Publications by authors named "Yuta Nemoto"

20 Publications

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[Effect of an exercise program targeting knee pain on medical costs of elderly community-dwelling adults].

Nihon Koshu Eisei Zasshi 2021 Mar 5. Epub 2021 Mar 5.

Physical Fitness Research Institute, Meiji Yasuda Life Foundation of Health and Welfare.

Objectives The aim of this study was to examine the effect of an exercise program targeting knee pain on longitudinal medical costs (MC) of elderly community-dwelling adults.Methods A community-based health program using specific exercises for improving knee pain was held from January to February, 2015. Twenty-eight individuals participated in the program (intervention group) and seventy individuals were selected from the respondents of a health and lifestyle survey by matching age, sex, and baseline value of severity of knee pain as a control group. Twenty individuals from the intervention group and twenty-nine from the control group were included in the final analysis. The changes in MC from 2014 to 2018 were compared between the two groups using a linear mixed-effects model.Results The effect of the program on MC, estimated as a change from the baseline in 2014, showed a reduction of -5.6×10 yen/person (95% CI: -39.2-28.0) for the entire four-year period after the intervention. However, this difference was not significant. The changes in MC each year after the intervention were 9.3×10 yen/person (95% CI: -39.6-58.3) in 2015, -2.0×10 yen/person (95% CI: -44.4-40.5) in 2016, -10.3×10 yen/person (95% CI: -42.5-21.9) in 2017, and 8.2×10 yen/person (95% CI: -39.1-55.4) in 2018.Conclusion The exercise program did not show a clear benefit in reducing the MC of elderly community-dwellers during the four years after the intervention. Further research with longer study durations and larger sample populations would be necessary to determine the effect of such intervention programs on MC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.11236/jph.20-087DOI Listing
March 2021

Who is mentally healthy? Mental health profiles of Japanese social networking service users with a focus on LINE, Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

PLoS One 2021 3;16(3):e0246090. Epub 2021 Mar 3.

Research Team for Social Participation and Community Health, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Tokyo, Japan.

Background: Both negative and positive associations between social networking service (SNS) usage and mental health have been suggested by previous studies; however, their differences by type of SNS and age remain unclear. We addressed this issue based on the frequency of traditional communication such as face-to-face and non-face-to-face communication (e.g., phone, email, and letters).

Methods: In total, 8,576 individuals participated, including 2,543 aged 18-39, 3,048 aged 40-64, and 2,985 aged over 65 years. They were asked to indicate their frequency of SNS usage, both for posting and checking, of LINE (a popular message application in Japan), Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, with frequent usage defined as posting or checking more than a few times a week. To determine mental health status, WHO-5 (i.e., well-being), K6 (i.e., distress symptoms), and feelings of loneliness were assessed. Multiple and logistic regression analyses were adjusted for the frequency of traditional communication. To avoid type 1 error, a Bonferroni correction of p ≤ 0.002 was applied in the regression models (p = 0.05/18, a number of regression models).

Results: The most frequently used SNS across the three age groups was LINE; frequent usage (both posting and checking) among older adults was independently associated with better well-being. Frequent posting on Facebook was associated with better well-being in middle-aged adults. Young adults who frequently checked on Instagram showed a tendency toward better well-being and lower distress symptoms. On the contrary, frequent usage of Twitter was associated with distress symptoms or feelings of loneliness across all three age groups.

Conclusions: We found generational and SNS-type-dependent negative and positive associations between SNS use and mental health, indicating the possible influences of SNS use and the importance of non-SNS communication.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0246090PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7928453PMC
March 2021

Social Contact with Family and Non-Family Members Differentially Affects Physical Activity: A Parallel Latent Growth Curve Modeling Approach.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2021 02 26;18(5). Epub 2021 Feb 26.

Research Team for Social Participation and Community Health, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Tokyo 173-0015, Japan.

Background: Social contact leads to an increased likelihood of engaging in physical activity (PA). However, the influence of social contact on PA would be different depending on the social contact source. This study aimed to identify the association of changes in social contact with family and non-family members with the change in PA using a parallel latent growth curve modeling.

Methods: Participants were randomly selected from among residents in the study area age ≥ 20 years ( = 7000). We conducted mail surveys in 2014, 2016, and 2019. The 1365 participants completed all surveys. PA was assessed with validated single-item physical activity measure. Social contact was assessed by summing frequencies of face-to-face and non-face-to-face contacts with family/relatives not living with the participant and friends/neighbors. Parallel latent growth curve modeling was used to assess the cross-sectional, prospective, and parallel associations of social contact with PA change.

