Publications by authors named "Yuri Dowa"

13 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion; posterior frontal hyperperfusion before late seizures revealed by arterial spin labeling: A case report.

Brain Dev 2021 Jun 2;43(6):714-718. Epub 2021 Mar 2.

Department of Neurology, Gunma Children's Medical Center, 779 Shimohakoda, Hokkitsu-machi, Shibukawa, Gunma 377-8577, Japan.

Background: Arterial spin labeling, a magnetic resonance imaging modality that can evaluate cerebral perfusion without using a contrast material or ionizing radiation, is becoming increasingly accessible. However, only a few reports have used this method to assess the perfusion abnormalities observed in acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion.

Patient Description: A 10-month-old Japanese girl presented with febrile status epilepticus (early seizures). Her convulsions ceased after the administration of intravenous phenobarbital, although her impaired consciousness was protracted. Five days later, diffusion-weighted imaging revealed slightly high signal intensity lesions in the bilateral posterior frontal areas. Arterial spin labeling revealed bilateral frontal-dominant hypoperfusion and posterior frontal hyperperfusion. On day 6, she had three convulsions (late seizures) and was diagnosed with acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion. She received treatment accordingly and recovered eventually.

Discussion: Based on previous reports, hypoperfusion within 1-2 days of early seizures and hyperperfusion accompanied by bright tree appearance on diffusion-weighted imaging within 1-2 days of late seizures are typical in acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion. In our patient, the first magnetic resonance imaging scan was performed one day prior to the onset of late seizures. We observed posterior frontal hyperperfusion accompanied by high signals on diffusion-weighted imaging, which leads us to speculate that this could be a predictive marker of late seizures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.braindev.2021.02.001DOI Listing
June 2021

Pyridoxal in the Cerebrospinal Fluid May Be a Better Indicator of Vitamin B6-dependent Epilepsy Than Pyridoxal 5'-Phosphate.

Pediatr Neurol 2020 12 2;113:33-41. Epub 2020 Sep 2.

Department of Child Neurology, Okayama University Hospital, Okayama, Japan; Department of Child Neurology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama, Japan.

Background: We aimed to demonstrate the biochemical characteristics of vitamin B6-dependent epilepsy, with a particular focus on pyridoxal 5'-phosphate and pyridoxal in the cerebrospinal fluid.

Methods: Using our laboratory database, we identified patients with vitamin B6-dependent epilepsy and extracted their data on the concentrations of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, pyridoxal, pipecolic acid, α-aminoadipic semialdehyde, and monoamine neurotransmitters. We compared the biochemical characteristics of these patients with those of other epilepsy patients with low pyridoxal 5'-phosphate concentrations.

Results: We identified seven patients with pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy caused by an ALDH7A1 gene abnormality, two patients with pyridoxal 5'-phosphate homeostasis protein deficiency, and 28 patients with other epilepsies with low cerebrospinal fluid pyridoxal 5'-phosphate concentrations. Cerebrospinal fluid pyridoxal and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate concentrations were low in patients with vitamin B6-dependent epilepsy but cerebrospinal fluid pyridoxal concentrations were not reduced in most patients with other epilepsies with low cerebrospinal fluid pyridoxal 5'-phosphate concentrations. Increase in 3-O-methyldopa and 5-hydroxytryptophan was demonstrated in some patients with vitamin B6-dependent epilepsy, suggestive of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate deficiency in the brain.

Conclusions: Low cerebrospinal fluid pyridoxal concentrations may be a better indicator of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate deficiency in the brain in vitamin B6-dependent epilepsy than low cerebrospinal fluid pyridoxal 5'-phosphate concentrations. This finding is especially helpful in individuals with suspected pyridoxal 5'-phosphate homeostasis protein deficiency, which does not have known biomarkers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pediatrneurol.2020.08.020DOI Listing
December 2020

Multiple cerebral cysts are another possible feature of Jacobsen syndrome.

Brain Dev 2020 09 17;42(8):626. Epub 2020 Jul 17.

Department of Neurology, Gunma Children's Medical Center, Gunma, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.braindev.2020.06.019DOI Listing
September 2020

A case of pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy with novel mutations.

Oxf Med Case Reports 2020 Mar 6;2020(3):omaa008. Epub 2020 May 6.

Department of Neurology, Gunma Children's Medical Centre, Shibukawa, Gunma, Japan.

Pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy (PDE) is a rare autosomal-recessive disorder typically presenting with neonatal seizures and is sometimes difficult to diagnose, because the clinical features mimic those of birth asphyxia. A Japanese newborn boy presented with pulmonary haemorrhage and convulsions on the day of birth. Brain computed tomography showed diffuse, but mild, low-density cerebral white matter and a thin subdural hematoma in the posterior fossa. He did not have thrombocytopenia or coagulopathy. His respiratory status improved with conservative treatment, but his convulsions were persistent even after prescription of several antiepileptic drugs. His serum and cerebrospinal fluid showed decreased vitamin B6 vitamers and increased upstream metabolites of α-aminoadipic semialdehyde dehydrogenase, strongly suggesting a diagnosis of PDE; the epileptic spasms ceased after administration of intravenous pyridoxal phosphate hydrate. Gene analysis revealed novel compound heterozygous mutations in that included NM_001182.4:[c.1196G > T] and [c.1200 + 1G > A]. Atypical birth asphyxia with persistent neonatal seizure should prompt vitamin B6/metabolite screening.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/omcr/omaa008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7202051PMC
March 2020

Sweet Potato Was Not So Sweet: Undetected Foreign-body Aspiration in a Healthy Child Leading to Acute Bronchial Asthma.

Tokai J Exp Clin Med 2019 Apr 20;44(1):1-4. Epub 2019 Apr 20.

Department of Neurology, Gunma Children's Medical Center, 779 Shimohakoda, Hokkitsu, Shibukawa, Gunma 377-8577, Japan.

Introduction: Sweet potato may contain furanoterpenoids, including ipomeamarone, which cause lung edema.

Case Presentation: A 10-year-old schoolgirl was hospitalized with asthma exacerbation and acute pneumonia. Chest radiographs showed a diffuse opacity of the left lung and hyperpermeability of the right lung. Computed tomography indicated foreign-body aspiration. Flexible bronchoscopy revealed an inhaled piece of sweet potato obstructing the left main bronchus. Although the patient's dyspnea worsened after removal of the sweet potato, she recovered with the treatment based on the 2014 Japanese Childhood Asthma Guidelines.

Conclusion: Cases of sweet potato aspiration need careful treatment after removal of the foreign body.
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April 2019

Rhinovirus-associated acute encephalitis/encephalopathy and cerebellitis.

Brain Dev 2019 Jun 6;41(6):551-554. Epub 2019 Mar 6.

Department of Neurology, Gunma Children's Medical Center, 779 Shimohakoda, Hokkitsu-machi, Shibukawa, Gunma 377-8577, Japan.

Background: Rhinovirus is a common respiratory pathogen for children throughout the year; nevertheless, its central nervous system involvement is extremely rare, and only two cases have been reported to date: meningitis and sepsis-like illness.

Patient: A previously healthy 2-year-old Japanese boy developed fever, followed by seizures and lethargy. His cerebrospinal fluid cell count and protein level were slightly increased; brain magnetic resonance imaging showed abnormal intensities in the bilateral cerebellar dentate nuclei, which were prominent in diffusion-weighted images. After his consciousness disturbance improved, cerebellar dysfunction became apparent. He was treated symptomatically, without steroids or any other immunosuppressants. He almost recovered within a few months; however, cerebellar atrophy became evident on brain magnetic resonance imaging. Using acute specimens, human rhinovirus A was detected in his throat swab and cerebrospinal fluid.

Discussion: Acute cerebellitis, in which cerebellar inflammation is predominant, is occasionally accompanied by cerebral symptoms, such as consciousness disturbance and seizures. As a causative pathogen, rotavirus is the most common; however, rhinovirus-associated acute encephalitis/encephalopathy and concurrent cerebellitis have not been reported before. Further research, using recent molecular techniques to detect various central nervous system pathogens, including rhinovirus, is needed to delineate the underlying pathophysiology.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.braindev.2019.02.014DOI Listing
June 2019

Two siblings with 11qter deletion syndrome that had been rescued in their mother by uniparental disomy.

Eur J Med Genet 2019 Mar 18;62(3):224-228. Epub 2018 Jul 18.

Division of Molecular Genetics, Institute for Comprehensive Medical Science, Fujita Health University, Toyoake, Japan; Center for Collaboration in Research and Education, Fujita Health University, Toyoake, Japan; Genome and Transcriptome Analysis Center, Fujita Health University, Toyoake, Japan. Electronic address:

Jacobsen syndrome refers to a congenital anomaly caused by deletion at 11q23.3-qter. We here describe two siblings with the same 11q23.3-qter deletion. Both parents were healthy with a normal karyotype. Cytogenetic microarray analysis revealed no mosaicism in either parent but the mother showed uniparental disomy encompassing the deleted region found in the two siblings. The pattern of X chromosome inactivation was almost completely skewed in the mother. These data suggested that the mother was a carrier of the 11q23.3-qter deletion but that this had been rescued by disomy formation during early embryogenesis except for her germinal cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejmg.2018.07.018DOI Listing
March 2019

A case of mumps-related acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion.

