Publications by authors named "Yuya Matsue"

89 Publications

Aspartate aminotransferase to alanine aminotransferase ratio is associated with frailty and mortality in older patients with heart failure.

Sci Rep 2021 Jun 7;11(1):11957. Epub 2021 Jun 7.

Department of Cardiovascular Biology and Medicine, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.

Frailty is a common comorbidity associated with adverse events in patients with heart failure, and early recognition is key to improving its management. We hypothesized that the AST to ALT ratio (AAR) could be a marker of frailty in patients with heart failure. Data from the FRAGILE-HF study were analyzed. A total of 1327 patients aged ≥ 65 years hospitalized with heart failure were categorized into three groups based on their AAR at discharge: low AAR (AAR < 1.16, n = 434); middle AAR (1.16 ≤ AAR < 1.70, n = 487); high AAR (AAR ≥ 1.70, n = 406). The primary endpoint was one-year mortality. The association between AAR and physical function was also assessed. High AAR was associated with lower short physical performance battery and shorter 6-min walk distance, and these associations were independent of age and sex. Logistic regression analysis revealed that high AAR was an independent marker of physical frailty after adjustment for age, sex and body mass index. During follow-up, all-cause death occurred in 161 patients. After adjusting for confounding factors, high AAR was associated with all-cause death (low AAR vs. high AAR, hazard ratio: 1.57, 95% confidence interval, 1.02-2.42; P = 0.040). In conclusion, AAR is a marker of frailty and prognostic for all-cause mortality in older patients with heart failure.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-91368-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8184951PMC
June 2021

Utility of cyclic variation of heart rate score as a screening tool for sleep-disordered breathing in patients with heart failure.

J Clin Sleep Med 2021 May 20. Epub 2021 May 20.

Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.

Study Objectives: Patients with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) have cyclic variation of heart rate (CVHR) in response to respiratory events. However, limited data are available regarding the utility of CVHR as a screening tool for SDB in mixed heart failure (HF) and non-HF patients.

Methods: We enrolled consecutive patients with and without HF who underwent full polysomnographies with simultaneous Holter electrocardiogram monitoring. We determined the temporal position of the individual dips comprising the CVHR score using time-domain methods.

Results: The data of 101 patients, including 70 with and 31 without HF, were analyzed. The CVHR score was significantly correlated with the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) (r = 0.667, P < 0.001) and limits of agreement between the AHI and CVHR score were -21.8 to 35.2. The receiver operating characteristic analysis demonstrated that the CVHR score (best cut-off of 23.5 events/h) identified severe SDB with a sensitivity of 83.3%, specificity of 79.5%, and the area under the curve of 0.856. In addition, there was no interaction between the presence or absence of HF and the AHI-CVHR score relationship (P = 0.323).

Conclusions: The CVHR score, determined by Holter electrocardiogram monitoring, is a useful tool for evaluating SDB even in mixed HF and non-HF patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5664/jcsm.9422DOI Listing
May 2021

Correction to: Multidomain Frailty in Heart Failure: Current Status and Future Perspectives.

Curr Heart Fail Rep 2021 Jun;18(3):121

Department of Cardiovascular Biology and Medicine, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8421, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11897-021-00516-zDOI Listing
June 2021

Validation of telemedicine-based self-assessment of vital signs for patients with COVID-19: A pilot study.

J Telemed Telecare 2021 May 9:1357633X211011825. Epub 2021 May 9.

Department of Digital Health and Telemedicine R&D, Juntendo University, Japan.

Introduction: In the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the development of a system that would prevent the infection of healthcare providers is in urgent demand. We sought to investigate the feasibility and validity of a telemedicine-based system in which healthcare providers remotely check the vital signs measured by patients with COVID-19.

Methods: Patients hospitalized with confirmed or suspected COVID-19 measured and uploaded their vital signs to secure cloud storage. Additionally, the respiratory rates were monitored using a mat-type sensor placed under the bed. We assessed the time until the values became available on the Cloud and the agreements between the patient-measured vital signs and simultaneous healthcare provider measurements.

Results: Between 26 May-23 September 2020, 3835 vital signs were measured and uploaded to the cloud storage by the patients (=16, median 72 years old, 31% women). All patients successfully learned how to use these devices with a 10-minute lecture. The median time until the measurements were available on the cloud system was only 0.35 min, and 95.2% of the vital signs were available within 5 min of the measurement. The agreement between the patients' and healthcare providers' measurements was excellent for all parameters. Interclass coefficient correlations were as follows: systolic (0.92, <0.001), diastolic blood pressure (0.86, <0.001), heart rate (0.89, <0.001), peripheral oxygen saturation (0.92, <0.001), body temperature (0.83, <0.001), and respiratory rates (0.90, <0.001).

Conclusions: Telemedicine-based self-assessment of vital signs in patients with COVID-19 was feasible and reliable. The system will be a useful alternative to traditional vital sign measurements by healthcare providers during the COVID-19 pandemic.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1357633X211011825DOI Listing
May 2021

Clinical and Biomarker Profiles and Prognosis of Elderly Patients With Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) With Cardiovascular Diseases and/or Risk Factors.

Circ J 2021 05 29;85(6):921-928. Epub 2021 Apr 29.

Department of Cardiovascular Biology and Medicine, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine.

Background: This study investigated the effects of age on the outcomes of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and on cardiac biomarker profiles, especially in patients with cardiovascular diseases and/or risk factors (CVDRF).Methods and Results:A nationwide multicenter retrospective study included 1,518 patients with COVID-19. Of these patients, 693 with underlying CVDRF were analyzed; patients were divided into age groups (<55, 55-64, 65-79, and ≥80 years) and in-hospital mortality and age-specific clinical and cardiac biomarker profiles on admission evaluated. Overall, the mean age of patients was 68 years, 449 (64.8%) were male, and 693 (45.7%) had underlying CVDRF. Elderly (≥80 years) patients had a significantly higher risk of in-hospital mortality regardless of concomitant CVDRF than younger patients (P<0.001). Typical characteristics related to COVID-19, including symptoms and abnormal findings on baseline chest X-ray and computed tomography scans, were significantly less prevalent in the elderly group than in the younger groups. However, a significantly (P<0.001) higher proportion of elderly patients were positive for cardiac troponin (cTn), and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and N-terminal pro BNP (NT-proBNP) levels on admission were significantly higher among elderly than younger patients (P<0.001 and P=0.001, respectively).

