Publications by authors named "Zai-Wei Ge"

14 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Three new species of from tropical Asia support an amphi-Pacific disjunct distribution in the genus.

Mycologia 2021 Sep-Oct;113(5):1009-1021. Epub 2021 Aug 2.

CAS Key Laboratory for Plant Diversity and Biogeography of East Asia, Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanhei Road 132, Kunming 650201, China.

is reported for the first time from tropical regions in China, thus expanding its known native geographic range from the Neotropics to tropical Asia. Phylogenetic evidence from four nuclear loci supports the monophyly of and a close evolutionary relationship with the nonmonophyletic genera and in the Agaricaceae. Detailed morphological descriptions are provided for three newly described species from China: , and . Illustrations of fresh basidiomata in the field, line drawings of key anatomical features, microscopic images of anatomical features, scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of basidiospores, and a key to known species of are also provided.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00275514.2021.1936832DOI Listing
August 2021

Squamanitaceae and three new species of Squamanita parasitic on Amanita basidiomes.

IMA Fungus 2021 Mar 3;12(1). Epub 2021 Mar 3.

Yunnan Key Laboratory for Fungal Diversity and Green Development, Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, 650201, Yunnan, China.

The systematic position of the enigmatically mycoparasitic genus Squamanita (Agaricales, Basidiomycota) together with Cystoderma, Phaeolepiota, Floccularia, and Leucopholiota is largely unknown. Recently they were recognized as Squamanitaceae, but previous studies used few DNA markers from a restricted sample of taxa from the family and lacked a formal taxonomic treatment. In this study, with newly generated sequences of the type of the genus Squamanita, S. schreieri, and several additional species of the family, the phylogeny is reinvestigated with a concatenated (18S-5.8S-nrLSU-RPB2-TEF1-α) dataset. This study reveals that Cystoderma, Phaeolepiota, Squamanita, Floccularia, and Leucopholiota are a monophyletic clade with strong statistical support in Bayesian analysis and form Squamanitaceae. Phaeolepiota nested within Cystoderma; Squamanita, Leucopholiota, and Floccularia clustered together as two monophyletic subclades; and Squamanita was present as a monophyletic clade with strong statistical support in both Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian analyses. The family name Squamanitaceae is formally emended and a detailed taxonomic treatment is presented to accommodate the five genera. Meanwhile, another concatenated (18S-ITS-nrLSU-RPB2-TEF1-α) dataset is used to investigate phylogenetic relationships and species delimitation in Squamanita. Our data indicates that "S. umbonata" from the Northern hemisphere forms two species complexes, one complex includes six specimens from North America, Europe, and East Asia, the other includes two specimens from Central America and North America respectively. Futhermore, species of Squamanita can parasitize species of Amanita, besides other fungal species. Squamanita mira parasitizes A. kitamagotake (A. sect. Caesareae), while S. orientalis and S. sororcula are parasites of species belonging to the A. sepiacea complex (A. sect. Validae). "Squamanita umbonata" from Italy occurs on A. excelsa (A. sect. Validae). Three new species of Squamanita from East Asia, viz. S. mira, S. orientalis and S. sororcula are documented with morphological, multi-gene phylogenetic, and ecological data, along with line drawings and photographs, and compared with similar species. A key for identification of the global Squamanita species is provided.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s43008-021-00057-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7927255PMC
March 2021

The genus (Clavariadelphaceae, Gomphales) in China.

MycoKeys 2020 29;70:89-121. Epub 2020 Jul 29.

School of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Yunnan Key Laboratory of Pharmacology for Natural Products, Kunming Medical University, Kunming, 650500, China Kunming Medical University Kunming China.

species (Clavariadelphaceae, Gomphales) in China were examined using morphology, molecular phylogenetic analyses of ITS data and chemical reactions. Eleven taxa were identified in China, including four species known previously to occur in China (, , and ), two new record species from China ( and ), four novel species (, , and ) and one species that could not be described due to the paucity of material. Finally, we also provided a taxonomic key for the identification of species in China.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/mycokeys.70.54149DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7406542PMC
July 2020

The genus (Catathelasmataceae, Basidiomycota) in China.

