Publications by authors named "Yvonne Barnes"

6 Publications

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Stories and Music for Adolescent/Young Adult Resilience During Transplant Partnerships: Strategies to Support Academic-Clinical Nurse Collaborations in Behavioral Intervention Studies.

Clin Nurse Spec 2017 Jul/Aug;31(4):195-200

Author Affiliations: Associate Professor (DrHendricks-Ferguson), School of Nursing, Saint Louis University, Missouri; Pediatric Nurse Practitioner (Dr Barnes), Swansea, Illinois; Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Future of Nursing Scholar, PhD Student (Ms Cherven), School of Nursing, University of Alabama at Birmingham; Nurse Researcher (Dr Stegenga), Children's Mercy Hospital, Kansas, Missouri; Consultant (Ms Roll), Department of Pediatrics, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Associate Professor (Dr Docherty), School of Nursing, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina; and Holmquist Professor of Pediatric Oncology Nursing (Dr Haase), School of Nursing, Indiana University, Indianapolis.

Evidence-based nursing is in the forefront of healthcare delivery systems. Federal and state agencies, academic institutions, and healthcare delivery systems recognize the importance of nursing research. This article describes the mechanisms that facilitate nursing partnerships yielding high-level research outcomes in a clinical setting. A phase-II multicenter behavioral intervention study with pediatric stem cell transplant patients was the context of this academic/clinical research partnership. Strategies to develop and maintain this partnership involved a thorough understanding of each nurse's focus and barriers. A variety of communication plans and training events maximized preexisting professional networks. Academic/clinical nurses' discussions identified barriers to the research process, the most significant being role conflict. Communication and validation of benefits to each individual and institution facilitated the research process during challenging times. Establishing strong academic/clinical partnerships should lead to evidence-based research outcomes for the nursing profession, healthcare delivery systems, and patients and families.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NUR.0000000000000305DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5918340PMC
September 2017

The addition of sirolimus to tacrolimus/methotrexate GVHD prophylaxis in children with ALL: a phase 3 Children's Oncology Group/Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplant Consortium trial.

Blood 2014 Mar 4;123(13):2017-25. Epub 2014 Feb 4.

Division of Hematology and Hematological Malignancies, Huntsman Cancer Institute/University of Utah School of Medicine, Primary Children's Hospital, Salt Lake City, UT;

Sirolimus has activity against acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in xenograft models and efficacy in preventing acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD). We tested whether addition of sirolimus to GVHD prophylaxis of children with ALL would decrease aGVHD and relapse. Patients were randomized to tacrolimus/methotrexate (standard) or tacrolimus/methotrexate/sirolimus (experimental). The study met futility rules for survival after enrolling 146 of 259 patients. Rate of Grade 2-4 aGVHD was 31% vs 18% (standard vs experimental, P = .04), however, grade 3-4 aGVHD was not different (13% vs 10%, P = .28). Rates of veno-occlusive disease (VOD) and thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) were lower in the nonsirolimus arm (9% vs 21% VOD, P = .05; 1% vs 10% TMA, P = .06). At 2 years, event free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) were 56% vs 46%, and 65% vs 55% (standard vs experimental), respectively (P = .28 and .23). Multivariate analysis showed increased relapse risk in children with ≥0.1% minimal residual disease (MRD) pretransplant, and decreased risk in patients with grades 1-3 aGVHD (P = .04). Grades 1-3 aGVHD were associated with improved EFS (P = .02), whereas grade 4 aGVHD and extramedullary disease at diagnosis led to inferior OS. Although addition of sirolimus decreased aGVHD, survival was not improved. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov as #NCT00382109.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood-2013-10-534297DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3968388PMC
March 2014

Engaging nurses in research for a randomized clinical trial of a behavioral health intervention.

Nurs Res Pract 2013 11;2013:183984. Epub 2013 Sep 11.

The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 333 North Santa Rosa, San Antonio, TX 78207, USA.

