Publications by authors named "Zahid Mahmood Sarwar"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Assessment of grain yield indices in response to drought stress in wheat ( L.).

Saudi J Biol Sci 2020 Jul 17;27(7):1818-1823. Epub 2019 Dec 17.

Research Center for Advanced Materials Science (RCAMS), King Khalid University, P.O. Box 9004, Abha 61413, Saudi Arabia.

Drought stress constricts crop production in the world. Increasing human population and predicted temperature increase owing to global warming will lead ruthless problems for agricultural production in near future. Hence, use of high yielding genotypes having drought tolerance and scrutinize of drought sensitive local cultivars for making them tolerant may be the proficient approaches to cope its detrimental outcomes. The current study was executed during 20015-2016 and 2016-2017 in field using randomized complete block design under factorial arrangements on 50 wheat genotypes for exploring their sensitivity and tolerance against drought. Some of the attributes of grain yield and drought tolerance indices were recorded. Grain yield showed negative correlations with tolerance index (TOL), drought index (DI) and stress susceptibility index (SSI) while positive correlation with mean productivity (MP) and geometric mean productivity (GMP) under drought condition. These findings depicted that tolerant genotypes could be chosen by high MP and GMP values and low SSI and TOL values. Based on the results, genotypes GA-02, Faisalabad-83, 9444, Sehar-06, Pirsabak-04 and Kohistan-97 were more tolerant and recognized as suitable for both normal and drought conditions. Genotypes of Chenab-00, Kohsar-95, Parwaz-94 and Kohenoor-83 confirmed more sensitive due to high grain yield loss under drought stress.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjbs.2019.12.009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7296489PMC
July 2020

First record and taxonomic description of the genus (Fabricius) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae: Plusiinae) from Pakistan.

Saudi J Biol Sci 2020 May 13;27(5):1375-1379. Epub 2019 Dec 13.

Research Center for Advanced Materials Science (RCAMS), King Khalid University, P.O. Box 9004, Abha 61413, Saudi Arabia.

Species belonging to genus, Fabricius of the subfamily Plusiinae which are polyphagous in nature and pest of vegetables, foods, legumes, fodder, fruits, ornamental plants and cotton crops. Samples were collected from different localities of district Bahawalpur. For collection, comprehensive and comparative surveys were carried out during 2017-18 on taxonomic account of species of the genus Fabricius and resulted identified one species (Fabricius) first time from Pakistan. Morphological characters viz., vertex, frons, labial palpi, antennae, compound eyes, ocelli, proboscis, wing venation, male and female genital characteristics were used for the identification and classification. Dichotomous keys and photographs are also provided. There is hardly any substantial research work on taxonomic studies of subfamily Plusiinae Pakistan. So to fill this gap the present proposal was designed to study the diversity of Noctuid moths from Pakistan and very fruitful results have been obtained.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjbs.2019.12.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7182779PMC
May 2020

Effects of temperature on baseline susceptibility and stability of insecticide resistance against (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae) in the absence of selection pressure.

Saudi J Biol Sci 2020 Jan 15;27(1):1-5. Epub 2019 Mar 15.

Research Center for Advanced Materials Science (RCAMS), King Khalid University, P.O. Box 9004, Abha 61413, Saudi Arabia.

L. (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae) is an important pest causing significant losses to vegetables worldwide. Insecticides resistance in is a serious issue for scientists since last 30 years. However, deltamethrin and are commonly used insecticides against but studies involving development of resistance in against these two insecticides at different temperatures are lacking. The current study was aimed to find out the toxicity of deltamethrin and , and resistance development in . Results showed that the positive correlation between the temperature and toxicities of deltamethrin and . The results indicated -0.051, -0.049, -0.047, and -0.046 folds of deltamethrin resistance at 15 °C, 20 °C, 25 °C, and 30 °C temperatures, respectively from 1 to 12 generations. The toxicity of after 24 h was 2.2 and 4.8 folds on 1 generation at 20 °C and 25 °C temperatures, respectively compared to the toxicity recorded at 15 °C (non-overlapping of 95% confidence limits). Based on the results of this study, it is concluded that the temperature has a positive correlation with the toxicity of deltamethrin and against the larvae of This study suggests that deltamethrin and can be included in the management program of on many vegetable crops The baseline susceptibility data might be helpful to understand the resistance mechanisms in .
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjbs.2019.03.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6933245PMC
January 2020

Fitness parameters of (L.) (Lepidoptera; Plutellidae) at four constant temperatures by using age-stage, two-sex life tables.