Brain Dev 2017 Oct 10;39(9):808-810. Epub 2017 May 10.

Department of Neurology, Gunma Children's Medical Center, 779 Shimohakoda, Hokkitsu-machi, Shibukawa, Gunma 377-8577, Japan.

Background: Mumps is a common childhood viral disease characterized by fever and swelling of the parotid gland. The prognosis is generally good, although some complications, such as encephalitis (0.1%), exist. Acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion is the most common type of acute encephalopathy. However, this type of encephalopathy has not been reported in association with mumps infection.

Patient: A previously healthy 3-year-old Japanese boy had a brief convulsion after fever for 3days, and then had conscious disturbance and parotitis. After several days, he had a second brief convulsion and was admitted. Increased serum amylase levels and presence of anti-mumps immunoglobulin M antibody confirmed mumps parotitis. The patient had another brief seizure later the day of admission. He did not have status or cluster seizures, although the biphasic nature of his seizures, conscious disturbance between the seizures, no pleocytosis in cerebrospinal fluid, and brain magnetic resonance images were consistent with acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion.

Discussion: In Japan, the mumps vaccine is not administered as a part of routine immunizations. It thus has low coverage (30-40%), and as a result, mumps infections are still common. However, this is the first case of mumps-related acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion. This case may be representative of only a minority of patients with mumps-associated central nervous system involvement. Nevertheless, this diagnostic possibility may be considered. In order to prevent mumps-related complications, routine mumps vaccination might be warranted.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.braindev.2017.04.012DOI Listing
October 2017

Screening for secondary hyperparathyroidism in preterm infants.

Pediatr Int 2016 Oct 8;58(10):988-992. Epub 2016 Jun 8.

Department of Pediatrics, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan.

Background: The major cause of osteopathy of prematurity is dietary phosphate deficiency, but secondary hyperparathyroidism caused by calcium deficiency or vitamin D deficiency is also important. Because parathyroid hormone (PTH) mobilizes calcium and phosphate from the bone, hyperparathyroidism worsens osteopathy of prematurity. In order to identify useful markers to screen for and diagnose hyperparathyroidism in preterm infants, we measured serum and urinary biochemical markers.

Methods: Several biomarkers, including serum intact PTH (iPTH), were measured in urine and serum samples obtained from 95 preterm infants, and the relationship between serum iPTH and the other parameters was analyzed.

Results: Mean gestation was 33.2 ± 2.9 weeks, and mean birthweight was 1705 ± 402 g. Samples were collected around postnatal day 17.3 ± 7.4. Fourteen infants (14.7%) had iPTH >65 pg/mL. Cut-offs for serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and percent tubular reabsorption rate of phosphate (%TRP) were fixed at 1300 IU/L and 93%, respectively using receiver operating characteristic curves with iPTH cut-off of 65 pg/mL. Serum ALP was proven to be a good marker: ALP had a sensitivity of 78.6% and a specificity of 86.4%, while %TRP itself was not: %TRP had a sensitivity of 64.3% and a specificity of 58.0%. Combined measurement of serum ALP (>1300 IU/L) and %TRP (≤93%), however, had a specificity of 93.8% for detecting elevated iPTH.

Conclusion: Measurement of serum ALP (>1300 IU/L) is considered as an effective screening method to detect hyperparathyroidism. In addition, combined assessment of ALP(>1300 IU/L) and %TRP(≤93%) is a good indicator of elevated iPTH in preterm infants.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ped.12961DOI Listing
October 2016

Detailed analysis of 26 cases of 1q partial duplication/triplication syndrome.

Am J Med Genet A 2016 Apr 18;170A(4):908-17. Epub 2016 Jan 18.

Department of Pediatrics, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki, Japan.