Nurse involvement in research is essential to the expansion of nursing science and improved care for patients. The research participation challenges encountered by nurses providing direct care (direct care nurses) include balancing patient care demands with research, adjusting to fluctuating staff and patient volumes, working with interdisciplinary personnel, and feeling comfortable with their knowledge of the research process. The purpose of this paper is to describe efforts to engage nurses in research for the Stories and Music for Adolescent/Young Adult Resilience during Transplant (SMART) study. SMART was an NIH-funded, multisite, randomized, behavioral clinical trial of a music therapy intervention for adolescents/young adults (AYA) undergoing stem cell transplant for an oncology condition. The study was conducted at 8 sites by a large multidisciplinary team that included direct care nurses, advanced practice nurses, and nurse researchers, as well as board-certified music therapists, clinical research coordinators, and physicians. Efforts to include direct care nurses in the conduct of this study fostered mutual respect across disciplines in both academic and clinical settings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/183984DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3786524PMC
October 2013

Low frequency of telomerase RNA mutations among children with aplastic anemia or myelodysplastic syndrome.

J Pediatr Hematol Oncol 2006 Jul;28(7):450-3

Department of Pathology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA.

Mutations in TERC, the RNA component of telomerase, result in autosomal dominant dyskeratosis congenita (DC), a rare bone marrow failure syndrome. TERC mutations have been detected in a subset of patients previously diagnosed with aplastic anemia and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and these TERC mutations are clinically relevant as patients with DC respond poorly to conventional therapies. We aimed to determine the frequency of TERC mutations in pediatric patients with aplastic anemia and MDS who required a hematopoietic stem cell transplant. We obtained 284 blood samples from the National Donor Marrow Program Research Sample Repository from children and adolescents with bone marrow failure who underwent an unrelated stem cell transplant. We screened these samples for mutations in the TERC gene using direct DNA sequencing. We found 2 patients with sequence alterations in TERC. We identified a 2 base pair deletion (-240delCT) in a 4-year-old child with MDS and a single nucleotide alteration (-99-->CG) in a 1-year-old child with juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia. Screening for TERC gene mutations is unlikely to diagnose occult DC in children with severe bone marrow failure who require a hematopoietic stem cell transplant.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.mph.0000212952.58597.84DOI Listing
July 2006

Pretransplant conditioning in adults and children: dose assurance with intravenous busulfan.

Oncol Nurs Forum 2006 Nov 3;33(2):E36-43. Epub 2006 Nov 3.

Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplant Program, University Hospitals of Cleveland, USA.

Purpose/objectives: To provide clinical insights into dosing and administration of IV busulfan, a conditioning agent for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT).

Data Sources: Review of published literature related to busulfan pretransplant conditioning using MEDLINE. Meeting abstracts, investigational protocols, and pharmaceutical manufacturers' package inserts also were reviewed.

Data Synthesis: Busulfan is an effective myeloablative conditioning agent for HSCT. The IV formulation increases dose assurance and the ability to target a therapeutic window. Therapeutic drug monitoring ensures that targeted blood levels are achieved, especially in children, thereby preventing underdosing, which can lead to disease progression or rejection, as well as overdosing, which can cause an increased risk of toxic side effects.

Conclusions: IV busulfan is a convenient, safe, and effective conditioning agent used in HSCT that has a predictable pharmacokinetic profile.

Implications For Nursing: An understanding of the pharmacokinetic principles underlying the relationship between the therapeutic window for busulfan and optimal HSCT outcomes will facilitate proper dosing and administration of IV busulfan.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1188/06.ONF.E36-E43DOI Listing
November 2006

NIST High Accuracy Reference Reflectometer-Spectrophotometer.

J Res Natl Inst Stand Technol 1996 Sep-Oct;101(5):619-627

National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-0001.

A new reflectometer-spectrophotometer has been designed and constructed using state-of-the-art technology to enhance optical properties of materials measurements over the ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared (UV-Vis-NIR) wavelength range (200 nm to 2500 nm). The instrument, Spectral Tri-function Automated Reference Reflectometer (STARR), is capable of measuring specular and diffuse reflectance, bidirectional reflectance distribution function () of diffuse samples, and both diffuse and non-diffuse transmittance. Samples up to 30 cm by 30 cm can be measured. The instrument and its characterization are described.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.6028/jres.101.061DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4907617PMC
January 1996