Conclusions: Elderly patients with COVID-19 had a higher risk of mortality during the hospital course, regardless of their history of CVDRF, were more likely to be cTn positive, and had significantly higher BNP/NT-proBNP levels than younger patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1253/circj.CJ-21-0160DOI Listing
May 2021

Association Between Statin Use Prior to Admission and Lower Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Severity in Patients With Cardiovascular Disease or Risk Factors.

Circ J 2021 05 29;85(6):939-943. Epub 2021 Apr 29.

Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Toho University Graduate School of Medicine.

Background: Cardiovascular diseases and/or risk factors (CVDRF) have been reported as risk factors for severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).Methods and Results:In total, we selected 693 patients with CVDRF from the CLAVIS-COVID database of 1,518 cases in Japan. The mean age was 68 years (35% females). Statin use was reported by 31% patients at admission. Statin users exhibited lower incidence of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) insertion (1.4% vs. 4.6%, odds ratio [OR]: 0.295, P=0.037) and septic shock (1.4% vs. 6.5%, OR: 0.205, P=0.004) despite having more comorbidities such as diabetes mellitus.

Conclusions: This study suggests the potential benefits of statins use against COVID-19.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1253/circj.CJ-21-0087DOI Listing
May 2021

Multidomain Frailty in Heart Failure: Current Status and Future Perspectives.

Curr Heart Fail Rep 2021 Jun 9;18(3):107-120. Epub 2021 Apr 9.

Department of Cardiovascular Biology and Medicine, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8421, Japan.

Purpose Of Review: With a worldwide aging population, frailty and heart failure (HF) have become issues that need to be addressed urgently in cardiovascular clinical practice. In this review, we outline the clinical implications of frailty in HF patients and the potential therapeutic strategies to improve the clinical outcomes of frail patients with HF.

Recent Findings: Frailty has physical, psychological, and social domains, each of which is a prognostic determinant for patients with HF, and each domain overlaps with the other, although there are no standardized criteria for diagnosing frailty. Frailty can be targeted for treatment with various interventions, and recent studies have suggested that multidisciplinary intervention could be a promising option for frail patients with HF. However, currently, there is limited data, and further research is needed before its clinical implementation. Frailty and HF share a common background and are strongly associated with each other. More comprehensive assessment and therapeutic interventions for frailty need to be developed to further improve the prognosis and quality of life of frail patients with HF.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11897-021-00513-2DOI Listing
June 2021

Seroprevalence of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in Japanese COVID-19 patients.

PLoS One 2021 6;16(4):e0249449. Epub 2021 Apr 6.

Department of General Medicine, Juntendo University Faculty of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.

Objectives: To determine the seroprevalence of anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG and IgM antibodies in symptomatic Japanese COVID-19 patients.

Methods: Serum samples (n = 114) from 34 COVID-19 patients with mild to critical clinical manifestations were examined. The presence and titers of IgG antibody for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) were determined by a chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay (CMIA) using Alinity i SARS-CoV-2 IgG and by an immunochromatographic (IC) IgM/IgG antibody assay using the Anti-SARS-CoV-2 Rapid Test.

Results: IgG was detected by the CMIA in 40%, 88%, and 100% of samples collected within 1 week, 1-2 weeks, and 2 weeks after symptom onset in severe and critical cases, and 0%, 38%, and 100% in mild/moderate cases, respectively. In severe and critical cases, the positive IgG detection rate with the IC assay was 60% within one week and 63% between one and two weeks. In mild/moderate cases, the positive IgG rate was 17% within one week and 63% between one and two weeks; IgM was positive in 80% and 75% of severe and critical cases, and 42% and 88% of mild/moderate cases, respectively. On the CMIA, no anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies were detected in COVID-19 outpatients with mild symptoms within 10 days from onset, whereas 50% of samples from severe inpatients were IgG-positive in the same period. The IC assay detected higher IgM positivity earlier from symptom onset in severe and critical cases than in mild/moderate cases.

Conclusions: A serologic anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibody analysis can complement PCR for diagnosing COVID-19 14 days after symptom onset.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0249449PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8023454PMC
April 2021

Validity and Utility of the Questionnaire-based FRAIL Scale in Older Patients with Heart Failure: Findings from the FRAGILE-HF.

J Am Med Dir Assoc 2021 Mar 27. Epub 2021 Mar 27.

Department of Cardiovascular Biology and Medicine, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; Cardiovascular Respiratory Sleep Medicine, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.

Objectives: We investigated whether the FRAIL scale questionnaire is consistent with the Fried criteria, predicts all-cause mortality, and reflects physical dysfunction in patients with heart failure (HF).

Design: Secondary analysis of FRAGILE-HF, a cohort study that enrolled participants from 2016 to 2018 and followed-up for 1-year of discharge.

Setting And Participants: A prospective multicenter cohort study in which 15 hospitals in Japan (8 university hospitals and 7 nonuniversity teaching hospitals) participated. We prospectively enrolled 1332 consecutive hospitalized patients ≥65 years old with HF and analyzed 1028 patients after excluding 304 patients with missing data on the FRAIL scale.

Methods: The FRAIL scale, the Fried model, and physical function were measured before discharge. The endpoint was all-cause mortality.

Results: According to the FRAIL scale, 459 (44.6%) and 491 (47.8%) were classified as frail and prefrail, respectively. The Kappa coefficient between the FRAIL scale and the Fried criteria were 0.39 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.34-0.44; P < .001]. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curves for frailty diagnosed by the Fried criteria of the FRAIL scale was 0.74 (95% CI 0.71-0.76; P < .001). A total of 118 deaths occurred during 1 year of follow-up. After adjusting for the MAGGIC risk score and log-BNP, The FRAIL scale predicted all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 1.17; 95% CI 1.01-1.36; P = .035). The FRAIL scale was also associated with various physical dysfunctions that correlated with poor prognosis.

