Publications by authors named "Zack A Medress"

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Status epilepticus after intracranial neurosurgery: incidence and risk stratification by perioperative clinical features.

J Neurosurg 2021 May 14:1-13. Epub 2021 May 14.

Departments of1Neurosurgery and.

Objective: Status epilepticus (SE) is associated with significant mortality, cost, and risk of future seizures. In one of the first studies of SE after neurosurgery, the authors assess the incidence, risk factors, and outcome of postneurosurgical SE (PNSE).

Methods: Neurosurgical admissions from the MarketScan Claims and Encounters database (2007 through 2015) were assessed in a longitudinal cross-sectional sample of privately insured patients who underwent qualifying cranial procedures in the US and were older than 18 years of age. The incidence of early (in-hospital) and late (postdischarge readmission) SE and associated mortality was assessed. Procedural, pathological, demographic, and anatomical covariates parameterized multivariable logistic regression and Cox models. Multivariable logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards models were used to study the incidence of early and late PNSE. A risk-stratification simulation was performed, combining individual predictors into singular risk estimates.

Results: A total of 197,218 admissions (218,217 procedures) were identified. Early PNSE occurred during 637 (0.32%) of 197,218 admissions for cranial neurosurgical procedures. A total of 1045 (0.56%) cases of late PNSE were identified after 187,771 procedure admissions with nonhospice postdischarge follow-up. After correction for comorbidities, craniotomy for trauma, hematoma, or elevated intracranial pressure was associated with increased risk of early PNSE (adjusted OR [aOR] 1.538, 95% CI 1.183-1.999). Craniotomy for meningioma resection was associated with an increased risk of early PNSE compared with resection of metastases and parenchymal primary brain tumors (aOR 2.701, 95% CI 1.388-5.255). Craniotomies for infection or abscess (aHR 1.447, 95% CI 1.016-2.061) and CSF diversion (aHR 1.307, 95% CI 1.076-1.587) were associated with highest risk of late PNSE. Use of continuous electroencephalography in patients with early (p < 0.005) and late (p < 0.001) PNSE rose significantly over the study time period. The simulation regression model predicted that patients at high risk for early PNSE experienced a 1.10% event rate compared with those at low risk (0.07%). Similarly, patients predicted to be at highest risk for late PNSE were significantly more likely to eventually develop late PNSE than those at lowest risk (HR 54.16, 95% CI 24.99-104.80).

Conclusions: Occurrence of early and late PNSE was associated with discrete neurosurgical pathologies and increased mortality. These data provide a framework for prospective validation of clinical and perioperative risk factors and indicate patients for heightened diagnostic suspicion of PNSE.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3171/2020.10.JNS202895DOI Listing
May 2021