Results: There was a positive cross-sectional association between contact with friends/neighbors and PA, whereas prospective and parallel associations between contact with family/relatives and PA.

Conclusion: Contacting friends/neighbors did not predict the change in PA, and a high frequency of contact with family/relatives at baseline and increasing contact with family/relatives was associated with increased PA over 5-year.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18052313DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7956539PMC
February 2021

Longitudinal associations of social group engagement with physical activity among Japanese older adults.

Arch Gerontol Geriatr 2021 Jan - Feb;92:104259. Epub 2020 Sep 30.

Meiji Yasuda Life Foundation of Health and Welfare, 150 Tobuki, Hachiōji, Tokyo, 192-0001, Japan.

Background: Although social group engagement (SGE) has been suggested to affect physical activity (PA) in older age, the longitudinal relationship between these variables is unclear. This study used 2-year panel data to investigate the link between changes in SGE and changes in PA among community-dwelling older adults.

Methods: This study was a 2-year community-based longitudinal study enrolling older adults living in a rural municipality in Japan. The subjects were all residents in the study area aged ≥ 65 at the baseline. Mail surveys were administered in 2016 and 2018. The 3688 subjects responding to both surveys were included in the analyses. PA was evaluated with the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, and weekly time and metabolic equivalent were computed. SGE was assessed in each wave and classified as consistent engagement (engagement reported in both surveys), new engagement (non-engagement at baseline and engagement at follow-up), leaving the group (engagement at baseline and non-engagement at follow-up), and consistent non-engagement (non-engagement in both surveys). Analysis of covariance was performed to examine the associations of changes in SGE with changes in PA.

Results: Compared with those with consistent non-engagement, who showed declines in every PA category, subjects with consistent engagement or new engagement showed significantly smaller changes in total PA, moderate-intensity PA, and brisk walking. Leaving the group (vs. consistent non-engagement) was associated with maintaining moderate-intensity PA.

Conclusions: SGE helps to suppress the age-associated decline in PA in older age, with new engagement and continuous engagement, especially, mitigating decreasing PA.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.archger.2020.104259DOI Listing
February 2021

[School students' greeting behavior and its association with their community attachment and helping behavior].

Nihon Koshu Eisei Zasshi 2020 ;67(7):452-460

Research Team for Social Participation and Community Health, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology.

Objectives Many local governments and elementary and junior high schools in Japan have conducted a "greeting campaign". This has been done in order to activate communication among local residents, and to instill public spirit and sociability in students' minds. However, few studies have explored the significance of greeting campaigns. The present study investigates greeting in neighborhoods and its relationship with students' spontaneous greeting behavior. The study also seeks to understand the quantity of greeting in daily life and its association with a student's community attachment and helping behavior.Methods A self-completion questionnaire survey was conducted with 1,346 students studying in the fourth and higher grades at elementary schools, and 1,357 students in the first and second grade at junior high schools. There were 2,692 valid respondents. We performed the following analyses using the data of elementary school students and junior high school students separately. A partial correlation analysis was conducted wherein gender and grade were introduced as control variables. This analysis tested the correlation between the frequency of being greeted by surrounding people and the frequency of greeting by students, of their own accord. A path analysis that tested the relationship between students' greeting behavior, their attachment to residential areas, and helping behavior was also conducted.Results The results of the partial correlation analysis revealed that there was a positive correlation between the frequency of being greeted by surrounding people and the frequency of greeting by students, of their own accord, regardless of gender and grade. Moreover, the results of the path analysis revealed that the frequency of being greeted was positively associated with community attachment and that the frequency of students' spontaneous greeting behavior was positively associated not only with community attachment but also with helping behavior. The goodness of model fit was high for both the data of elementary school students as well as the data of junior high school students.Conclusion We found that exchanging greetings with surrounding people in daily life enhanced students' attachment to the community. In particular, we showed that students' spontaneous greeting behavior led to their helping behavior, which supports the significance of recommending greeting at home, school, or in the local community. Since there was a correlation between the frequency of being greeted and the frequency of greeting willingly, we consider that actions of surrounding adults become important to help students acquire spontaneous greeting behavior.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.11236/jph.67.7_452DOI Listing
September 2020

Working for only financial reasons attenuates the health effects of working beyond retirement age: A 2-year longitudinal study.

