Publications by authors named "Yvonne J M van Cauteren"

11 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Left ventricular function, strain, and infarct characteristics in patients with transient ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction compared to ST-segment and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarctions.

Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Imaging 2021 Jul 1. Epub 2021 Jul 1.

Department of Cardiology, Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam Cardiovascular Sciences, De Boelelaan 1117, 1081 HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Aims: This study aims to explore cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR)-derived left ventricular (LV) function, strain, and infarct size characteristics in patients with transient ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (TSTEMI) compared to patients with ST-segment and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarctions (STEMI and NSTEMI, respectively).

Methods And Results: In total, 407 patients were enrolled in this multicentre observational prospective cohort study. All patients underwent CMR examination 2-8 days after the index event. CMR cine imaging was performed for functional assessment and late gadolinium enhancement to determine infarct size and identify microvascular obstruction (MVO). TSTEMI patients demonstrated the highest LV ejection fraction and the most preserved global LV strain (longitudinal, circumferential, and radial) across the three groups (overall P ≤ 0.001). The CMR-defined infarction was less frequently observed in TSTEMI than in STEMI patients [77 (65%) vs. 124 (98%), P < 0.001] but was comparable with NSTEMI patients [77 (65%) vs. 66 (70%), P = 0.44]. A remarkably smaller infarct size was seen in TSTEMI compared to STEMI patients [1.4 g (0.0-3.9) vs. 13.5 g (5.3-26.8), P < 0.001], whereas infarct size was not significantly different from that in NSTEMI patients [1.4 g (0.0-3.9) vs. 2.1 g (0.0-8.6), P = 0.06]. Whilst the presence of MVO was less frequent in TSTEMI compared to STEMI patients [5 (4%) vs. 53 (31%), P < 0.001], no significant difference was seen compared to NSTEMI patients [5 (4%) vs. 5 (5%), P = 0.72].

Conclusion: TSTEMI yielded favourable cardiac LV function, strain, and infarct-related scar mass compared to STEMI and NSTEMI. LV function and infarct characteristics of TSTEMI tend to be more similar to NSTEMI than STEMI.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ehjci/jeab114DOI Listing
July 2021

Cardiovascular magnetic resonance accurately detects obstructive coronary artery disease in suspected non-ST elevation myocardial infarction: a sub-analysis of the CARMENTA Trial.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2021 03 22;23(1):40. Epub 2021 Mar 22.

Department of Cardiology, Maastricht UMC+, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

Background: Invasive coronary angiography (ICA) is still the reference test in suspected non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI), although a substantial number of patients do not have obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD). Early cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) may be a useful gatekeeper for ICA in this setting. The main objective was to investigate the accuracy of CMR to detect obstructive CAD in NSTEMI.

Methods: This study is a sub-analysis of a randomized controlled trial investigating whether a non-invasive imaging-first strategy safely reduced the number of ICA compared to routine clinical care in suspected NSTEMI (acute chest pain, non-diagnostic electrocardiogram, high sensitivity troponin T > 14 ng/L), and included 51 patients who underwent CMR prior to ICA. A stepwise approach was used to assess the diagnostic accuracy of CMR to detect (1) obstructive CAD (diameter stenosis ≥ 70% by ICA) and (2) an adjudicated final diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). First, in all patients the combination of cine, T2-weighted and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging was evaluated for the presence of abnormalities consistent with a coronary etiology in any sequence. Hereafter and only when the scan was normal or equivocal, adenosine stress-perfusion CMR was added.

Results: Of 51 patients included (63 ± 10 years, 51% male), 34 (67%) had obstructive CAD by ICA. The sensitivity, specificity and overall accuracy of the first step to diagnose obstructive CAD were 79%, 71% and 77%, respectively. Additional vasodilator stress-perfusion CMR was performed in 19 patients and combined with step one resulted in an overall sensitivity of 97%, specificity of 65% and accuracy of 86%. Of the remaining 17 patients with non-obstructive CAD, 4 (24%) had evidence for a myocardial infarction on LGE, explaining the modest specificity. The sensitivity, specificity and overall accuracy to diagnose ACS (n = 43) were 88%, 88% and 88%, respectively.

Conclusion: CMR accurately detects obstructive CAD and ACS in suspected NSTEMI. Non-obstructive CAD is common with CMR still identifying an infarction in almost one-quarter of patients. CMR should be considered as an early diagnostic approach in suspected NSTEMI.