MycoKeys 2020 3;62:123-138. Epub 2020 Feb 3.

Systematic Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Uppsala University, Norbyvägen 18D, 75236 Uppsala, Sweden Uppsala University Uppsala Sweden.

Two new species, and , are described on the basis of morphological characters, phylogenetic evidence, host preferences and geographic distributions. A taxonomic key to the known species in China is also provided to facilitate identification. Based on samples from temperate Asia, Europe and North America, the phylogeny of was reconstructed using the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region, the large subunit (LSU) of the ribosomal DNA and the translation elongation factor 1-α (TEF1).The phylogenetic results showed that contains two monophyletic clades: the /subalpinum clade and the /imperiale clade. The Asian species and are closely related to the North American sp. (labelled as in GenBank) in the /subalpinum clade, whereas and are closely related in the /imperiale clade.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/mycokeys.62.36633DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7010842PMC
February 2020

A novel sequestrate species from Mexico: sp. nov. (Hysterangiaceae, Hysterangiales).

MycoKeys 2019 11;61:27-37. Epub 2019 Dec 11.

Instituto Tecnológico de Cd. Victoria, Av. Portes Gil 1301 Pte. C.P. 87010, Cd. Victoria Tam, Mexico.

Knowledge of sequestrate Hysterangiaceae fungi in Mexico is very limited. In the present study, a new member of the family, , is described. This speciesis closely related to , but differs from the latter in possessing a tomentose peridium 165-240 µm thick, with occasional large terminal hyphae up to 170 µm, a variable mesocutis (isodiametric to angular), and distinct bright yellowish subcutis. In contrast, possesses a fibrillose peridial surface with shorter hyphae, a peridium 200-450 µm thick, and a mainly hyaline isodiametric mesocutis with a slightly wider subcutis. The phylogenetic analysis of the LSU gene separated from with a Bayesian posterior probability (PP) = 1. This is the third species described for the American continent.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/mycokeys.61.36444DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6920220PMC
December 2019

A multi-gene phylogeny of (, ): new species, new combination and infrageneric classification.

MycoKeys 2018 20(32):65-90. Epub 2018 Mar 20.

Key Laboratory for Plant Diversity and Biogeography of East Asia, Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650201, China.

Taxonomic and phylogenetic studies of were carried out on the basis of morphological differences and molecular phylogenetic analyses. Based on the phylogeny inferred from the internal transcribed spacer (ITS), the partial large subunit nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrLSU), the second largest subunit of RNA polymerase II () and translation elongation factor 1-α () sequences, six well-supported clades and 17 phylogenetic species are recognised. Within this phylogenetic framework and considering the diagnostic morphological characters, two new species, and , are described. In addition, a new infrageneric classification of is proposed, in which the genus is divided into six sections. One new combination is also made. This study provides a robust basis for a more detailed investigation of diversity and biogeography of .
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/mycokeys.32.23831DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5904524PMC
March 2018

Ecological and physical barriers shape genetic structure of the Alpine porcini (Boletus reticuloceps).

Mycorrhiza 2017 Apr 1;27(3):261-272. Epub 2016 Dec 1.

Key Laboratory for Plant Diversity and Biogeography of East Asia, Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, 650201, Yunnan, China.