Geriatr Gerontol Int 2020 Aug 3;20(8):745-751. Epub 2020 Jul 3.

Research Team for Social Participation and Community Health, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Itabashi, Japan.

Aim: The health benefits of paid employment in late life are understood, but they might vary according to work motives. We examined the health effects of employment among older adults, focusing on motivation.

Methods: We carried out a 2-year longitudinal survey from 2013 (baseline) to 2015 (follow up). Among 7608 older adults, the analysis included 1069 who completed both surveys and were employed at baseline. Work motives were assessed using a questionnaire. Participants were assigned to groups based on their responses: (i) financial reasons; (ii) motivation other than financial reasons; and (iii) both financial and non-financial reasons. Self-rated health, mental health and higher-level functional capacity were evaluated as health outcomes.

Results: There were group differences in baseline demographic variables and health status; those with financial reasons had lower socioeconomic status and worse mental health. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that compared with older workers with non-financial reasons, those with financial reasons were more likely to decline in self-rated health (OR 1.42; 95% CI 1.00-2.03) and higher-level functional capacity (OR 1.55; 95% CI 1.16-2.07), which was independent of potential covariates, including socioeconomic status. However, no differences were evident between those with only non-financial reasons and those having both financial and non-financial reasons.

Conclusions: We found that the participants who worked only for financial rewards had reduced health benefits through working in old age. A prolonged working life among older workers can contribute to maintaining health and can be enhanced by non-financial reasons, such as finding meaning in life and social contact. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2020; 20: 745-751.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ggi.13941DOI Listing
August 2020

[The relationship between intra- and inter-generational exchange and mental health among young and older adults].

Nihon Koshu Eisei Zasshi 2018 ;65(12):719-729

Research Team for Social Participation and Community Health, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology.

Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between intra- and inter-generational exchange and mental health among young adults aged 25-49 years and older adults aged 65-84 years.Methods In 2016, a community-based, cross-sectional survey was conducted. A total of 3,334 young adults (valid response rate: 24.6%), and 3,116 older adults (valid response rate: 46.0%) completed the survey and were included in the analysis. Their mental health was evaluated using the World Health Organization-Five Well-Being Index (WHO-5), and those who scored under 13 or scored less than one on any item were considered to have poor mental health. To evaluate the intra- or inter-generational exchange, participants were asked about their frequency of interaction with people aged 20-49 years or aged ≥70, excluding family and co-workers. Young adults who interacted with people aged 20-49 years or older adults who interacted with people ≥70 were classified as "having intra-generational exchange," while young adults who interacted with people ≥70 years or older adults who interacted with people aged 20-49 years were classified as "having intergenerational exchange." Therefore, individuals who interacted with both generations were classified as "having multi-generational exchange," and those who did not interact with any generation were categorized as "no exchange." We conducted a logistic regression analysis that included mental health as a dependent variable, intra- and inter-generational exchange as independent variables, and gender, age, educational attainment, marital status, living situation, subjective economic status, social participation, employment, self-rated health, and Instrumental Activity of Daily Living as covariates.Results Of the 3,334 young adults, 61.5% were mentally healthy, 51.3% had intra-generational exchange, 21.9% had inter-generational exchange, 16.5% had multi-generational exchange, and 42.7% did not have any exchange. Of the 3,116 older adults, 65.8% were mentally healthy, 67.9% had intra-generational exchange, 34.3% had inter-generational exchange, 29.9% had multi-generational exchange, and 21.1% did not have any exchange. A logistic regression analysis revealed that "having intra-generational exchange" and "having intergenerational exchange" were significantly related to better mental health in both young adults (intra-generational; Odds ratios (OR) 1.19, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 1.10-1.30: inter-generational; OR 1.13, 95% CI 1.03-1.25) and older adults (intra-generational; OR 1.15, 95% CI 1.02-1.29: inter-generational; OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.30-1.65). Therefore, "having multi-generational exchange" was more strongly related to better mental health compared with "only having intra-generational exchange."Conclusion Among young and older adults, intra- and inter-generational exchange were related to better mental health, and multi-generational exchange showed the strongest relationship with better mental health.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.11236/jph.65.12_719DOI Listing
January 2019

[Community Child-Rearing Support Scale: Applicability across generations and differences in the supportive behaviors among generations].