Conclusions And Implications: The FRAIL scale had moderate consistency with the Fried criteria, predicted all-cause mortality, and reflected clinically important physical dysfunctions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jamda.2021.02.025DOI Listing
March 2021

Effect of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Acute Respiratory Care of Hypoxemic Patients With Acute Heart Failure in Japan - A Cross-Sectional Study.

Circ Rep 2020 Aug 13;2(9):499-506. Epub 2020 Aug 13.

Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University Fukuoka Japan.

The effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on the respiratory management strategy with regard to the use of non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) and high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) in patients with acute heart failure (AHF) in Japan is unclear. This cross-sectional study used a self-reported online questionnaire, with responses from 174 institutions across Japan. More than 60% of institutions responded that the treatment of AHF patients requiring respiratory management became fairly or very difficult during the COVID-19 pandemic than earlier, with institutions in alert areas considering such treatment significantly more difficult than those in non-alert areas (P=0.004). Overall, 61.7% and 58.8% of institutions changed their indications for NPPV and HFNC, respectively. Significantly more institutions in the alert area changed their practices for the use of NPPV and HFNC during the COVID-19 pandemic (P=0.004 and P=0.002, respectively). When there was insufficient time or information to determine whether AHF patients may have concomitant COVID-19, institutions in alert areas were significantly more likely to refrain from using NPPV and HFNC than institutions in non-alert areas. The COVID-19 pandemic has compelled healthcare providers to change the respiratory management of AHF, especially in alert areas.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1253/circrep.CR-20-0081DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7819655PMC
August 2020

Universal Definition and Classification of Heart Failure: A Report of the Heart Failure Society of America, Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology, Japanese Heart Failure Society and Writing Committee of the Universal Definition of Heart Failure.

J Card Fail 2021 Mar 1. Epub 2021 Mar 1.

In this document, we propose a universal definition of heart failure (HF) as the following: HF is a clinical syndrome with symptoms and or signs caused by a structural and/or functional cardiac abnormality and corroborated by elevated natriuretic peptide levels and or objective evidence of pulmonary or systemic congestion. We propose revised stages of HF as follows. At-risk for HF (Stage A), for patients at risk for HF but without current or prior symptoms or signs of HF and without structural or biomarkers evidence of heart disease. Pre-HF (stage B), for patients without current or prior symptoms or signs of HF, but evidence of structural heart disease or abnormal cardiac function, or elevated natriuretic peptide levels. HF (Stage C), for patients with current or prior symptoms and/or signs of HF caused by a structural and/or functional cardiac abnormality. Advanced HF (Stage D), for patients with severe symptoms and/or signs of HF at rest, recurrent hospitalizations despite guideline-directed management and therapy (GDMT), refractory or intolerant to GDMT, requiring advanced therapies such as consideration for transplant, mechanical circulatory support, or palliative care. Finally, we propose a new and revised classification of HF according to left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). The classification includes HF with reduced EF (HFrEF): HF with an LVEF of ≤40%; HF with mildly reduced EF (HFmrEF): HF with an LVEF of 41% to 49%; HF with preserved EF (HFpEF): HF with an LVEF of ≥50%; and HF with improved EF (HFimpEF): HF with a baseline LVEF of ≤40%, a ≥10-point increase from baseline LVEF, and a second measurement of LVEF of >40%.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cardfail.2021.01.022DOI Listing
March 2021

Impact of sarcopenia on prognosis in patients with heart failure with reduced and preserved ejection fraction.

Eur J Prev Cardiol 2020 Nov 22. Epub 2020 Nov 22.

Department of Cardiovascular Biology and Medicine, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.

Aims: Sarcopenia, one of the extracardiac factors for reduced functional capacity and poor outcome in heart failure (HF), may act differently between HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) and HF with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). We sought to investigate the impact of sarcopenia on mortality in HFpEF and HFrEF.

Methods And Results: We performed a post hoc analysis of a multicentre prospective cohort study, including 942 consecutive older (age ≥65 years) hospitalized patients: 475 with HFpEF (ejection fraction ≥45%, age 81 ± 7 years, 48.8% men) and 467 with HFrEF (ejection fraction <45%, age 78 ± 8 years, 68.1% men). Sarcopenia was diagnosed according to the international criteria incorporating muscle strength (handgrip strength), physical performance (gait speed), and skeletal muscle mass (appendicular skeletal mass). The HFpEF group consisted of fewer patients with low appendicular skeletal muscle mass index measured using bioelectrical impedance analysis [<7.0 kg/m2 (men) and <5.7 (women); 22.1% vs. 31.0%, P = 0.003], and more patients with low handgrip strength [<26 kg (men) and <18 (women); 67.8% vs. 55.5%, P < 0.001], and slow gait speed [<0.8 m/s (both sexes); 54.5% vs. 41.1%, P < 0.001] than the HFrEF group, resulting in a similar sarcopenia prevalence in the two groups (18.1% vs. 21.6%, P = 0.191). Sarcopenia was an independent predictor of 1-year mortality in both HFpEF and HFrEF [hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) 2.42 (1.36-4.32), P = 0.003 in HFpEF and 2.02 (1.08-3.75), P = 0.027 in HFrEF; P for interaction = 0.666] after adjustment for other predictors.

Conclusions: In older patients with HF, sarcopenia contributes to mortality similarly in HFpEF and HFrEF.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurjpc/zwaa117DOI Listing
November 2020

Universal definition and classification of heart failure: a report of the Heart Failure Society of America, Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology, Japanese Heart Failure Society and Writing Committee of the Universal Definition of Heart Failure: Endorsed by the Canadian Heart Failure Society, Heart Failure Association of India, Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand, and Chinese Heart Failure Association.

Eur J Heart Fail 2021 Mar 3;23(3):352-380. Epub 2021 Mar 3.