Partial 1q trisomy syndrome is a rare disorder. Because unbalanced chromosomal translocations often occur with 1q trisomy, it is difficult to determine whether patient symptoms are related to 1q trisomy or other chromosomal abnormalities. The present study evaluated genotype-phenotype correlations of 26 cases diagnosed with 1q partial trisomy syndrome. DNA microarray was used to investigate the duplication/triplication region of 16 cases. Although there was no overlapping region common to all 26 cases, the 1q41-qter region was frequently involved. One case diagnosed as a pure interstitial trisomy of chromosome 1q by G-banded karyotype analysis was instead found to be a pure partial tetrasomy by CytoScan HD Array. In four 1q trisomy syndrome cases involving translocation, the translocated partner chromosome could not be detected by DNA microarray analyzes despite G-banded karyotype analysis, because there were a limited number of probes available for the partner region. DNA microarray and G-banded karyotyping techniques were therefore shown to be compensatory diagnostic tools that should be used by clinicians who suspect chromosomal abnormalities. It is important to continue recruiting affected patients and observe and monitor their symptoms to reveal genotype-phenotype correlations and to fully understand their prognosis and identify causal regions of symptoms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.37496DOI Listing
April 2016

Obtaining subjects' consent to publish identifying personal information: current practices and identifying potential issues.

BMC Med Ethics 2013 Nov 25;14:47. Epub 2013 Nov 25.

Department of Medical Ethics/Medical Genetics, Kyoto University School of Public Health, Yoshida-Konoe-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan.

Background: In studies publishing identifying personal information, obtaining consent is regarded as necessary, as it is impossible to ensure complete anonymity. However, current journal practices around specific points to consider when obtaining consent, the contents of consent forms and how consent forms are managed have not yet been fully examined. This study was conducted to identify potential issues surrounding consent to publish identifying personal information.

Methods: Content analysis was carried out on instructions for authors and consent forms developed by academic journals in four fields (as classified by Journal Citation Reports): medicine general and internal, genetics and heredity, pediatrics, and psychiatry. An online questionnaire survey of editors working for journals that require the submission of consent forms was also conducted.

Results: Instructions for authors were reviewed for 491 academic journals (132 for medicine general and internal, 147 for genetics and heredity, 100 for pediatrics, and 112 for psychiatry). Approximately 40% (203: 74 for medicine general and internal, 31 for genetics and heredity, 58 for pediatrics, and 40 for psychiatry) stated that subject consent was necessary. The submission of consent forms was required by 30% (154) of the journals studied, and 10% (50) provided their own consent forms for authors to use. Two journals mentioned that the possible effects of publication on subjects should be considered. Many journal consent forms mentioned the difficulties in ensuring complete anonymity of subjects, but few addressed the study objective, the subjects' right to refuse consent and the withdrawal of consent. The main reason for requiring the submission of consent forms was to confirm that consent had been obtained.

Conclusion: Approximately 40% of journals required subject consent to be obtained. However, differences were observed depending on the fields. Specific considerations were not always documented. There is a need to address issues around the study objective, subjects' right to refuse consent and the withdrawal of consent. Whether responsibility for ensuring that the consent form has been signed lies with publishers also needs to be discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1472-6939-14-47DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4222768PMC
November 2013

Tetralogy of Fallot associated with pulmonary atresia and major aortopulmonary collateral arteries in a patient with interstitial deletion of 16q21-q22.1.

Am J Med Genet A 2008 Jun;146A(12):1575-80

International Research and Educational Institute for Integrated Medical Sciences, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Tokyo, Japan.

A newborn male had an interstitial deletion of 16q21-q22.1 accompanying tetralogy of Fallot associated with pulmonary atresia and major aortopulmonary collateral arteries (MAPCA), dysmorphic craniofacial features, failure to thrive, and severe psychomotor developmental delay. When the deletion in this patient and other reported patients are compared, the 16q22 region appears to be the smallest region for 16q deletion syndrome. Since over 50% of patients with the deletion of 16q22 region have congenital heart disease, there may be a responsible gene in this region.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.32204DOI Listing
June 2008

Congenital neuroblastoma in a patient with partial trisomy of 2p.

J Pediatr Hematol Oncol 2006 Jun;28(6):379-82

Department of Medical Genetics, Kanagawa Children's Medical Center, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama, Japan.

We report the fourth example of a patient with germline partial trisomy of 2p21-pter and congenital neuroblastoma. The male infant had a dysmorphic facial expression and presented with congenital heart disease, supernumerary nipples, hypospadias, shawl scrotum, hemilateral persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous, and neuroblastoma. His germline karyotype of 46,XY,der(8)t(2;8)(p21;p23.2) was inherited from a maternal-balanced translocation, which indicates that the proto-oncogene MYCN region of 2p24.3 is tripicated in germline cells. A cytogenetic study of the biopsied tumor cells did not show MYCN amplification, but the DNA index was 2.4 and histologic fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis indicated somatic mutation with near-pentaploidy of the tumor cells. This could be an alternative mechanism of MYCN activation in the process of the tumorigenesis of neuroblastoma.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/00043426-200606000-00011DOI Listing
June 2006