Nihon Koshu Eisei Zasshi 2018 ;65(7):321-333

Research Team for Social Participation and Community Health, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology.

Objectives Using the Community Child-Rearing Support Scale (CCRSS), which was developed for older adults, we examined 1) the reliability and validity of the scale for multiple generations, as well as the generational differences in the 2) degree and content of supportive behaviors for child rearing and 3) correlates of the behavior, in conjunction with gender differences.Methods A mail survey was conducted with residents aged 25-84 years who were randomly selected from two cities in Tokyo and the surrounding areas, and responses were obtained from 8918 residents (response rate: 33%). The respondents were grouped as follows: old-aged (65-84 years), middle-aged (50-64 years), and young-aged (25-49 years). We performed the following analyses by age group and gender: 1) Cronbach's reliability coefficient and a confirmatory factor analysis of the CCRSS, 2) analysis of variance of the total CCRSS scores and scores of the three subscales ("children's security and sound growth," "instrumental support to parents," and "emotional support to parents"), and 3) a multiple regression analysis of the total scores in which various individual characteristics were introduced as explanatory variables.Results The reliability coefficient was over 0.85 for each age group, and the factor analysis showed good model fitness. Compared to the middle- and young-aged groups, the old-aged group was more likely to provide support for "children's security and sound growth," and equally (for women) or more likely (for men) to provide "emotional support to parents," thereby resulting in the highest total score among the three generations. The mean score of "instrumental support to parents," such as taking care of a child, was the highest for young women, although the score was low overall. Having a child or grandchild under 13 years old and stronger generativity were positively associated with child-rearing support for all age groups; however, the degree of associations varied across the groups. While having a child was strongly associated with support among the young-aged group, the association between support and generativity was stronger for older groups. Moreover, participation in neighborhood associations or volunteer groups and high school or lower education were associated with more support among all age groups, whereas living in rental apartments was associated with less support among the young-aged group.Conclusion Our findings suggest that the CCRSS can be used for multiple generations and that old people play an important role in child rearing in the community. We found both differences and similarities between generations with respect to the correlates of child-rearing support.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.11236/jph.65.7_321DOI Listing
November 2018

Factors that promote new or continuous participation in social group activity among Japanese community-dwelling older adults: A 2-year longitudinal study.

Geriatr Gerontol Int 2018 Aug 12;18(8):1259-1266. Epub 2018 Jul 12.

Research Team for Social Participation and Community Health, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Tokyo, Japan.

Aim: Identifying factors that influence participation in social group activities in older adults might be helpful in promoting social participation in this population. We examined factors related to new or continuous participation in social group activities according to group type.

Methods: We carried out a community-based, longitudinal study with a 2-year follow-up period. Of 7608 older adults aged ≥65 years, 3380 completed the follow-up survey and were included in the analysis. We examined private group (hobbies, sports and volunteering; PrG) and public group (neighborhood associations and senior citizen clubs; PuG) activity.

Results: For PrG, 39.6% of the participants were engaged at baseline, 25.5% initiated participation and 9.5% withdrew during the study period. For PuG, 20.8% of the participants were engaged at baseline, 10.8% initiated participation and 31.5% withdrew during the study period. Logistic regression analysis showed mental health, self-rated health, employment, relationships with neighbors, subjective economic status, educational attainment and participation in PuG were related to new participation in PrG. Mental health, employment and relationships with neighbors were significantly related to continuous participation. For PuG, mental health, sex and relationships with neighbors were significantly related to new participation, whereas sex, relationships with neighbors and educational attainment were related to continuous participation.

Conclusions: The rate of new and continuous participation in PrG was higher than that in PuG, and different related factors were identified as existing between social group types. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2018; 18: 1259-1266.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ggi.13457DOI Listing
August 2018

The association of single and combined factors of sedentary behavior and physical activity with subjective cognitive complaints among community-dwelling older adults: Cross-sectional study.

PLoS One 2018 16;13(4):e0195384. Epub 2018 Apr 16.

Faculty of Sport Sciences, Waseda University, Saitama, Japan.