The Alpine porcini, Boletus reticuloceps, is an ectomycorrhizal mushroom distributed in subalpine areas of Southwest China, central China, and Taiwan Island. This distribution pattern makes it an ideal organism to infer how ectomycorrhizal fungi have reacted to historical tectonic and climatic changes, and to illustrate the mechanism for the disjunction of organisms between Southwest China and Taiwan. In this study, we explored the phylogeographic pattern of B. reticuloceps by microsatellite genotyping, DNA sequencing, ecological factor analysis, and species distribution modeling. Three genetic groups from the East Himalayas (EH), northern Hengduan Mountains (NHM), and southern Hengduan Mountains (SHM), were identified. The earlier divergent SHM group is found under Abies in moister environments, whereas the EH and NHM groups, which are physically separated by the Mekong-Salween Divide, are found mainly under Picea in drier environments. Samples from Taiwan showed a close relationship with the SHM group. High mountains did not form dispersal barriers among populations in each of the EH, NHM, and SHM groups, probably due to the relatively weak host specificity of B. reticuloceps. Our study indicated that ecological heterogeneity could have contributed to the divergence between the SHM and the NHM-EH groups, while physical barriers could have led to the divergence of the NHM and the EH groups. Dispersal into Taiwan via Central China during the Quaternary glaciations is likely to have shaped its disjunct distribution.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00572-016-0751-yDOI Listing
April 2017

Four new species in Leucoagaricus (Agaricaceae, Basidiomycota) from Asia.

Mycologia 2015 Sep-Oct;107(5):1033-44. Epub 2015 Aug 3.

111 Koshland Hall 3102, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720-3102.

The genus Leucoagaricus has been well studied in Europe. However, species diversity of Leucoagaricus in Asia remains poorly known, especially in the mountains of southwestern China, a hot spot for biodiversity. Based on morphological characters and molecular data, four new species are described, La. asiaticus, La. subcrystallifer, La. subpurpureolilacinus and La. truncatus. Detailed morphological descriptions, drawings of microstructures for novel taxa and comparisons with closely allied taxa are provided. Phylogenetic analyses inferred from internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and region 6-7 of the gene for the second largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (rpb2) sequences show that the novel taxa are nested within a well-supported clade jointly formed by members of Leucoagaricus section Rubrotincti and subgenus Sericeomyces.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3852/14-351DOI Listing
November 2015

Multigene molecular phylogeny and biogeographic diversification of the earth tongue fungi in the genera Cudonia and Spathularia (Rhytismatales, Ascomycota).

PLoS One 2014 1;9(8):e103457. Epub 2014 Aug 1.

Department of Plant Pathology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America.

The family Cudoniaceae (Rhytismatales, Ascomycota) was erected to accommodate the "earth tongue fungi" in the genera Cudonia and Spathularia. There have been no recent taxonomic studies of these genera, and the evolutionary relationships within and among these fungi are largely unknown. Here we explore the molecular phylogenetic relationships within Cudonia and Spathularia using maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference analyses based on 111 collections from across the Northern Hemisphere. Phylogenies based on the combined data from ITS, nrLSU, rpb2 and tef-1α sequences support the monophyly of three main clades, the /flavida, /velutipes, and /cudonia clades. The genus Cudonia and the family Cudoniaceae are supported as monophyletic groups, while the genus Spathularia is not monophyletic. Although Cudoniaceae is monophyletic, our analyses agree with previous studies that this family is nested within the Rhytismataceae. Our phylogenetic analyses circumscribes 32 species-level clades, including the putative recognition of 23 undescribed phylogenetic species. Our molecular phylogeny also revealed an unexpectedly high species diversity of Cudonia and Spathularia in eastern Asia, with 16 (out of 21) species-level clades of Cudonia and 8 (out of 11) species-level clades of Spathularia. We estimate that the divergence time of the Cudoniaceae was in the Paleogene approximately 28 Million years ago (Mya) and that the ancestral area for this group of fungi was in Eastern Asia based on the current data. We hypothesize that the large-scale geological and climatic events in Oligocene (e.g. the global cooling and the uplift of the Tibetan plateau) may have triggered evolutionary radiations in this group of fungi in East Asia. This work provides a foundation for future studies on the phylogeny, diversity, and evolution of Cudonia and Spathularia and highlights the need for more molecular studies on collections from Europe and North America.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0103457PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4118880PMC
April 2015

Finding needles in haystacks: linking scientific names, reference specimens and molecular data for Fungi.