Trial Registration: The CARMENTA trial has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov with identifier NCT01559467.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-021-00723-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7983380PMC
March 2021

MINOCA: The caveat of absence of coronary obstruction in myocardial infarction.

Int J Cardiol Heart Vasc 2020 Aug 1;29:100572. Epub 2020 Jul 1.

Department of Cardiology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, the Netherlands.

Aims: Whether patients with MINOCA (myocardial infarction with non-obstructive coronary arteries) have better outcomes than patients with obstructive coronary artery disease remains contradictory. The current study focussed on the clinical profile and prognosis of MINOCA patients.

Methods And Results: We performed a retrospective analysis of patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) admitted to the Isala hospital in Zwolle, the Netherlands, between 2006 and 2014. A total of 7693 patients were categorized into three groups: MINOCA, single-vessel obstructive ACS (SV-ACS), and multi-vessel obstructive ACS (MV-ACS). MINOCA patients (5.2% of the total population) were more likely to be female (51.5% vs. 30.3% and 26.0% in SV-ACS and MV-ACS, respectively, p < 0.001 for both). The prevalence of risk factors in the MINOCA group was in between the SV-ACS and MV-ACS groups. Logistic regression revealed a lower odds of dying in SV-ACS (odds ratio (OR) = 0.70 (p = 0.04)) and a similar odds in MV-ACS (OR = 0.88, p = 0.45) compared to MINOCA.

Conclusions: Patients with MINOCA show an 'intermediate' risk profile with mortality rates in between those of both ACS groups. Hence, MINOCA should be recognised as a potential risk factor for mortality, requiring adequate treatment and follow-up.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijcha.2020.100572DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7334364PMC
August 2020

Thrombo-Inflammation in Cardiovascular Disease: An Expert Consensus Document from the Third Maastricht Consensus Conference on Thrombosis.

Thromb Haemost 2020 Apr 14;120(4):538-564. Epub 2020 Apr 14.

Department of Hematology and Central Hematology Laboratory, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland; Center for Thrombosis and Hemostasis, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz, Germany; Haemostasis Research Unit, University College London, London, United Kingdom.

Thrombo-inflammation describes the complex interplay between blood coagulation and inflammation that plays a critical role in cardiovascular diseases. The third Maastricht Consensus Conference on Thrombosis assembled basic, translational, and clinical scientists to discuss the origin and potential consequences of thrombo-inflammation in the etiology, diagnostics, and management of patients with cardiovascular disease, including myocardial infarction, stroke, and peripheral artery disease. This article presents a state-of-the-art reflection of expert opinions and consensus recommendations regarding the following topics: (1) challenges of the endothelial cell barrier; (2) circulating cells and thrombo-inflammation, focused on platelets, neutrophils, and neutrophil extracellular traps; (3) procoagulant mechanisms; (4) arterial vascular changes in atherogenesis; attenuating atherosclerosis and ischemia/reperfusion injury; (5) management of patients with arterial vascular disease; and (6) pathogenesis of venous thrombosis and late consequences of venous thromboembolism.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0040-1708035DOI Listing
April 2020

Initial Imaging-Guided Strategy Versus Routine Care in Patients With Non-ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction.

J Am Coll Cardiol 2019 11;74(20):2466-2477

Department of Cardiology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, the Netherlands; Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht (CARIM), Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands; Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, the Netherlands. Electronic address:

Background: Patients with non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and elevated high-sensitivity cardiac troponin levels often routinely undergo invasive coronary angiography (ICA), but many do not have obstructive coronary artery disease.

Objectives: This study investigated whether cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) or computed tomographic angiography (CTA) may serve as a safe gatekeeper for ICA.

Methods: This randomized controlled trial (NCT01559467) in 207 patients (age 64 years; 62% male patients) with acute chest pain, elevated high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T levels (>14 ng/l), and inconclusive electrocardiogram compared a CMR- or CTA-first strategy with a control strategy of routine clinical care. Follow-up ICA was recommended when initial CMR or CTA suggested myocardial ischemia, infarction, or obstructive coronary artery disease (≥70% stenosis). Primary efficacy and secondary safety endpoints were referral to ICA during hospitalization and 1-year outcomes (major adverse cardiac events and complications), respectively.