Subjective cognitive complaints (SCC) might be a meaningful indicator of dementia onset or mild cognitive impairment, and identifying the related factors of SCC could contribute to preventing these diseases. However, the relationship between SCC and lifestyle factors remains largely unproven. The purpose of this study was to examine the association of type of sedentary behavior, physical activity, or their combination with SCC among community-dwelling older adults. In 2016, 6677 community-living elderly were recruited to participate in a survey investigating cognition, physical activity, and sedentary behavior. In total, 5328 participants responded to the questionnaire (79.8% valid response rate). SCC was assessed using the National Functional Survey Questionnaire (Kihon checklist). The relationships between SCC and physical activity, sedentary behavior (reading books or newspapers, and television viewing), or combined physical activity and sedentary behavior were examined via multiple logistic regression analysis. The analysis revealed that moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (≥150 min/week) was significantly related with a lower risk of SCC (odds ratio [OR] = 0.85; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.74-0.97), and that reading behavior showed a dose-response relationship with SCC (OR for 10-20 min/day = 0.63; 95% CI = 0.53-0.75; OR for 20-30 min/day = 0.59; 95% CI = 0.49-0.71; OR for ≥30 min/day = 0.47; 95% CI = 0.39-0.57). In addition, among those reporting high physical activity and ≥30 min/day for reading time, the OR for SCC was 0.40 (95% CI = 0.32-0.50) compared with the combined group reporting lower physical activity and non-readers. The present study shows that increased physical activity and reading time may be related to a reduced risk for SCC among community-dwelling older adults.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0195384PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5901918PMC
July 2018

An additive effect of leading role in the organization between social participation and dementia onset among Japanese older adults: the AGES cohort study.

BMC Geriatr 2017 12 29;17(1):297. Epub 2017 Dec 29.

Center for Preventive Medical Sciences, Chiba University, Chiba, Japan.

Background: Several previous studies reported social participation may reduce the incident of dementia; therefore, the type of positions held in the organization may relate to dementia onset. However, this hypothesis remains largely unknown. The purpose of the present study was to examine the additive effect of a leadership position in the organization on dementia onset and social participation among elderly people in a local community, according to data from a Japanese older adults cohort study.

Methods: Of 29,374 community-dwelling elderly, a total of 15,313 subjects responded to the baseline survey and were followed-up from November 2003 to March 2013. To evaluate the association between dementia onset and social participation as well as the role in the organization, we conducted Cox proportional hazard regression analysis with multiple imputation by age group (aged 75 years older or younger). The dependent variable was dementia onset, which was obtained from long-term care insurance data in Japan; independent variables were social participation and the role in the organization to which they belonged (head, manager, or treasurer). Covariates were sex, age, educational level, marriage status, job status, residence status, alcohol consumption, smoking status, and walking time, instrumental activities of daily living, depression, and medical history.

Results: During the follow-up period, 708 young-old elderly people (7.7%) and 1289 old-old elderly people (27.9%) developed dementia. In young-old elderly, relative to social non-participants, adjusted Hazard Ratio (HR) for dementia onset for participants (regular members + leadership positions) was 0.75 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.64-0.88). Relative to regular members, adjusted HR for dementia onset for non-participants was 1.22 (95% CI, 1.02-1.46), for leadership positions 0.81 (95% CI, 0.65-0.99). The results for old-old elderly participants did not show that any significantly adjusted HR between dementia onset and social participation, the role in the organization.

Conclusions: In young-old elderly people, social participation might have a positive effect on dementia onset, and holding leadership positions in organization could lead to a decrease in risk of dementia onset by almost 20% than regular members.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12877-017-0688-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5747184PMC
December 2017

The prevalence and basic characteristics of knee pain in community-dwelling independent elderly: A complete survey.

Nihon Koshu Eisei Zasshi 2017 ;64(6):322-329

Faculty of Sport Sciences, Waseda University.