Saudi J Biol Sci 2019 Nov 27;26(7):1661-1667. Epub 2018 Aug 27.

Department of Botany, Hindu College Moradabad, 244001, India.

Different temperature zones have significant impact on the population dynamics of . Effective management of requires the knowledge of temperature tolerance by different life stages. In the current study, fitness parameters of diamondback moth were reported by using age-stage, two-sex life table traits at four constant temperatures (15, 20, 25 and 30 °C). The life cycle of was significantly longer at 15 °C. The 20 °C level of temperature was found optimal for fecundity, gross reproductive rate (51.74 offspring) and net reproductive rate (44.35 offspring per individual). The adult pre-oviposition period was statistically at par at all four level of temperatures. However, the survival was maximum at 20 °C as compared to other three temperature ranges. Based on the current study, it was concluded that temperature has a great role in population build-up of and effective management tactics should be applied to prevent significant damage to cabbage and other cruciferous crops when the temperature in the field is near 20 °C.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjbs.2018.08.026DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6864165PMC
November 2019

Pollination biology of (L.) Benth. (Fabaceae: Mimosoideae) with reference to insect floral visitors.

Saudi J Biol Sci 2019 Nov 4;26(7):1548-1552. Epub 2018 Dec 4.

Department of Statistics, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 60800, Pakistan.

Indian siris, (L.) Benth. (Fabaceae: Mimosoideae) has significant importance to human beings for its multipurpose use. Insects play a crucial role in the pollination biology of flowering plants. In the current study, we studied the pollination biology of with special reference to insect floral visitors. The effectiveness of floral visitors was investigated in term of visitation frequency, visitation rate and pollen load during 2012 and 2013. In the second experiment, effect of pollinators on yield of was studied in open and cage pollination experiments. Floral visitor fauna of included eight-bees, two wasps, two flies, and two butterflies species. Among them, , , and had maximum abundance ranging from 349-492, 339-428, 291-342 and 235-255 numbers of individuals, respectively during two flowering seasons. had the highest visitation frequency (6.44 ± 0.49-8.78 ± 0.48 visits/flower/5min) followed by (6.03 ± 0.43-7.99 ± 0.33 visits/flower/5min) and (3.61 ± 0.31-4.44 ± 0.18 visits/flower/5min). , and had the highest visitation rates (18.904 ± 1.53-11.43 ± 1.17 flower visited/min) and pollen load (15333 ± 336.22-19243 ± 648.45 pollen grains). The open pollinated flowers had significantly higher capsule weight (4.97 ± 0.21 g), seed weight (1.04 ± 0.05 g), seed numbers per pod (9.80 ± 0.34) and seed germination percentage (84.0 ± 1.78%) as compared to caged flowers. The results suggested bees especially , and could be effective pollinators of .
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjbs.2018.12.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6864188PMC
November 2019

Effects of selected synthetic insecticides on the total and differential populations of circulating haemocytes in adults of the red cotton stainer bug Dysdercus koenigii (Fabricius) (Hemiptera: Pyrrhocoridae).

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2018 Jun 9;25(17):17033-17037. Epub 2018 Apr 9.

Department of Entomology, University of Agriculture Faisalabad, Faisalabad, Pakistan.

Red cotton bug, Dysdercus koenigii (Hemiptera: Pyrrhocoridae), has become the major insect pest of various crops, including cotton, and thereby reducing the yield qualitatively and quantitatively and synthetic insecticides belonging to different groups are the major control agents for such insect pests. A laboratory experiment was carried out to evaluate the effect of different conventional insecticides, i.e., imidacloprid, deltamethrin, lambda cyhalothrin, gamma cyhalothrin and cyfluthirn on haemocytes of D. koenigii. The individuals were exposed to insecticides separately and data was recorded after 30 and 60 min of the exposure. The findings of current study depicted chlorpyrifos to be more effective and significant alterations in total haemocyte counts and differential haemocyte counts were observed in the cyfluthirn treated D. koenigii. In addition to this, cell structure was also disrupted as an immune response. Similar studies would also be helpful to understand the defence mechanisms of insects against the xenobiotics which will help to device efficient management tools for D. koenigii.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-018-1898-1DOI Listing
June 2018