Results: The CMR- and CTA-first strategies reduced ICA compared with routine clinical care (87% [p = 0.001], 66% [p < 0.001], and 100%, respectively), with similar outcome (hazard ratio: CMR vs. routine, 0.78 [95% confidence interval: 0.37 to 1.61]; CTA vs. routine, 0.66 [95% confidence interval: 0.31 to 1.42]; and CMR vs. CTA, 1.19 [95% confidence interval: 0.53 to 2.66]). Obstructive coronary artery disease after ICA was found in 61% of patients in the routine clinical care arm, in 69% in the CMR-first arm (p = 0.308 vs. routine), and in 85% in the CTA-first arm (p = 0.006 vs. routine). In the non-CMR and non-CTA arms, follow-up CMR and CTA were performed in 67% and 13% of patients and led to a new diagnosis in 33% and 3%, respectively (p < 0.001).

Conclusions: A novel strategy of implementing CMR or CTA first in the diagnostic process in non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction is a safe gatekeeper for ICA.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacc.2019.09.027DOI Listing
November 2019

Clinical assessment of aortic valve stenosis: Comparison between 4D flow MRI and transthoracic echocardiography.

J Magn Reson Imaging 2020 02 30;51(2):472-480. Epub 2019 Jun 30.

Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, the Netherlands.

Background: The prevalence of valvular aortic stenosis (AS) increases as the population ages. Echocardiographic measurements of peak jet velocity (V ), mean pressure gradient (P ), and aortic valve area (AVA) determine AS severity and play a pivotal role in the stratification towards valvular replacement. A multimodality imaging approach might be needed in cases of uncertainty about the actual severity of the stenosis.

Purpose: To compare four-dimensional phase-contrast magnetic resonance (4D PC-MR), two-dimensional (2D) PC-MR, and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) for quantification of AS.

Study Type: Prospective.

Population: Twenty patients with various degrees of AS (69.3 ± 5.0 years).

Field Strength/sequences: 4D PC-MR and 2D PC-MR at 3T.

Assessment: We compared V , P , and AVA between TTE, 4D PC-MR, and 2D PC-MR. Flow eccentricity was quantified by means of normalized flow displacement, and its influence on the accuracy of TTE measurements was investigated.

Statistical Tests: Pearson's correlation, Bland-Altman analysis, paired t-test, and intraclass correlation coefficient.

Results: 4D PC-MR measured higher V (r = 0.95, mean difference + 16.4 ± 10.7%, P <0.001), and P (r = 0.92, mean difference + 14.9 ± 16.0%, P = 0.013), but a less critical AVA (r = 0.80, mean difference + 19.9 ± 20.6%, P = 0.002) than TTE. In contrast, unidirectional 2D PC-MR substantially underestimated AS severity when compared with TTE. Differences in V between 4D PC-MR and TTE showed to be strongly correlated with the eccentricity of the flow jet (r = 0.89, P <0.001). Use of 4D PC-MR improved the concordance between V and AVA (from 0.68 to 0.87), and between PG and AVA (from 0.68 to 0.86).

Data Conclusion: 4D PC-MR improves the concordance between the different AS parameters and could serve as an additional imaging technique next to TTE. Future studies should address the potential value of 4D PC-MR in patients with discordant echocardiographic parameters.

Level Of Evidence: 2 Technical Efficacy: Stage 2 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2020;51:472-480.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmri.26847DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7004028PMC
February 2020

[Risk stratification and role for additional diagnostic testing in patients with acute chest pain and normal high-sensitivity cardiac troponin levels].

Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd 2018 12 5;162. Epub 2018 Dec 5.

Maastricht UMC+, afd. Cardiologie.

Background: Normal high sensitivity cardiac troponin (hs-cTn) assays rule out acute myocardial infarction (AMI) with great accuracy, but additional non-invasive testing is frequently ordered. This observational study evaluates whether clinical characteristics can contribute to risk stratification and could guide referral for additional testing.

Methods: This observational study included 918 patients with acute chest pain and normal hs-cTnT values. Major adverse cardiac events (MACE) and non-invasive test results were assessed during one-year follow-up. Patients were classified as low and high risk based on clinical characteristics.

Results: In total, 6,4% of patients experienced MACE during follow-up and mainly comprised revascularisations (86%). Absence of both recent abnormal stress test and suspicious history identified 86% of patients. These patients were at very low risk for MACE (0,4% in 30-days). Despite this, the majority (287/345=83%) of additional tests were performed in low risk patients, with 8% abnormal test findings (positive predictive value for MACE was 17%). The diagnostic yield was significantly higher in the remaining higher risk patients, 40% abnormal test findings and a positive predictive value of 70% for MACE.