Objectives The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of knee pain in independent community-dwelling elderly people and to examine the basic characteristics (sex and age) of those experiencing knee pain.Methods Survey on the health status and lifestyle habits was conducted for all (6,790) independent elderly who were 65 years or older, living in Tsuru City, Yamanashi Prefecture, Japan. The survey was carried out using a mailing questionnaire for 1 month from January 12 to February 11, 2016. Knee pain was defined as subjective pain in and around the knee joint in either one or both knees, on most days during the past month. Participants answered "Yes" if they were experienced knee pain, and "No" if they did not experience knee pain. Sex and age were investigated as basic characteristics of the participants by the questionnaire. The prevalence rate of knee pain was calculated as follows: the total number of people with knee pain divided by the total number of the respondents in the study. To examine the relationships between knee pain and age or sex, these basic characteristics were analyzed using a Chi-square test for the prevalence of knee pain within sex and age groups.Results The number of survey respondents was 5,328 (response rate: 78.5%). The number of valid respondents with complete data was 5,186 (valid response rate: 76.4%). The number of subjects who responded "with knee pain" was 1,733. The prevalence rate of knee pain was 33.4%. In addition, sex and age demonstrated strong associations with the prevalence of knee pain (both, P<0.001). In other words, the prevalence rate was higher in the elderly women than in elderly men and increased with age.Conclusion The present study suggested that one in three independently living elderly who live in medium-sized local municipalities in Japan experience chronic knee pain. The basic characteristics of a community-dwelling independent elderly with knee pain are to be a woman and older age.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.11236/jph.64.6_322DOI Listing
May 2018

A cross-sectional study on the factors related to cognitive decline in community-dwelling elderly.

Nihon Ronen Igakkai Zasshi 2017 ;54(2):143-153

Faculty of Sport Sciences, Waseda University.

Aim: The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between cognitive decline and physical activity, sitting time, and social participation among elderly people living independently in a local community.

Methods: In January 2015, 1,133 independently-living elderly individuals from a local Japanese community completed self-administrated questionnaires. A total of 929 participants completed the questionnaire (valid response rate: 82.0%). A multiple logistic regression analysis was conducted to examine the relationship between cognitive decline, physical activity, sitting time, and social participation. The factors related to cognitive decline were examined using three statistical models: (1) Model 1 was not adjusted for any factors; (2) Model 2 was adjusted for age, education level, smoking status, and drinking status; and (3) Model 3 was adjusted for the covariates in Model 2, plus depression.

Results: Cognitive decline was observed in 33% of men and 26% of women. The results indicated that decreased social participation was significantly related to cognitive decline in Models 1 and 2. For men, local community activity and political/economic activity were significantly associated with cognitive decline in Models 1 and 2. Among women, physical activity was significantly related to cognitive decline in Model 1. There was also a significant association between social participation and cognitive decline in Models 1 and 2; decreased volunteer activity was significantly related to cognitive decline in all three models.

Conclusion: The results of the present study indicated that attending volunteer activities was significantly related to cognitive decline in women.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3143/geriatrics.54.143DOI Listing
May 2018

Errata: The relevant factors for knee pain in community-dwelling elderly: A cross-sectional study.

Nihon Koshu Eisei Zasshi 2017 ;64(1):51

Nihon Koshu Eisei Zasshi(JAPANESE JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH), Vol. 63 (2016) No. 9 p. 560-568: p563(Tables 1, 2).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.11236/jph.64.1_51DOI Listing
July 2017

The relevant factors for knee pain in community-dwelling elderly: A cross-sectional study.

Nihon Koshu Eisei Zasshi 2016 ;63(9):560-568

Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Human Arts and Sciences.

Objective To clarify the comprehensive relevant factors for knee pain in elderly men and women independently living in the community.Methods A health and lifestyle survey was conducted using 1,133 independent living elderly participants from a district in local community. Demographics, health status, lifestyle, knee pain, and physical activity were measured. Knee pain was evaluated based on whether the individual had reported experiencing pain when he or she was walking at the ground level during the last two weeks. The International Physical Activity Questionnaire Short Version assessed physical activity and sitting time. With regards to physical activity, subjects were classified into two groups -"non-sufficiency" or "sufficiency"- based on the recommendation by the World Health Organization of 150 minutes per week. With regards to sitting time, subjects were classified into two groups -"long time" or "short time"- based on a median value of 5 hours of sitting time per week. The demographic variables evaluated were age, sex, education, and marital status. Health status was evaluated by measuring the individual's Body mass index (BMI) and by their current disease history. Lifestyle was evaluated based on the individual's dietary habits, alcohol consumption, and smoking status. Each variable was classified into two groups. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to examine the association of knee pain with physical activity, sitting time, dietary habits, drinking, smoking, and BMI in men and women. All variables were entered simultaneously as independent variables. The models were adjusted for sex, age, education, marital status, and health status.Results The number of valid respondents for the analysis was 801 (response rate: 70.7%), including 365 men (74.9±6.9 years) and 436 women (74.9±6.9 years). Survey responses for men and women who had reported experiencing knee pain suggested that, only physical activity was significantly associated with knee pain in men (P=0.035). The odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidential interval (95% CI) for knee pain were 0.605 and 0.308-0.964, respectively. In women, BMI and dietary habits were significant relevant factors for knee pain (P=0.023 and P=0.004, respectively). The OR for BMI and dietary habits were 0.595 and 0.547, respectively while the 95% CI were (0.380-0.931) and (0.364-0.823), respectively.Conclusion The results of this study suggest that physical activity was a related factor for knee pain in men. In contrast, BMI and dietary habits were relevant factors for knee pain in women.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.11236/jph.63.9_560DOI Listing
February 2018