In this document, we propose a universal definition of heart failure (HF) as a clinical syndrome with symptoms and/or signs caused by a structural and/or functional cardiac abnormality and corroborated by elevated natriuretic peptide levels and/or objective evidence of pulmonary or systemic congestion. We also propose revised stages of HF as: At risk for HF (Stage A), Pre-HF (Stage B), Symptomatic HF (Stage C) and Advanced HF (Stage D). Finally, we propose a new and revised classification of HF according to left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). This includes HF with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF): symptomatic HF with LVEF ≤40%; HF with mildly reduced ejection fraction (HFmrEF): symptomatic HF with LVEF 41-49%; HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF): symptomatic HF with LVEF ≥50%; and HF with improved ejection fraction (HFimpEF): symptomatic HF with a baseline LVEF ≤40%, a ≥10 point increase from baseline LVEF, and a second measurement of LVEF > 40%.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ejhf.2115DOI Listing
March 2021

Prevalence and prognostic implications of malnutrition as defined by GLIM criteria in elderly patients with heart failure.

Clin Nutr 2021 Jan 22. Epub 2021 Jan 22.

Department of Cardiovascular Biology and Medicine, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development-Core Research for Evolutionary Medical Science and Technology (AMED-CREST), Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development, Tokyo, Japan.

Background & Aims: Although the Global Leadership Initiative on Malnutrition (GLIM) proposed a consensus scheme for diagnosing malnutrition in adults in clinical settings globally, the prevalence and prognostic value of malnutrition defined by GLIM criteria have yet to be evaluated in elderly patients with heart failure. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and prognostic implication of malnutrition as defined by GLIM criteria in comparison to those for a pre-existing definition of malnutrition, the geriatric nutritional risk index (GNRI), in elderly patients with heart failure METHODS: We evaluated malnutrition by two metrics, the GLIM criteria and geriatric nutritional risk index (GNRI), in 890 hospitalized patients with decompensation of heart failure aged ≥65 years, able to ambulate at discharge. The primary outcome was all-cause death within 1 year of discharge.

Results: According to GLIM criteria and GNRI <92, 42.4% and 46.5% of participants, respectively, had malnutrition, with moderate agreement (Cohen's kappa coefficient: 0.46 [95% confidence interval: 0.40-0.51]). During 1 year of follow-up, 101 (11.4%) deaths were observed, and malnutrition defined by either the GLIM criteria or GNRI was associated with a higher mortality rate, independent of other prognostic factors (GNRI: hazard ratio, 1.45, P = 0.031; GLIM: hazard ratio, 1.57, P = 0.016). Although malnutrition defined by either criterion showed additive prognostic value when added to a model incorporating pre-existing prognostic factors, defining malnutrition by GLIM criteria instead of the GNRI yielded a statistically significant improvement in model prognostic predictive ability (net-reclassification improvement, 0.44, P < 0.001; integrated discrimination index, 0.013, P < 0.001).

Conclusions: In elderly patients with heart failure, 42.4% are malnourished according to the GLIM criteria, which is associated with a poor prognosis, independent of known prognostic factors.

Clinical Trial Registration: University Hospital Medical Information Network (UMIN-CTR, https://www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/index.htm, study unique identifier: UMIN000023929).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clnu.2021.01.014DOI Listing
January 2021

Prevalence and prognostic value of the coexistence of anaemia and frailty in older patients with heart failure.

ESC Heart Fail 2021 Feb 9;8(1):625-633. Epub 2020 Dec 9.

Department of Cardiovascular Biology and Medicine, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.

Aims: There have been no investigations of the prevalence and clinical implications of coexistence of anaemia and frailty in older patients hospitalized with heart failure (HF) despite their association with adverse health outcomes. The present study was performed to determine the prevalence and prognostic value of the coexistence of anaemia and frailty in hospitalized older patients with HF.

Methods And Results: We performed post hoc analysis of consecutive hospitalized HF patients ≥65 years old enrolled in the FRAGILE-HF, which was the prospective, multicentre, observational study. Anaemia was defined as haemoglobin < 13 g/dL in men and <12 g/dL in women, and frailty was evaluated according to the Fried phenotype model. The study endpoint was all-cause mortality. Of the total of 1332 patients, 1217 (median age, 81 years; 57.4% male) were included in the present study. The rates of anaemia and frailty in the study population were 65.7% and 57.0%, respectively. The patients were classified into the non-anaemia/non-frail group (16.6%), anaemia/non-frail group (26.4%), non-anaemia/frail group (17.7%), and anaemia/frail group (39.3%). A total of 144 patients died during 1 year of follow-up. In multivariate analyses, only the anaemia/frail group showed a significant association with elevated mortality rate (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.94; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-3.70; P = 0.043), compared with the non-anaemia/non-frail group after adjusting for other covariates.

Conclusions: Coexistence of anaemia and frailty are prevalent in hospitalized older patients with HF, and it has a negative impact on mortality.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ehf2.13140DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7835564PMC
February 2021

Prognostic value of chest computed tomography in community-acquired pneumonia patients.

ERJ Open Res 2020 Oct 23;6(4). Epub 2020 Nov 23.

Dept of Pulmonary Medicine, Kameda Medical Center, Kamogawa, Japan.

Background: Chest computed tomography (CT) is commonly used to diagnose pneumonia in Japan, but its usability in terms of prognostic predictability is not obvious. We modified CURB-65 (confusion, urea >7 mmol·L, respiratory rate ≥30 breaths·min, blood pressure <90 mmHg (systolic) ≤60 mmHg (diastolic), age ≥65 years) and A-DROP scores with CT information and evaluated their ability to predict mortality in community-acquired pneumonia patients.

Methods: This study was conducted using a prospective registry of the Adult Pneumonia Study Group - Japan. Of the 791 registry patients, 265 hospitalised patients with chest CT were evaluated. Chest CT-modified CURB-65 scores were developed with the first 30 study patients. The 30-day mortality predictability of CT-modified, chest radiography-modified and original CURB-65 scores were validated.

