Publications by authors named "Yvonne J van der Helm"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Inflammation-Induced Osteogenesis in a Rabbit Tibia Model.

Tissue Eng Part C Methods 2017 11 21;23(11):673-685. Epub 2017 Aug 21.

1 Department of Orthopaedics, University Medical Center Utrecht , Utrecht, The Netherlands .

Pathologic conditions associated with bone formation can serve as models to identify bone-promoting mediators. The inflammatory response to bacterial infections generally leads to osteolysis and impaired bone healing, but paradoxically, it can also have pro-osteogenic effects. As a potential model to investigate pro-osteogenic stimuli, this study characterizes the bone formation in an established rabbit tibia model of periprosthetic infection. Our hypothesis was that the infection with Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) correlates with bone formation as a response to local inflammation. Fluorochromes showed excessive subperiosteal bone formation in infected tibiae, starting the first week and continuing throughout the study period. Despite the observed cortical lysis on micro-CT after 28 days, infection resulted in a twofold higher bone volume in the proximal tibiae compared to uninfected controls. The ipsilateral fibulae, nor the contralateral fibulae or tibiae were affected by infection. Next, we sought to confine the cause of stimulated bone formation to the isolated S. aureus cell wall. In absence of virulent bacterial infection, the S. aureus cell wall extract induced bone in a more favorable way without cortical lysis. This suggests that the sterile inflammatory reaction to bacterial antigens may be harnessed for bone regenerative purposes. Future investigations in this rabbit tibia model can lead to further identification of effective stimuli for clinical application.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/ten.TEC.2017.0151DOI Listing
November 2017

Bone morphogenetic protein-2 nonviral gene therapy in a goat iliac crest model for bone formation.

Tissue Eng Part A 2015 May 13;21(9-10):1672-9. Epub 2015 Apr 13.

1 Department of Orthopaedics, University Medical Center Utrecht , Utrecht, The Netherlands .

Treatment and reconstruction of large bone defects, delayed unions, and nonunions is challenging and has resulted in an ongoing search for novel tissue-engineered therapies. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) gene therapy is a promising strategy to provide sustained production of BMP-2 locally. Alginate polymer-based nonviral gene therapy with BMP-2 plasmid DNA (pBMP-2) in constructs with multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) has resulted in prolonged gene expression and bone formation in vivo. To further translate this technology toward larger animal models, important issues remain to be investigated, such as the necessity of seeded cells as a target for gene therapy. For that purpose, a large animal-screening model in an orthotopic location, with fully separated chambers, was investigated. Four cylinder-shaped implants were placed in the iliac crests of ten goats. Polycaprolactone tubes around each implant allowed bone ingrowth from the underlying bone and bone marrow and ensured separation of the experimental conditions. An empty tube showed low levels of spontaneous bone ingrowth, and implantation of autologous bone indicated proper bone function with respect to remodeling and resorption. Control ceramic scaffolds were compared to scaffolds containing pBMP-2 either or not combined with seeded MSCs. Fluorochrome incorporation evaluated at 3, 6, and 9 weeks and histomorphometry at 12 weeks after implantation revealed clear differences between the groups, with pBMP-2 combined with MSCs being the most effective. The BMP-2 was demonstrated in a variety of bone-residing cells through immunohistochemistry. Further analysis indicated that multinucleated giant cells might have an important role in transgene expression. Taken together, this work introduces a large animal model for studying bone formation at multiple sites simultaneously in an orthotopic location. The model appeared robust, showed no neighboring effects, and demonstrated effectivity of combined cell and gene therapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/ten.TEA.2014.0593DOI Listing
May 2015

Gene delivery of bone morphogenetic protein-2 plasmid DNA promotes bone formation in a large animal model.

J Tissue Eng Regen Med 2014 Oct 6;8(10):763-70. Epub 2012 Aug 6.

Department of Orthopaedics, University Medical Centre Utrecht, The Netherlands.