Small gastrointestinal stromal tumor in the stomach: identification of precursor for clinical gastrointestinal stromal tumor using c-kit and α-smooth muscle actin expression.

Hum Pathol 2013 Dec 10;44(12):2628-35. Epub 2013 Oct 10.

Department of Pathology, Toho University School of Medicine, Ota-ku, Tokyo 143-8540, Japan; Department of Pathology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-0374, Japan. Electronic address:

Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the digestive tract. To find precursors for clinical GISTs of the stomach, small gastric stromal tumors of less than 3 cm were collected and examined immunohistochemically with analysis of the KIT mutation. Sixty-eight of 74 lesions were classified into 4 representative groups according to the expression of c-kit and α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA): group A, c-kit diffusely positive and αSMA negative (18 cases); group B, c-kit diffusely positive and αSMA focally positive (13); group C, c-kit focally positive and αSMA diffusely positive (27); and group D, c-kit negative and αSMA diffusely positive (10). Of the 4 groups, groups A and B of c-kit diffuse expression showed higher cellularity and labeling indices of p27(Kip1) and Ki-67 than did groups C and D of diffuse αSMA expression. Incidence of KIT exon 11 mutation in groups A and B was 86% (25/29), whereas that in groups C and D was 0% (0/20). Small gastric stromal tumors with c-kit diffuse expression were considered precursors for clinical GIST because they were significantly different from c-kit focally positive or negative tumors. The mutation of KIT is considered as an early event in tumorigenesis of GIST.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.humpath.2013.07.020DOI Listing
December 2013

Primary and secondary adenocarcinomas associated with anal fistulae.

Surg Today 2014 May 31;44(5):888-96. Epub 2013 May 31.

Utsunomiya Coloproctology Clinic, 1-1-7 Daikan-cho, Utsunomiya, Tochigi, 320-0867, Japan.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical features, pathology, and etiology of adenocarcinoma in patients with anal fistulae.

Methods: We identified seven patients diagnosed with adenocarcinoma associated with anal fistulae from a retrospective chart review.

Results: Five patients were diagnosed with primary adenocarcinoma associated with anal fistulae. Two patients were diagnosed with secondary adenocarcinoma associated with anal fistulae originating from rectal cancer on the proximal side. The primary adenocarcinomas included cancers arising from long-standing anal fistulae fulfilling established diagnostic criteria in two patients, and cancer arising from short-duration anal fistulae in three patients. Excision of the fistula was performed based on the initial diagnosis of the anal fistula for all five patients. Increased suspicion of cancer was due to the existence of gelatinous material in the anal fistula in three patients and induration in the resected specimens in two patients. The etiologies of the secondary adenocarcinomas associated with anal fistulae included implantation in the anal fistula from rectal cancer and fistula formation originating due to the progression of rectal cancer.

Conclusion: Anal fistulae are commonly seen in the coloproctology clinic, but special attention to similar conditions associated with malignant disease is needed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00595-013-0629-yDOI Listing
May 2014

Neuroprotection by tosyl-polyamine derivatives through the inhibition of ionotropic glutamate receptors.

J Pharmacol Exp Ther 2009 Nov 30;331(2):522-30. Epub 2009 Jul 30.

College of Pharmacy, Nihon University, Funabashi, Chiba, Japan.

