Publications by authors named "Yvonne C Lussi"

5 Publications

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JMJD-1.2 controls multiple histone post-translational modifications in germ cells and protects the genome from replication stress.

Sci Rep 2018 02 28;8(1):3765. Epub 2018 Feb 28.

Biotech Research & Innovation Centre (BRIC), University of Copenhagen, Ole Maaløes Vej 5, DK-2200, Copenhagen N, Denmark.

Post-translational modifications of histones, constitutive components of chromatin, regulate chromatin compaction and control all DNA-based cellular processes. C. elegans JMJD-1.2, a member of the KDM7 family, is a demethylase active towards several lysine residues on Histone 3 (H3), but its contribution in regulating histone methylation in germ cells has not been fully investigated. Here, we show that jmjd-1.2 is expressed abundantly in the germline where it controls the level of histone 3 lysine 9, lysine 23 and lysine 27 di-methylation (H3K9/K23/K27me2) both in mitotic and meiotic cells. Loss of jmjd-1.2 is not associated with major defects in the germ cells in animals grown under normal conditions or after DNA damage induced by UV or ionizing irradiation. However, jmjd-1.2 mutants are more sensitive to replication stress and the progeny of mutant animals exposed to hydroxyurea show increased embryonic lethality and mutational rate, compared to wild-type. Thus, our results suggest a role for jmjd-1.2 in the maintenance of genome integrity after replication stress and emphasize the relevance of the regulation of histone methylation in genomic stability.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-21914-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5830613PMC
February 2018

Impaired removal of H3K4 methylation affects cell fate determination and gene transcription.

Development 2016 10 30;143(20):3751-3762. Epub 2016 Aug 30.

Biotech Research and Innovation Centre (BRIC), University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen DK-2200, Denmark

Methylation of histone 3 lysine 4 (H3K4) is largely associated with promoters and enhancers of actively transcribed genes and is finely regulated during development by the action of histone methyltransferases and demethylases. H3K4me3 demethylases of the KDM5 family have been previously implicated in development, but how the regulation of H3K4me3 level controls developmental processes is not fully established. Here, we show that the H3K4 demethylase RBR-2, the unique member of the KDM5 family in C. elegans, acts cell-autonomously and in a catalytic-dependent manner to control vulva precursor cells fate acquisition, by promoting the LIN-12/Notch pathway. Using genome-wide approaches, we show that RBR-2 reduces the H3K4me3 level at transcription start sites (TSSs) and in regions upstream of the TSSs, and acts both as a transcription repressor and activator. Analysis of the lin-11 genetic locus, a direct RBR-2 target gene required for vulva precursor cell fate acquisition, shows that RBR-2 controls the epigenetic signature of the lin-11 vulva-specific enhancer and lin-11 expression, providing in vivo evidence that RBR-2 can positively regulate transcription and cell fate acquisition by controlling enhancer activity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.139139DOI Listing
October 2016

The H3K4me3/2 histone demethylase RBR-2 controls axon guidance by repressing the actin-remodeling gene wsp-1.

Development 2016 Mar 25;143(5):851-63. Epub 2016 Jan 25.

Biotech Research & Innovation Centre (BRIC), University of Copenhagen, 2200 Copenhagen, Denmark Centre for Epigenetics, University of Copenhagen, 2200 Copenhagen, Denmark

The dynamic regulation of histone modifications is important for modulating transcriptional programs during development. Aberrant H3K4 methylation is associated with neurological disorders, but how the levels and the recognition of this modification affect specific neuronal processes is unclear. Here, we show that RBR-2, the sole homolog of the KDM5 family of H3K4me3/2 demethylases in Caenorhabditis elegans, ensures correct axon guidance by controlling the expression of the actin regulator wsp-1. Loss of rbr-2 results in increased levels of H3K4me3 at the transcriptional start site of wsp-1, with concomitant higher wsp-1 expression responsible for defective axon guidance. In agreement, overexpression of WSP-1 mimics rbr-2 loss, and its depletion restores normal axon guidance in rbr-2 mutants. NURF-1, an H3K4me3-binding protein and member of the chromatin-remodeling complex NURF, is required for promoting aberrant wsp-1 transcription in rbr-2 mutants and its ablation restores wild-type expression of wsp-1 and axon guidance. Thus, our results establish a precise role for epigenetic regulation in neuronal development by demonstrating a functional link between RBR-2 activity, H3K4me3 levels, the NURF complex and the expression of WSP-1.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.132985DOI Listing
March 2016

The nucleoporin Nup153 affects spindle checkpoint activity due to an association with Mad1.

Nucleus 2010 Jan-Feb;1(1):71-84

M.E. Müller Institute for Structural Biology, Biozentrum, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.

The nucleoporin Nup153 is known to play pivotal roles in nuclear import and export in interphase cells and as the cell transitions into mitosis, Nup153 is involved in nuclear envelope breakdown. In this study, we demonstrate that the interaction of Nup153 with the spindle assembly checkpoint protein Mad1 is important in the regulation of the spindle checkpoint. Overexpression of human Nup153 in HeLa cells leads to the appearance of multinucleated cells and induces the formation of multipolar spindles. Importantly, it causes inactivation of the spindle checkpoint due to hypophosphorylation of Mad1. Depletion of Nup153 using RNA interference results in the decline of Mad1 at nuclear pores during interphase and more significantly causes a delayed dissociation of Mad1 from kinetochores in metaphase and an increase in the number of unresolved midbodies. In the absence of Nup153 the spindle checkpoint remains active. In vitro studies indicate direct binding of Mad1 to the N-terminal domain of Nup153. Importantly, Nup153 binding to Mad1 affects Mad1's phosphorylation status, but not its ability to interact with Mad2. Our data suggest that Nup153 levels regulate the localization of Mad1 during the metaphase/anaphase transition thereby affecting its phoshorylation status and in turn spindle checkpoint activity and mitotic exit.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4161/nucl.1.1.10244DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3035126PMC
June 2012

The nucleoporin Nup88 is interacting with nuclear lamin A.

Mol Biol Cell 2011 Apr 2;22(7):1080-90. Epub 2011 Feb 2.

M.E. Müller Institute for Structural Biology, Biozentrum, University of Basel, 4056 Basel, Switzerland.

Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are embedded in the nuclear envelope (NE) and mediate bidirectional nucleocytoplasmic transport. Their spatial distribution in the NE is organized by the nuclear lamina, a meshwork of nuclear intermediate filament proteins. Major constituents of the nuclear lamina are A- and B-type lamins. In this work we show that the nuclear pore protein Nup88 binds lamin A in vitro and in vivo. The interaction is mediated by the N-terminus of Nup88, and Nup88 specifically binds the tail domain of lamin A but not of lamins B1 and B2. Expression of green fluorescent protein-tagged lamin A in cells causes a masking of binding sites for Nup88 antibodies in immunofluorescence assays, supporting the interaction of lamin A with Nup88 in a cellular context. The epitope masking disappears in cells expressing mutants of lamin A that are associated with laminopathic diseases. Consistently, an interaction of Nup88 with these mutants is disrupted in vitro. Immunoelectron microscopy using Xenopus laevis oocyte nuclei further revealed that Nup88 localizes to the cytoplasmic and nuclear face of the NPC. Together our data suggest that a pool of Nup88 on the nuclear side of the NPC provides a novel, unexpected binding site for nuclear lamin A.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1091/mbc.E10-05-0463DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3069011PMC
April 2011
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