac surgery.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7861/clinmedicine.16-6-535DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6297334PMC
December 2016

Interprofessional learning on a stroke unit.

Clin Teach 2015 Oct 5;12(5):315-9. Epub 2015 Jun 5.

Department of Ageing & Health, St Thomas' Hospital, London, UK.

Background: The importance of a collaborative approach to patient care in improving safety and outcomes has been highlighted by medical regulatory organisations. The World Health Organization has advocated that future health care professionals should be 'collaborative practice ready', and there is a global drive to incorporate interprofessional learning into health education. Interprofessional learning promotes the development of effective teamworking skills and improves the understanding of roles in the multidisciplinary team. This article outlines the development of a practice-based interprofessional learning initiative on a stroke unit. The World Health Organization has advocated that future health care professionals should be 'collaborative practice ready'

Methods: A half-day seminar was developed by King's College London in conjunction with an interprofessional clinical team from the Stroke Unit at St Thomas' Hospital. Students were assigned discipline-specific supervisors who allocated them to care for a patient within the confines of their usual professional role. They were asked to present the patient to a mixed-discipline group of students within the seminar from the perspective of their individual disciplines. This was followed by supervisor-led group discussions concerning the care of the patient and interprofessional working.

Results: Sixty-seven students from different disciplines participated in nine seminars over a 2-year period. Thematic analysis of participants' comments revealed an improvement in the students' awareness of: the varying roles and responsibilities of professionals; how differing disciplines share functions; and the importance of effective communication. All students stated that they would recommend the seminar to other students.

Discussion: Effective interprofessional learning programmes are imperative to promote collaborative practice amongst health care professionals. Stroke units are ideal learning environments for practice-based interprofessional education.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tct.12321DOI Listing
October 2015

Simulation training for geriatric medicine.

Clin Teach 2014 Aug;11(5):387-92

Department of Ageing & Health, St Thomas' Hospital, London, UK.

Background: Geriatric medicine encompasses a diverse nature of medical, social and ethical challenges, and requires a multidimensional, interdisciplinary approach. Recent reports have highlighted failings in the care of the elderly, and it is therefore vital that specialist trainees in geriatric medicine are afforded opportunities to develop their skills in managing this complex patient population. Simulation has been widely adopted as a teaching tool in medicine; however, its use in geriatric medicine to date has involved primarily role-play or discrete clinical skills training. This article outlines the development of a bespoke, multimodal, simulation course for specialist trainees in geriatric medicine.

Methods: A 1-day multimodal and interprofessional simulation course was created specifically for specialist trainees in geriatric medicine, using six curriculum-mapped scenarios in which the patient perspective was central to the teaching objectives. Various simulation techniques were used, including high-fidelity human patient manikins, patient actors, with integrated clinical skills using part-task trainers, and role-play exercises. Debriefs by trained faculty members were completed after each scenario.

Results: Twenty-six candidates attended four similar courses in 2012. Quantitative analysis of pre- and post-course questionnaires revealed an improvement of self-reported confidence in managing geriatric scenarios (Z = 4.1; p < 0.001), and thematic analysis of candidate feedback was supportive of simulation as a useful teaching tool, with reported benefits for both technical and non-technical skills.

Discussion: Simulation is an exciting and novel method of delivering teaching for specialist trainees in geriatric medicine. This teaching modality could be integrated into the training curriculum for geriatric medicine, to allow a wider application.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tct.12156DOI Listing
August 2014
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