Database (Oxford) 2014 30;2014. Epub 2014 Jun 30.

National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA, CBS-KNAW Fungal Biodiversity Centre, P.O. Box 85167, 3508 AD Utrecht, The Netherlands, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences - Microbiology, Università degli Studi di Perugia, Perugia, Italy, Molecular Mycology Research Laboratory, Centre for Infectious Diseases and Microbiology, Marie Bashir Institute for Infectious Diseases and Biosecurity, Sydney Medical School-Westmead Hospital, The University of Sydney, Westmead Millennium Institute, Westmead, Australia, Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Box 461, 405 30 Göteborg, Sweden, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37920, USA, Illinois Natural History Survey, University of Illinois, 1816 South Oak Street, Champaign, IL 61820, USA, Mycology Section, Jodrell Laboratory, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Richmond, Surrey, TW9 3DS, UK, Natural History Museum, University of Tartu, 46 Vanemuise, 51014 Tartu, Estonia, Purdue University, Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, 915 W. State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA, Institute of Excellence in Fungal Research, and School of Science, Mae Fah Luang University, Chiang Rai 57100, Thailand, Imperial College London, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew TW9 3DS, England, UK, Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle, Dépt. Systématique et Evolution CP39, UMR7205, 12 Rue Buffon, F-75005 Paris, France, Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650201, Yunnan, P. R. China, Departamento de Biología Vegetal II, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid 28040, Spain, Senckenberg Museum of Natural History Görlitz, PF 300 154, 02806 Görlitz, Germany, Department of Microbiology and Plant Pathology, Forestry Agricultural Biotechnology Institute (FABI), University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0001, South Africa, Real Jardín Botánico, RJB-CSIC,

DNA phylogenetic comparisons have shown that morphology-based species recognition often underestimates fungal diversity. Therefore, the need for accurate DNA sequence data, tied to both correct taxonomic names and clearly annotated specimen data, has never been greater. Furthermore, the growing number of molecular ecology and microbiome projects using high-throughput sequencing require fast and effective methods for en masse species assignments. In this article, we focus on selecting and re-annotating a set of marker reference sequences that represent each currently accepted order of Fungi. The particular focus is on sequences from the internal transcribed spacer region in the nuclear ribosomal cistron, derived from type specimens and/or ex-type cultures. Re-annotated and verified sequences were deposited in a curated public database at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), namely the RefSeq Targeted Loci (RTL) database, and will be visible during routine sequence similarity searches with NR_prefixed accession numbers. A set of standards and protocols is proposed to improve the data quality of new sequences, and we suggest how type and other reference sequences can be used to improve identification of Fungi. Database URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bioproject/PRJNA177353.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/database/bau061DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4075928PMC
February 2015

Two species of the Asian endemic genus Keteleeria form ectomycorrhizas with diverse fungal symbionts in southwestern China.

Mycorrhiza 2012 Jul 14;22(5):403-8. Epub 2011 Oct 14.

Key Laboratory of Biodiversity and Biogeography, Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, 650204, China.

The ectomycorrhizal status of Keteleeria species is reported for the first time based on morphological and molecular analyses of root tips from southwestern China. Based on internal transcribed spacer rDNA sequences, we detected 26 ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungal species on roots of Keteleeria evelyniana and Keteleeria davidiana collected from natural sites and a botanical garden in Kunming, China. These ECM symbionts represent six fungal lineages, including /russula-lactarius, /inocybe, /sebacina, /tomentella-thelephora, /wilcoxina, and /cenococcum. Our results provide the first evidence of ECM formation by Keteleeria and also supply ecologically important information for conservation and restoration efforts to recover populations of Keteleeria.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00572-011-0411-1DOI Listing
July 2012

Major clades of Agaricales: a multilocus phylogenetic overview.

Mycologia 2006 Nov-Dec;98(6):982-95

Biology Department, Clark University, Worcester, Massachusetts 01610, USA.