Results: In score development, infiltrates over four lobes and pleural effusion on CT added extra points to CURB-65 scores. The area under the curve for CT-modified CURB-65 scores was significantly higher than that of chest radiography-modified or original CURB-65 scores (both p<0.001). The optimal cut-off CT-modified CURB-65 score was ≥4 (positive-predictive value 80.8%; negative-predictive value 78.6%, for 30-day mortality). For sensitivity analyses, chest CT-modified A-DROP scores also demonstrated better prognostic value than did chest radiography-modified and original A-DROP scores. Poor physical status, chronic heart failure and multiple infiltration hampered chest radiography evaluation.

Conclusion: Chest CT modification of CURB-65 or A-DROP scores improved the prognostic predictability relative to the unmodified scores. In particular, in patients with poor physical status or chronic heart failure, CT findings have a significant advantage. Therefore, CT can be used to enhance prognosis prediction.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1183/23120541.00079-2020DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7680909PMC
October 2020

Changes in self-reported physical activity and health-related quality of life following 3-month astaxanthin supplementation in patients with heart failure: results from a pilot study.

Ann Palliat Med 2021 Feb 10;10(2):1396-1403. Epub 2020 Nov 10.

Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.

Background: Astaxanthin has a strong antioxidant effect. We recently demonstrated that following 3-month astaxanthin supplementation, cardiac contractility and exercise tolerance improved, possibly through the suppression of oxidative stress in a small pilot study involving patients with heart failure with left ventricular systolic dysfunction. This is a sub-study of our pilot study to investigate whether improvements of selfreported physical activity and health-related quality of life were observed following 3-month astaxanthin supplementation.

Methods: We investigated the changes in physical activity by the Specific Activity Scale score and healthrelated quality of life by physical and mental component summary scores in Short Form-8 at baseline and after 3-month astaxanthin supplementation.

Results: Data from 17 patients with heart failure were assessed. Following 3-month astaxanthin supplementation, the Specific Activity Scale score increased from the median of 4.5 (interquartile range, 2.0) to 6.5 (interquartile range, 1.1) metabolic equivalent (P=0.001), and the physical and mental component summary scores increased from 46.1±9.2 to 50.8±6.8 (P=0.015) and from 48.9±9.1 to 53.8±4.8 (P=0.022), respectively. There was a linear relationship of the baseline heart rate, or mental component summary score with the percent change in the Specific Activity Scale score (r=0.523, P=0.031 and r=-0.505, P=0.039, respectively). In addition, there was a direct relationship of ischemic etiology with the percent change in the physical component summary score (r=0.483, P=0.049, respectively). Finally, there was a linear relationship between the percent change in the Specific Activity Scale score and that in the mental component summary score (r=0.595, P=0.012).

Conclusions: Following 3-month astaxanthin supplementation, improvements of the self-reported physical activity level and health-related quality of life in both mental and physical components were observed. In patients with heart failure, those with higher baseline heart rate, ischemic etiology, and poorer baseline health-related quality of life have potentials to have greater improvement of physical activity and/or health-related quality of life.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.21037/apm-20-1378DOI Listing
February 2021

Prognostic Effect of a Novel Simply Calculated Nutritional Index in Acute Decompensated Heart Failure.

Nutrients 2020 Oct 29;12(11). Epub 2020 Oct 29.

Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8421, Japan.

The TCB index (triglycerides × total cholesterol × body weight), a novel simply calculated nutritional index based on serum triglycerides (TGs), serum total cholesterol (TC), and body weight (BW), was recently reported to be a useful prognostic indicator in patients with coronary artery disease. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the relationship between TCBI and long-term mortality in acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) patients. Patients with a diagnosis of ADHF who were consecutively admitted to the cardiac intensive care unit in our institution from 2007 to 2011 were targeted. TCBI was calculated using the formula TG (mg/dL) × TC (mg/dL) × BW (kg)/1000. Patients were divided into two groups according to the median TCBI value. An association between admission TCBI and mortality was assessed using univariable and multivariable Cox proportional hazard analyses. Overall, 417 eligible patients were enrolled, and 94 (22.5%) patients died during a median follow-up period of 2.2 years. The cumulative survival rate with respect to all-cause, cardiovascular, and cancer-related mortalities was worse in patients with low TCBI than in those with high TCBI. In the multivariable analysis, although TCBI was not associated with cardiovascular and cancer mortalities, the association between TCBI and reduced all-cause mortality (hazard ratio: 0.64, 95% confidence interval: 0.44-0.94, = 0.024) was observed. We computed net reclassification improvement (NRI) when TCBI or Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index (GNRI) was added on established predictors such as hemoglobin, serum sodium level, and both. TCBI improved discrimination for all-cause mortality (NRI: 0.42, < 0.001; when added on hemoglobin and serum sodium level). GNRI can improve discrimination for cancer mortality (NRI: 0.96, = 0.002; when added on hemoglobin and serum sodium level). TCBI, a novel and simply calculated nutritional index, can be useful to stratify patients with ADHF who were at risk for worse long-term overall mortality.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu12113311DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7694067PMC
October 2020

Derivation and Validation of Clinical Prediction Models for Rapid Risk Stratification for Time-Sensitive Management for Acute Heart Failure.

J Clin Med 2020 Oct 23;9(11). Epub 2020 Oct 23.

Department of Cardiology, Sakakibara Heart Institute, Tokyo 183-0003, Japan.

Early and rapid risk stratification of patients with acute heart failure (AHF) is crucial for appropriate patient triage and outcome improvements. We aimed to develop an easy-to-use, in-hospital mortality risk prediction tool based on data collected from AHF patients at their initial presentation. Consecutive patients' data pertaining to 2006-2017 were extracted from the West Tokyo Heart Failure (WET-HF) and National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center Acute Decompensated Heart Failure (NaDEF) registries ( = 4351). Risk model development involved stepwise logistic regression analysis and prospective validation using data pertaining to 2014-2015 in the Registry Focused on Very Early Presentation and Treatment in Emergency Department of Acute Heart Failure Syndrome (REALITY-AHF) ( = 1682). The final model included data describing six in-hospital mortality risk predictors, namely, age, systolic blood pressure, blood urea nitrogen, serum sodium, albumin, and natriuretic peptide (SOB-ASAP score), available at the time of initial triage. The model showed excellent discrimination (c-statistic = 0.82) and good agreement between predicted and observed mortality rates. The model enabled the stratification of the mortality rates across sixths (from 14.5% to <1%). When assigned a point for each associated factor, the integer score's discrimination was similar (c-statistic = 0.82) with good calibration across the patients with various risk profiles. The models' performance was retained in the independent validation dataset. Promptly determining in-hospital mortality risks is achievable in the first few hours of presentation; they correlate strongly with mortality among AHF patients, potentially facilitating clinical decision-making.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jcm9113394DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7690673PMC
October 2020

Worsening renal function during intensive blood pressure control: another example of not prognostically relevant creatinine rise?

