Publications by authors named "Yves Goddéris"

7 Publications

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Past climates inform our future.

Science 2020 11;370(6517)

Department of Oceanography, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA.

As the world warms, there is a profound need to improve projections of climate change. Although the latest Earth system models offer an unprecedented number of features, fundamental uncertainties continue to cloud our view of the future. Past climates provide the only opportunity to observe how the Earth system responds to high carbon dioxide, underlining a fundamental role for paleoclimatology in constraining future climate change. Here, we review the relevancy of paleoclimate information for climate prediction and discuss the prospects for emerging methodologies to further insights gained from past climates. Advances in proxy methods and interpretations pave the way for the use of past climates for model evaluation-a practice that we argue should be widely adopted.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.aay3701DOI Listing
November 2020

Emergence of the Southeast Asian islands as a driver for Neogene cooling.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2020 10 24;117(41):25319-25326. Epub 2020 Sep 24.

Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720.

Steep topography, a tropical climate, and mafic lithologies contribute to efficient chemical weathering and carbon sequestration in the Southeast Asian islands. Ongoing arc-continent collision between the Sunda-Banda arc system and Australia has increased the area of subaerially exposed land in the region since the mid-Miocene. Concurrently, Earth's climate has cooled since the Miocene Climatic Optimum, leading to growth of the Antarctic ice sheet and the onset of Northern Hemisphere glaciation. We seek to evaluate the hypothesis that the emergence of the Southeast Asian islands played a significant role in driving this cooling trend through increasing global weatherability. To do so, we have compiled paleoshoreline data and incorporated them into GEOCLIM, which couples a global climate model to a silicate weathering model with spatially resolved lithology. We find that without the increase in area of the Southeast Asian islands over the Neogene, atmospheric CO would have been significantly higher than preindustrial values, remaining above the levels necessary for initiating Northern Hemisphere ice sheets.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2011033117DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7568243PMC
October 2020

Human-induced nitrogen-phosphorus imbalances alter natural and managed ecosystems across the globe.

Nat Commun 2013 ;4:2934

Research Group of Plant and Vegetation Ecology (PLECO), Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, B-2610 Wilrijk, Belgium.

The availability of carbon from rising atmospheric carbon dioxide levels and of nitrogen from various human-induced inputs to ecosystems is continuously increasing; however, these increases are not paralleled by a similar increase in phosphorus inputs. The inexorable change in the stoichiometry of carbon and nitrogen relative to phosphorus has no equivalent in Earth's history. Here we report the profound and yet uncertain consequences of the human imprint on the phosphorus cycle and nitrogen:phosphorus stoichiometry for the structure, functioning and diversity of terrestrial and aquatic organisms and ecosystems. A mass balance approach is used to show that limited phosphorus and nitrogen availability are likely to jointly reduce future carbon storage by natural ecosystems during this century. Further, if phosphorus fertilizers cannot be made increasingly accessible, the crop yields projections of the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment imply an increase of the nutrient deficit in developing regions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms3934DOI Listing
July 2014

Earth science: Mountains without erosion.

Authors:
Yves Goddéris

Nature 2010 May;465(7295):169-71

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/465169aDOI Listing
May 2010

Biogeochemistry: Climatic plant power.

Nature 2009 Jul;460(7251):40-1

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/460040aDOI Listing
July 2009

Carbon cycling and snowball Earth.

Nature 2008 Dec;456(7224):E8; author reply E9-10

The possibility that Earth witnessed episodes of global glaciation during the latest Precambrian challenges our understanding of the physical processes controlling the Earth's climate. Peltier et al. suggest that a 'hard snowball Earth' state may have been prevented owing to the release of CO(2) from the oxidation of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the ocean as the temperature decreased. Here we show that the model of Peltier et al. is not self-consistent as it implies large fluctuations of the ocean alkalinity content without providing any processes to account for it. Our findings suggest that the hard snowball Earth hypothesis is still valid.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature07653DOI Listing
December 2008

A 'snowball Earth' climate triggered by continental break-up through changes in runoff.

Nature 2004 Mar;428(6980):303-6

Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement, CNRS-CEA, 91191, Gif sur Yvette, France.

Geological and palaeomagnetic studies indicate that ice sheets may have reached the Equator at the end of the Proterozoic eon, 800 to 550 million years ago, leading to the suggestion of a fully ice-covered 'snowball Earth'. Climate model simulations indicate that such a snowball state for the Earth depends on anomalously low atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations, in addition to the Sun being 6 per cent fainter than it is today. However, the mechanisms producing such low carbon dioxide concentrations remain controversial. Here we assess the effect of the palaeogeographic changes preceding the Sturtian glacial period, 750 million years ago, on the long-term evolution of atmospheric carbon dioxide levels using the coupled climate-geochemical model GEOCLIM. In our simulation, the continental break-up of Rodinia leads to an increase in runoff and hence consumption of carbon dioxide through continental weathering that decreases atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations by 1,320 p.p.m. This indicates that tectonic changes could have triggered a progressive transition from a 'greenhouse' to an 'icehouse' climate during the Neoproterozoic era. When we combine these results with the concomitant weathering effect of the voluminous basaltic traps erupted throughout the break-up of Rodinia, our simulation results in a snowball glaciation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature02408DOI Listing
March 2004