In the field of bone regeneration, BMP-2 is considered one of the most important growth factors because of its strong osteogenic activity, and is therefore extensively used in clinical practice. However, the short half-life of BMP-2 protein necessitates the use of supraphysiological doses, leading to severe side-effects. This study investigated the efficiency of bone formation at ectopic and orthotopic sites as a result of a low-cost, prolonged presence of BMP-2 in a large animal model. Constructs consisting of alginate hydrogel and BMP-2 cDNA, together acting as a non-viral gene-activated matrix, were combined with goat multipotent stromal cells (gMSCs) and implanted in spinal cassettes or, together with ceramic granules, intramuscularly in goats, both for 16 weeks. Bone formation occurred in all cell-seeded ectopic constructs, but the constructs containing both gMSCs and BMP-2 plasmid DNA showed higher collagen I and bone levels, indicating an osteogenic effect of the BMP-2 plasmid DNA. This was not seen in unseeded constructs, even though transfected, BMP-2-producing cells were detected in all constructs containing plasmid DNA. Orthotopic constructs showed mainly bone formation in the unseeded groups. Besides bone, calcified alginate was present in these groups, acting as a surface for new bone formation. In conclusion, transfection of seeded or resident cells from this DNA delivery system led to stable expression of BMP-2 during 16 weeks, and promoted osteogenic differentiation and subsequent bone formation in cell-seeded constructs at an ectopic location and in cell-free constructs at an orthotopic location in a large animal model.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/term.1571DOI Listing
October 2014

The osteoinductive potential of printable, cell-laden hydrogel-ceramic composites.

J Biomed Mater Res A 2012 Sep 27;100(9):2412-20. Epub 2012 Apr 27.

Department of Orthopaedics, University Medical Center Utrecht, 3508 GA Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Hydrogels used as injectables or in organ printing often lack the appropriate stimuli to direct osteogenic differentiation of embedded multipotent stromal cells (MSCs), resulting in limited bone formation in these matrices. Addition of calcium phosphate (CaP) particles to the printing mixture is hypothesized to overcome this drawback. In this study we have investigated the effect of CaP particles on the osteoinductive potential of cell-laden hydrogel-CaP composite matrices. To this end, apatitic nanoparticles have been included in Matrigel constructs where after the viability of embedded progenitor cells was assessed in vitro. In addition, the osteoinductive potential of cell-laden Matrigel containing apatitic nanoparticles was investigated in vivo and compared with composites containing osteoinductive biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) microparticles after subcutaneous implantation in immunodeficient mice. Histological and immunohistochemical analysis of the tissue response as well as in vivo bone formation revealed that apatitic nanoparticles were osteoinductive and induced osteoclast activation, but without bone formation. The BCP particles were more effective in inducing elaborate bone formation at the ectopic location.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jbm.a.34171DOI Listing
September 2012

Luciferase labeling for multipotent stromal cell tracking in spinal fusion versus ectopic bone tissue engineering in mice and rats.

Tissue Eng Part A 2010 Nov 13;16(11):3343-51. Epub 2010 Jul 13.

Department of Orthopaedics, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Tissue engineering of bone, by combining multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) with osteoconductive scaffolds, has not yet yielded any clinically useful applications so far. The fate and contribution of the seeded cells are not sufficiently clarified, especially at clinically relevant locations. Therefore, we investigated cell proliferation around the spine and at ectopic sites using noninvasive in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) in relation to new bone formation. Goat MSCs were lentivirally transduced to express luciferase. After showing both correlation between MSC viability and BLI signal as well as survival and osteogenic capacity of these cells ectopically in mice, they were seeded on ceramic scaffolds and implanted in immunodeficient rats at two levels in the spine for spinal fusion as well as subcutaneously. Nontransduced MSCs were used as a control group. All rats were monitored at day 1 and after that weekly until termination at week 7. In mice a BLI signal was observed during the whole observation period, indicating survival of the seeded MSCs, which was accompanied by osteogenic differentiation in vivo. However, these same MSCs showed a different response in the rat model, where the BLI signal was present until day 14, both in the spine and ectopically, indicating that MSCs were able to survive at least 2 weeks of implantation. Only when the signal was still present after the total implantation period ectopically, which only occurred in one rat, new bone was formed extensively and the implanted MSCs were responsible for this bone formation. Ectopically, neither a reduced proliferative group (irradiated) nor a group in which the cells were devitalized by liquid nitrogen and the produced extracellular matrix remained (matrix group) resulted in bone formation. This suggests that the release of soluble factors or the presence of an extracellular matrix is not enough to induce bone formation. For the spinal location, the question remains whether the implanted MSCs contribute to the bone regeneration or that the principal mechanism of MSC activity is through the release of soluble mediators.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/ten.TEA.2009.0774DOI Listing
November 2010