Eur J Heart Fail 2021 Mar 2;23(3):393-395. Epub 2020 Oct 2.

Department of Cardiovascular Biology and Medicine, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ejhf.2000DOI Listing
March 2021

Cognitive impairment measured by Mini-Cog provides additive prognostic information in elderly patients with heart failure.

J Cardiol 2020 10 3;76(4):350-356. Epub 2020 Jul 3.

Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; Cardiovascular Respiratory Sleep Medicine, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. Electronic address:

Background: There has been no study elucidating whether cognitive impairment (CI) can provide additive prognostic information besides that provided by preexisting prognostic factors in elderly patients with heart failure. This study examined whether CI can provide additive prognostic information in elderly patients with heart failure.

Methods: This multicenter retrospective study included 352 patients with heart failure aged ≥75 years. We administered the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Mini-Cog test to assess CI. The Meta-Analysis Global Group in Chronic Heart Failure (MAGGIC) risk score was used as a model to incorporate the preexisting prognostic factors. All-cause mortality was considered the prognostic outcome.

Results: The median age was 85 years old, 47.7% were male. According to MMSE and Mini-Cog, 167 (47.4%) and 159 (45.2%) patients had CI, respectively. The agreement between MMSE and Mini-Cog was fairly low (Cohen's kappa coefficient 0.37). During the follow-up period of median 346 days, 53 patients (15.1%) died. In multivariate Cox regression analysis, CI defined by MMSE and Mini-cog were individually associated with worse prognosis in older heart failure patients even after adjustment for MAGGIC risk model and log B-type natriuretic peptide levels [CI defined by MMSE, HR: 2.05 (95%CI: 1.16-3.61); and CI defined by Mini-Cog, HR:2.57 (95%CI: 1.46-4.53)]. The area under the curve of receiver operator characteristics curve was numerically greater for Mini-Cog than for MMSE (0.59 vs. 0.52, p = 0.109). Moreover, significant net reclassification improvement was observed when CI defined by Mini-Cog, but not on CI defined by MMSE, was added to the MAGGIC score, and when Mini-Cog, instead of MMSE, was used as a CI assessment tool (0.41, p = 0.004).

Conclusions: Among elderly hospitalized patients with heart failure, CI should be considered as a critical factor for prognosis prediction. Mini-Cog is a potentially preferable tool to assess CI in terms of providing prognostically relevant information compared to MMSE.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jjcc.2020.06.016DOI Listing
October 2020

Impact of brain natriuretic peptide reduction on the worsening renal function in patients with acute heart failure.

PLoS One 2020 26;15(6):e0235493. Epub 2020 Jun 26.

Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital, Kobe, Japan.

Aims: The prognostic impact of worsening renal function (WRF) in patients with acute heart failure (AHF) remains under debate. Successful decongestion might offset the negative impact of WRF, but little is known about indicators of successful decongestion in the very acute phase of AHF. We hypothesized that decongestion as evaluated by the percent reduction in brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) could identify relevant prognostic implications of WRF in the very acute phase of AHF.

Methods And Results: Data on 907 consecutive hospitalized patients with AHF in the REALITY-AHF study (age: 78±12 years; 55.1% male) were analyzed. Creatinine and BNP were measured at baseline and 48 hours from admission. WRF was defined as an increase in creatinine >0.3 mg at 48 hours from admission. The primary endpoint was 1-year all-cause mortality. Patients were divided into four groups according to the presence/absence of WRF and a BNP reduction higher/lower than the median: no-WRF/higher-BNP-reduction (n = 390), no-WRF/lower-BNP-reduction (n = 397), WRF/higher-BNP-reduction (n = 63), and WRF/lower-BNP-reduction groups (n = 57). Kaplan-Meier curve analysis showed that the WRF/lower-BNP-reduction group had a worse prognosis than the other groups. In a Cox regression analysis, only the WRF/lower-BNP-reduction group had higher mortality compared to the no-WRF/higher-BNP-reduction group (hazard ratio: 3.34, p<0.001).

Conclusion: In the very acute phase of AHF, BNP reduction may aid in identifying relevant prognostic significance of WRF.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0235493PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7319326PMC
September 2020

Prevalence and prognostic impact of the coexistence of multiple frailty domains in elderly patients with heart failure: the FRAGILE-HF cohort study.

Eur J Heart Fail 2020 11 14;22(11):2112-2119. Epub 2020 Jul 14.

Department of Cardiology, The Sakakibara Heart Institute of Okayama, Okayama, Japan.

Aims: To describe the prevalence, overlap, and prognostic implications of physical and social frailties and cognitive dysfunction in hospitalized elderly patients with heart failure.

Methods And Results: The FRAGILE-HF study was a prospective multicentre cohort study enrolling consecutive hospitalized patients with heart failure aged ≥65 years. The study objectives were to examine the prevalence, overlap, and prognostic implications of the coexistence of multiple frailty domains. Physical frailty, social frailty, and cognitive dysfunction were evaluated by the Fried phenotype model, Makizako's 5 items, and Mini-Cog, respectively. The primary study outcome was the combined endpoint of heart failure rehospitalization and all-cause death within 1 year. Among 1180 enrolled hospitalized patients (median age, 81 years; 57.4% male), physical frailty, social frailty, and cognitive dysfunction were identified in 56.1%, 66.4%, and 37.1% of the patients, respectively. The number of identified frailty domains was 0, 1, 2, and 3 in 13.5%, 31.4%, 36.9%, and 18.2% of the patients, respectively. During follow-up, the combined endpoint occurred in 383 patients. Adjusted hazard ratios for 1, 2, and 3 domains, with 0 domains as the reference, were 1.38 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.89-2.13; P = 0.15], 1.60 (95% CI 1.04-2.46; P = 0.034), and 2.04 (95% CI 1.28-3.24; P = 0.003), respectively. Incorporating the number of frailty domains into the pre-existing risk model yielded a 22.0% (95% CI 0.087-0.352; P = 0.001) net reclassification improvement for the primary outcome.