An overview of the phylogeny of the Agaricales is presented based on a multilocus analysis of a six-gene region supermatrix. Bayesian analyses of 5611 nucleotide characters of rpb1, rpb1-intron 2, rpb2 and 18S, 25S, and 5.8S ribosomal RNA genes recovered six major clades, which are recognized informally and labeled the Agaricoid, Tricholomatoid, Marasmioid, Pluteoid, Hygrophoroid and Plicaturopsidoid clades. Each clade is discussed in terms of key morphological and ecological traits. At least 11 origins of the ectomycorrhizal habit appear to have evolved in the Agaricales, with possibly as many as nine origins in the Agaricoid plus Tricholomatoid clade alone. A family-based phylogenetic classification is sketched for the Agaricales, in which 30 families, four unplaced tribes and two informally named clades are recognized.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3852/mycologia.98.6.982DOI Listing
October 2007

Contributions of rpb2 and tef1 to the phylogeny of mushrooms and allies (Basidiomycota, Fungi).

Mol Phylogenet Evol 2007 May 23;43(2):430-51. Epub 2006 Sep 23.

Biology Department, Clark University, 950 Main St., Worcester, MA 01610, USA.

A phylogeny of the fungal phylum Basidiomycota is presented based on a survey of 160 taxa and five nuclear genes. Two genes, rpb2, and tef1, are presented in detail. The rpb2 gene is more variable than tef1 and recovers well-supported clades at shallow and deep taxonomic levels. The tef1 gene recovers some deep and ordinal-level relationships but with greater branch support from nucleotides compared to amino acids. Intron placement is dynamic in tef1, often lineage-specific, and diagnostic for many clades. Introns are fewer in rpb2 and tend to be highly conserved by position. When both protein-coding loci are combined with sequences of nuclear ribosomal RNA genes, 18 inclusive clades of Basidiomycota are strongly supported by Bayesian posterior probabilities and 16 by parsimony bootstrapping. These numbers are greater than produced by single genes and combined ribosomal RNA gene regions. Combination of nrDNA with amino acid sequences, or exons with third codon positions removed, produces strong measures of support, particularly for deep internodes of Basidiomycota, which have been difficult to resolve with confidence using nrDNA data alone. This study produces strong boostrap support and significant posterior probabilities for the first time for the following monophyletic groups: (1) Ustilaginomycetes plus Hymenomycetes, (2) an inclusive cluster of hymenochaetoid, corticioid, polyporoid, Thelephorales, russuloid, athelioid, Boletales, and euagarics clades, (3) Thelephorales plus the polyporoid clade, (4) the polyporoid clade, and (5) the cantharelloid clade. Strong support is also recovered for the basal position of the Dacrymycetales in the Hymenomycetidae and paraphyly of the Exobasidiomycetidae.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2006.08.024DOI Listing
May 2007

New Asian species of the genus Anamika (euagarics, hebelomatoid clade) based on morphology and ribosomal DNA sequences.

Mycol Res 2005 Nov;109(Pt 11):1259-67

Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Heilongtan, China.

Two dark-spored agaric species from Asia are placed in the genus Anamika (Agaricales or euagarics clade). This result is supported by ITS and nLSU-rDNA sequences with strong measures of branch support, in addition to several morphological and ecological similarities. An inclusive ITS study was performed using a mixed model Bayesian analysis that suggests the derived status of Anamika within Hebeloma, thereby rendering Hebeloma a paraphyletic genus. However, the monophyly of Hebeloma cannot be rejected outright given ITS and nLSU-rDNA data. Thus, we propose two new Asian species in Anamika: A. angustilamellata sp. nov. from dipterocarp and fagaceous forests of southwestern China and northern Thailand; and A. lactariolens comb. nov., a Japanese species originally described in the genus Alnicola. A complete description of A. angustilamellata, including illustrations, is provided.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s0953756205003758DOI Listing
November 2005
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