Tosyl-polyamine derivatives such as N-{4-[4-(guanidinobutylamino)-butylamino]butyl}-4-methylbenzenesulfonamide trihydrochroride (TsHSPMG) have been found to strongly inhibit macroscopic currents through heteromeric N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors (NR1/NR2A, NR1/NR2B) and Ca(2+)-permeable alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (homomeric glutamate receptor 1) receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes on voltage-clamp recording. In the present study, it was found that the inhibition of NMDA receptor activity induced by tosyl-polyamine derivatives was voltage-dependent. Some mutations located in the intracellular region of the channel pore, such as NR1 E621Q and NR2B W607L, reduced the inhibition by tosyl-polyamine derivatives, suggesting that tosyl-polyamine derivatives penetrate deeply into the channel pore of NMDA receptors. The neuroprotective effects of tosyl-polyamine derivatives against cell injury caused by NMDA were investigated in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Addition of 1 microM TsHSPMG to medium ablated the neurotoxicity induced by NMDA, and a similar effect was observed with 30 microM memantine. The neuroprotective effects of tosyl-polyamine derivatives on NMDA-induced seizures in mice were also assayed. Intracerebroventricular or intravenous injection of TsHSPMG (0.1 or 0.5 mg/kg) decreased the seizures induced by intraperitoneal injection of NMDA in mice. These findings indicate that tosyl-polyamine derivatives exhibit neuroprotective effects not only in primary cultured neurons but also in mice.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1124/jpet.109.152926DOI Listing
November 2009

Cleft-type cyclophanes confer neuroprotection against excitatory neurotoxicity in vitro and in vivo through inhibition of NMDA receptors.

Neuropharmacology 2007 Sep 29;53(4):515-23. Epub 2007 Jun 29.

College of Pharmacy, Nihon University, 7-7-1 Narashinodai, Funabashi-shi, Chiba 274-8555, Japan.

The cleft-type cyclophanes (ACCn, DNCn and TsDCn) were found to strongly inhibit macroscopic currents at heteromeric NMDA receptors (NR1/NR2) but not AMPA receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes at voltage-clamp recording. The inhibition by cleft-type cyclophanes was voltage-dependent, because the inhibition was larger at -100 mV than at -20 mV. Mutations at NR1 N650, located in the vestibule of the channel pore, reduced the inhibition by DNCn and TsDCn, suggesting that the residue (N650) interacts with these cleft-type cyclophanes. Cell toxicity of TsDCn on SH-SY5Y cells was slightly weaker than that of memantine. The neuroprotective effects of cleft-type cyclophanes against cell damage caused by NMDA were investigated in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Addition of 10 microM DNCn or TsDCn into the medium ablated the neurotoxicity induced by NMDA, and a similar effect was also observed with memantine. The neuroprotective effects of cleft-type cyclophanes were then assayed on NMDA-induced seizures in mice. Intracerebroventricular injection of TsDCn (5 mg/mouse) decreased the seizure induced by intraperitoneal injection of NMDA (115 mg/kg) in mice. The results demonstrate that these cleft-type cyclophanes interact directly with the extracellular mouth of the NMDA channel pore and exhibit neuroprotective effects on NMDA-induced excitatory toxicity in primary cultured neurons and mice.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropharm.2007.06.013DOI Listing
September 2007

Correlation of enhanced cell turnover with prognosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumors of the stomach: relevance of cellularity and p27kip1.

Pathol Int 2006 Dec;56(12):724-31

Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, Kitasato University, Sagamihara, Japan.

The aim of the present study was to determine whether expression of molecules associated with cell cycle regulation and apoptosis might reflect tumor grade and patients' prognosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). Forty-nine cases of gastric GIST were divided into three grades; low, intermediate, and high risk. Ki-67, cyclin A, cyclin D1, cyclin E, p16(Ink4), p21(Waf1), p27(Kip1), cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk)2, cdk4 and single-strand DNA (ssDNA) were immunohistochemically stained and assessed. Ki-67, ssDNA, cyclin A and cdk2 had higher labeling indices (LI) in high-risk than in low-risk cases. Cyclin E expression was greater in the intermediate- than in the low-risk grade. On Kaplan-Meier analysis, tumor size, necrosis, cellularity, Ki-67, ssDNA, and cyclin A LI were significantly correlated with disease-free survival. Necrosis, cellularity, and Ki-67 LI were significant as prognostic factors on univariate, and Ki-67 LI on multivariate Cox hazard tests. Within the high-risk grade, high cellularity and low p27(Kip1) subgroups had the worst prognosis. The histological grade is related to cell turnover, assessed in terms of Ki-67, ssDNA, cyclin A, cyclin E, and cdk2 levels. Ki-67, ssDNA, and cyclin A are useful for prediction of prognosis, with cellularity and p27(Kip1) expression as further prognostic factors in high-risk cases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1440-1827.2006.02038.xDOI Listing
December 2006