Conclusions: The coexistence of multiple frailty domains is prevalent in hospitalized elderly patients with heart failure. Holistic assessment of multi-domain frailty provides additive value to known prognostic factors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ejhf.1926DOI Listing
November 2020

Impact of the Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index on In-Hospital Mortality and Length of Hospitalization in Patients with Acute Decompensated Heart Failure with Preserved or Reduced Ejection Fraction.

J Clin Med 2020 Apr 19;9(4). Epub 2020 Apr 19.

Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421, Japan.

In patients with heart failure (HF), the impact of the Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index (GNRI) on in-hospital mortality and length of hospital stay remains unclear. We aimed to identify the factors associated with increased in-hospital mortality and longer length of hospital stay considering the GNRI in acute decompensated HF with reduced and preserved ejection fraction (HFrEF and HFpEF, respectively). Patients with acute decompensated HF who were admitted to our institution between 2007 and 2011 were investigated. A total of 451 (201, HFrEF; 250, HFpEF) patients were divided into the following: patients with GNRI < 92 and ≥92. In HFrEF, there were no significant differences in in-hospital mortality and length of hospital stay between patients with GNRI < 92 and ≥92 (median (interquartile range), 24.0 (23.8) days and 20.0 (15.0) days, respectively, = 0.32). In HFpEF, despite no differences in in-hospital mortality, patients with GNRI < 92 had significantly longer length of hospital stay than those with GNRI ≥ 92 (median (interquartile range), 20.0 (22.3) days and 17.0 (16.0) days, respectively, = 0.04). In HFpEF, GNRI < 92, along with lower hemoglobin, higher B-type natriuretic peptide, and elevated C-reactive protein levels, were the independent factors for longer length of hospital stay. Among patients with acute decompensated HF, assessment of nutritional status with GNRI is useful for stratifying patients at high risk for longer length of hospital stay in HFpEF but not in HFrEF. These observations are particularly important when considering the increasing elderly population and prevalence of HFpEF.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jcm9041169DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7231029PMC
April 2020

Clinical and Prognostic Values of ALBI Score in Patients With Acute Heart Failure.

Heart Lung Circ 2020 Sep 23;29(9):1328-1337. Epub 2019 Dec 23.

Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital, Kobe, Japan; Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Heart and Vascular Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.

Background: Although liver dysfunction is one of the common complications in patients with acute heart failure (AHF), no integrated marker has been defined. The albumin-bilirubin (ALBI) score has recently been proposed as a novel, clinically-applicable scoring system for liver dysfunction. We investigated the utility of the ALBI score in patients with AHF compared to that for a preexisting liver dysfunction score, the Model of End-Stage Liver Disease Excluding prothrombin time (MELD XI) score.

Methods: We evaluated ALBI and MELD XI scores in 1,190 AHF patients enrolled in the prospective, multicentre Registry Focused on Very Early Presentation and Treatment in Emergency Department of Acute Heart Failure study. The associations between the two scores and the clinical profile and prognostic predictive ability for 1-year mortality were evaluated.

Results: The mean MELD XI and ALBI scores were 13.4±4.8 and -2.25±0.48, respectively. A higher ALBI score, but not higher MELD XI score, was associated with findings of fluid overload. After adjusting for pre-existing prognostic factors, the ALBI score (HR 2.11, 95% CI: 1.60-2.79, p<0.001), but not the MELD XI score (HR 1.02, 95% CI: 0.99-1.06, p=0.242), was associated with 1-year mortality. Likewise, area under the receiver-operator-characteristic curves for 1-year mortality significantly increased when the ALBI score (0.71 vs. 0.74, p=0.020), but not the MELD XI score (0.71 vs. 0.72, p=0.448), was added to the pre-existing risk factors.

Conclusions: The ALBI score is potentially a suitable liver dysfunction marker that incorporates information on fluid overload and prognosis in patients with AHF. These results provide new insights into heart-liver interactions in AHF patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hlc.2019.12.003DOI Listing
September 2020

Tricuspid regurgitation pressure gradient identifies prognostically relevant worsening renal function in acute heart failure.

Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Imaging 2021 Jan;22(2):203-209

Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45, Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519, Japan.

Aims: Not all worsening renal function (WRF) during heart failure treatment is associated with a poor prognosis. However, a metric capable providing a prognosis of relevant WRF has not been developed. Our aim was to evaluate if a change in tricuspid regurgitation pressure gradient (TRPG) could discriminate prognostically relevant and not relevant WRF in patients with acute heart failure (AHF).

Methods And Results: We examined 809 consecutive hospitalized patients with heart failure (78 ± 12 years, 54% male). WRF was defined as an increase in creatinine >0.3 mg and ≥25% from admission to discharge. TRPG was measured at admission and before discharge using echocardiography. The primary outcome was all-cause death within 1-year after discharge. Patients were classified as follows for analysis: no WRF and no TRPG increase (n = 523); no WRF and TRPG increase (no WRF with iTRPG, n = 170); WRF and no TRPG increase (WRF without iTRPG, n = 90); and WRF and TRPG increase (WRF with iTRPG, n = 26). A change in TRPG weakly but significantly correlated to a change in haemoglobin and haematocrit, a percent decrease in brain natriuretic peptide, and body weight reduction during the index period of hospitalization. All-cause mortality within 1 year was higher in patients with WRF and iTRPG, compared to the other three groups (P = 0.026). On Cox regression analysis, only WRF with iTRPG was associated with higher mortality (hazard ratio 4.24, P = 0.001), even after adjustment for other confounders.

Conclusion: An increase in TRPG may provide a marker to identify prognostically relevant WRF in patients with AHF.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ehjci/jeaa035DOI Listing
January 2021

The association of long-term outcome and biological sex in patients with acute heart failure from different geographic regions.