Conclusion: Clinical characteristics can be used to identify low risk patients with acute chest pain and normal hs-cTnT levels. Current strategies in the emergency department result in numerous additional tests, which are mostly ordered in patients at very low risk and have a low diagnostic yield.
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December 2018

Risk stratification and role for additional diagnostic testing in patients with acute chest pain and normal high-sensitivity cardiac troponin levels.

PLoS One 2018 7;13(9):e0203506. Epub 2018 Sep 7.

Department of Cardiology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

Background: Normal high sensitivity cardiac troponin (hs-cTn) assays rule out acute myocardial infarction (AMI) with great accuracy, but additional non-invasive testing is frequently ordered. This observational study evaluates whether clinical characteristics can contribute to risk stratification and could guide referral for additional testing.

Methods: 918 serial patients with acute chest pain and normal hs-cTnT levels were prospectively included. Major adverse cardiac events (MACE) and non-invasive test results were assessed during one-year follow-up. Patients were classified as low and high risk based on clinical characteristics.

Results: MACE occurred in 6.1% of patients and mainly comprised revascularizations (86%). A recent abnormal stress test, suspicious history, a positive family history and higher baseline hs-cTnT levels were independent predictors of MACE with odds ratios of 16.00 (95%CI:6.25-40.96), 16.43 (6.36-42.45), 2.33 (1.22-4.42) and 1.10 (1.01-1.21), respectively. Absence of both recent abnormal stress test and suspicious history identified 86% of patients. These patients were at very low risk for MACE (0.4% in 30-days and 2.3% in one-year). Despite this, the majority (287/345 = 83%) of additional tests were performed in low risk patients, with <10% abnormal test findings. The diagnostic yield was significantly higher in the remaining higher risk patients, 40% abnormal test findings and a positive predictive value of 70% for MACE. Similar results were observed in patients without known coronary artery disease.

Conclusions: Clinical characteristics can be used to identify low risk patients with acute chest pain and normal hs-cTnT levels. Current strategies in the emergency department result in numerous additional tests, which are mostly ordered in patients at very low risk and have a low diagnostic yield.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0203506PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6128560PMC
February 2019

Menaquinone-7 Supplementation to Reduce Vascular Calcification in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease: Rationale and Study Protocol (VitaK-CAC Trial).

Nutrients 2015 Oct 28;7(11):8905-15. Epub 2015 Oct 28.

Department of Internal Medicine, Maastricht University Medical Centre (MUMC+), Maastricht 6229HX, The Netherlands.

Coronary artery calcification (CAC) develops early in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and is a strong and independent predictor of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Arterial calcification is caused by an imbalance in calcification regulatory mechanisms. An important inhibitor of calcification is vitamin K-dependent matrix Gla protein (MGP). Both preclinical and clinical studies have shown that inhibition of the vitamin K-cycle by vitamin K antagonists (VKA) results in elevated uncarboxylated MGP (ucMGP) and subsequently in extensive arterial calcification. This led us to hypothesize that vitamin K supplementation may slow down the progression of calcification. To test this, we designed the VitaK-CAC trial which analyses effects of menaquinone-7 (MK-7) supplementation on progression of CAC. The trial is a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial including patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Patients with a baseline Agatston CAC-score between 50 and 400 will be randomized to an intervention-group (360 microgram MK-7) or a placebo group. Treatment duration will be 24 months. The primary endpoint is the difference in CAC-score progression between both groups. Secondary endpoints include changes in arterial structure and function, and associations with biomarkers. We hypothesize that treatment with MK-7 will slow down or arrest the progression of CAC and that this trial may lead to a treatment option for vascular calcification and subsequent CVD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu7115443DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4663571PMC
October 2015

On the Cornell Assessment for Pediatric Delirium and both the diagnostic and statistical manual, 5th edition, and International Classification of Diseases, 11th revision: quo vadis?*.

Crit Care Med 2014 Mar;42(3):751-2

Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Division Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, The Netherlands;, Koraalgroep, Sittard, The Netherlands; and, Mutsaersstichting Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Hospital, Venlo, The Netherlands Mutsaersstichting Child andAdolescent Psychiatric Hospital, Venlo, The Netherlands; and, Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience, Maastricht, The Netherlands Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Division Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.ccm.0000435686.08339.b6DOI Listing
March 2014
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