Eur Heart J 2020 04;41(13):1357-1364

Inserm UMR-S 942 MASCOT, Hôpital Lariboisière - Bâtiment Viggo Petersen 41, boulevard de la Chapelle, 75475 Paris Cedex 10, France.

Aims: Recent data from national registries suggest that acute heart failure (AHF) outcomes might vary in men and women, however, it is not known whether this observation is universal. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of biological sex and 1-year all-cause mortality in patients with AHF in various regions of the world.

Methods And Results: We analysed several AHF cohorts including GREAT registry (22 523 patients, mostly from Europe and Asia) and OPTIMIZE-HF (26 376 patients from the USA). Clinical characteristics and medication use at discharge were collected. Hazard ratios (HRs) for 1-year mortality according to biological sex were calculated using a Cox proportional hazards regression model with adjustment for baseline characteristics (e.g. age, comorbidities, clinical and laboratory parameters at admission, left ventricular ejection fraction). In the GREAT registry, women had a lower risk of death in the year following AHF [HR 0.86 (0.79-0.94), P < 0.001 after adjustment]. This was mostly driven by northeast Asia [n = 9135, HR 0.76 (0.67-0.87), P < 0.001], while no significant differences were seen in other countries. In the OPTIMIZE-HF registry, women also had a lower risk of 1-year death [HR 0.93 (0.89-0.97), P < 0.001]. In the GREAT registry, women were less often prescribed with a combination of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta-blockers at discharge (50% vs. 57%, P = 0.001).

Conclusion: Globally women with AHF have a lower 1-year mortality and less evidenced-based treatment than men. Differences among countries need further investigation. Our findings merit consideration when designing future global clinical trials in AHF.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurheartj/ehaa071DOI Listing
April 2020

Intraoperative Intravenous and Intra-Articular Plus Postoperative Intravenous Tranexamic Acid in Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Placebo-Controlled Randomized Controlled Trial.

J Bone Joint Surg Am 2020 Apr;102(8):687-692

Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Juntendo University, Tokyo, Japan.

Background: Combined intraoperative intravenous and intra-articular tranexamic acid (TXA) is 1 of the most effective administration routes to decrease the amount of perioperative blood loss during total knee arthroplasty (TKA). However, the additive effect of postoperative intravenous TXA administration remains unclear. We hypothesized that the postoperative repeated-dose intravenous administration of TXA would provide lower perioperative blood loss.

Methods: We performed a double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial involving patients undergoing primary TKA. A total of 100 patients who were managed with combined intraoperative intravenous and intra-articular TXA were randomly assigned to receive 3 postoperative 1,000-mg doses of intravenous TXA (TXA group) or 3 postoperative doses of intravenous normal saline solution (placebo group) in a 1:1 ratio. The prespecified primary outcome was perioperative blood loss calculated from patient blood volume and the difference in hemoglobin from preoperatively to postoperative day 3. A post hoc power analysis showed that the number of patients allocated to either the TXA group (n = 46) or the placebo group (n = 54) possessed >80% power to detect a 200-mL difference in perioperative blood loss.

Results: In the intention-to-treat analysis, we found no significant differences in perioperative blood loss between the TXA group and the placebo group through postoperative day 3 (578 ± 229 compared with 640 ± 276 mL, respectively; 95% confidence interval for the difference, -40 to 163 mL; p = 0.23). The prevalence of postoperative thrombotic events did not differ between the 2 groups (4.3% compared with 3.7%, respectively; p > 0.99).

Conclusions: Postoperative intravenous TXA had no additive effect in reducing perioperative blood loss in patients receiving intraoperative combined intravenous and intra-articular TXA.

Level Of Evidence: Therapeutic Level I. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2106/JBJS.19.01083DOI Listing
April 2020

Validation of the Larissa Heart Failure Risk Score for risk stratification in acute heart failure.

Int J Cardiol 2020 05 28;307:119-124. Epub 2019 Dec 28.

Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.

Background: The LHFRS is a simple score derived from three factors (history of hypertension, history of coronary artery disease/myocardial infarction, and red blood cell distribution width) deployed for the risk stratification of AHF in Greek population. This study aimed to validate the Larissa Heart Failure Risk Score (LHFRS) in patients with acute heart failure (AHF) in a Japanese population.

Methods: We performed post-hoc analysis of 1670 consecutive patients enrolled in the REALITY-AHF. In all, 964 patients were finally enrolled. Exclusion criteria included patients with anemia, malignancies and sepsis. The primary outcome was defined as a composite of all-cause mortality and/or heart failure readmission, and the secondary outcome was defined as all-cause mortality.

Results: The median admission LHFRS value was 1 (interquartile range [IQR]: 0-2). During a median follow-up of 365 (IQR: 161-365) days, the primary and secondary outcomes were observed in 321 and 157 patients, respectively. LHFRS was an independent predictor of both the primary (adjusted hazard ratio per 1-point increase, 95% confidence interval: 1.17 [1.04-1.32], p = 0.011), and the secondary outcomes (1.31 [1.12-1.55], p = 0.001). Patients with higher LHFRS scores (≥2) exhibited significantly worse outcomes than those with lower scores (<2) both for the primary outcome (1.40 [1.07-1.83], p = 0.014) and the secondary outcome (1.60 [1.09-2.34], p = 0.015). Additionally, LHFRS revealed an excellent goodness of fit (observed versus predicted outcomes) for predicting both the primary and the secondary outcomes (p > 0.99 and p = 0.99, respectively).

Conclusion: The simple LHFRS was proved as a reliable predictor of outcomes in patients with AHF.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijcard.2019.12.051DOI Listing
May 2020

Are Obese Patients With Heart Failure Very Different From Non-Obese Patients?

Authors:
Yuya Matsue

J Card Fail 2020 02 24;26(2):118-119. Epub 2019 Dec 24.

Cardiovascular Respiratory Sleep Medicine, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Juntendo University, Tokyo, Japan. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cardfail.2019.12.003DOI Listing
February 2020