Publications by authors named "Yuraporn Sahasakul"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Impact of Drying Processes on Phenolics and In Vitro Health-Related Activities of Indigenous Plants in Thailand.

Plants (Basel) 2022 Jan 22;11(3). Epub 2022 Jan 22.

Institute of Nutrition, Mahidol University, Salaya, Phuttamonthon, Nakhon Pathom 73170, Thailand.

Thailand has vast areas of tropical forests with many indigenous plants, but limited information is available on their phytochemical profile and in vitro inhibitions of enzymatic and nonenzymatic reactions. This study investigated phenolic profiles using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS), antioxidant activities, and in vitro inhibitory activities of 10 indigenous plants on key enzymes related to obesity (lipase), diabetes (α-amylase and α-glucosidase), and Alzheimer's disease (cholinesterases and β-secretase). The nonenzymatic anti-glycation reaction was also investigated. The 10 indigenous plants were (L.) Benth, (Burm.) Roscoe, Roxb., (Retz.) Swartz, Wall., Kurz., , L., Roxb, and J. Mood & T. Theleide. Preparations were made by either freeze-drying or oven-drying processes. Results suggested that the drying processes had a minor impact on in vitro inhibitions of enzymatic and nonenzymatic reactions (<4-fold difference). was the most potent antioxidant provider with high anti-glycation activity (>80% inhibition using the extract concentration of ≤6 mg/mL), while effectively inhibited β-secretase activity (>80% inhibition using the extract concentration of 10 mg/mL). exhibited the highest inhibitory activities against lipase (47-51% inhibition using the extract concentration of 1 mg/mL) and cholinesterases (>60% inhibition using the extract concentration of 2 mg/mL), while dominantly provided α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibitors (>80% inhibition using the extract concentration of ≤2 mg/mL). Information obtained from this research may support usage of the oven-drying method due to its lower cost and easier preparation step for these studied plant species and plant parts. Furthermore, the information on in vitro inhibitions of enzymatic and nonenzymatic reactions could be used as fundamental knowledge for further investigations into other biological activities such as cell culture or in vivo experiments of these health-beneficial plants.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/plants11030294DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8838347PMC
January 2022

Influence of Plant Origins and Seasonal Variations on Nutritive Values, Phenolics and Antioxidant Activities of Craib., an Endangered Species from Thailand.

Foods 2021 Nov 14;10(11). Epub 2021 Nov 14.

Institute of Nutrition, Mahidol University, Salaya, Phuttamonthon, Nakhon Pathom 73170, Thailand.

Craib. is an indigenous plant found in Thailand, Cambodia and Vietnam that has become threatened owing to lack of knowledge about its agricultural management. This plant is now rare in the wild and was registered in the Plant Genetic Conservation Project under the initiation of Her Royal Highness Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn (RSPG) to promote sustainable conservation and optimally beneficial utilization. has a long history of utilization as a nutrient-rich source with medicinal properties but scientific evidence of the veracity of these claims is limited. Here, the nutritional compositions, phenolic contents and antioxidant activities of different plant parts (young shoots and old leaves) of were investigated using plants collected from four areas of Thailand as Kamphaeng Phet (KP), Muang Nakhon Ratchasima (MN), Pakchong Nakhon Ratchasima (PN) and Uthai Thani (UT) at different harvesting periods (March-April, May-June and July-August). Results indicated that young shoots provided higher energy, protein, fat, dietary fiber, phosphorus, sodium, and zinc than old leaves. By contrast, nutrients such as total sugar, vitamin C, carotenoids, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and iron contents were higher in old leaves that also exhibited higher phenolic contents and most antioxidant activities than young shoots. Generally, most nutrients, phenolic contents, and antioxidant activities exhibited no clear trend among different plant origins. The harvesting period of July-August provided a suitable climate for biosynthesis of most nutrients, while high phenolics were mainly found in samples harvested in March-April. No clear trend was observed in the prevalence of antioxidant activities that varied according to assay techniques.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/foods10112799DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8623237PMC
November 2021

A Comparison of the Nutritional and Biochemical Quality of Date Palm Fruits Obtained Using Different Planting Techniques.

Molecules 2021 Apr 13;26(8). Epub 2021 Apr 13.

Institute of Nutrition, Mahidol University, Salaya, Phuttamonthon, Nakhon Pathom 73170, Thailand.

Date palm fruit ( L.) is commonly consumed around the world and has recently become an economical crop in Eastern Thailand, especially the Barhi cultivar that can be consumed as fresh fruit. To maintain genetic qualities, date palm is populated through cell culture. This leads to high production costs, while access to this technique is limited. Increasing date palm population by simple seed planting is currently of interest as an alternative for local farmers. Nevertheless, information on nutritive values, bioactive compounds, and health-promoting bioactivities of seed originating from date palm fruit is unavailable. Effects of different planting origins (cell culture origin (CO) and seed origin (SO)) of date palm fruits at the Khalal stage of Barhi cultivar were investigated for nutritive values, bioactive compounds, and in vitro health-promoting properties via key enzyme inhibitions against obesity (lipase), diabetes (α-amylase, α-glucosidase, and dipeptidyl peptidase-IV), Alzheimer's disease (cholinesterases and β-secretase), and hypertension (angiotensin-converting enzyme). Waste seeds as a by-product from date palm production were also examined regarding these properties to increase seed marketing opportunities for future food applications and other health-related products. CO and SO exhibited insignificant differences in energy, fat, and carbohydrate contents. SO had higher protein, dietary fiber, vitamin A, vitamin E, and calcium contents than CO, while CO contained higher contents of fructose, glucose and maltose. Higher phenolic contents in SO led to greater enzyme inhibitory activities than CO. Interestingly, seeds of date palm fruits mostly contained higher nutritive values than the flesh. No carotenoids were detected in seeds but higher phenolic contents resulted in greater enzyme inhibitory activities than recorded for fruit flesh. Results suggest that appropriate planting of date palm can support the development of novel date palm fruit products, leading to expansion of economic opportunities and investment in date palm fruit agriculture.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/molecules26082245DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8069938PMC
April 2021

The Effect of Steaming and Fermentation on Nutritive Values, Antioxidant Activities, and Inhibitory Properties of Tea Leaves.

Foods 2021 Jan 8;10(1). Epub 2021 Jan 8.

Institute of Nutrition, Mahidol University, Salaya, Phuttamonthon, Nakhon Pathom 73170, Thailand.

Fermented tea (Cha-miang in Thai) is a local product made by traditional food preservation processes in Northern Thailand that involve steaming fresh tea leaves followed by fermenting in the dark. Information on changes in nutritive values, bioactive compounds, antioxidant activities, and health properties that occur during the steaming and fermenting processes of tea leaves is, however, limited. Changes in nutritive values, phenolics, antioxidant activities, and in vitro health properties through inhibition of key enzymes that control obesity (lipase), diabetes (α-amylase and α-glucosidase), hypertension (angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)), and Alzheimer's disease (cholinesterases (ChEs) and β-secretase (BACE-1)) of fermented tea were compared to the corresponding fresh and steamed tea leaves. Results showed that energy, carbohydrate, and vitamin B1 increased after steaming, while most nutrients including protein, dietary fiber, vitamins (B2, B3, and C), and minerals (Na, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, and Zn) decreased after the steaming process. After fermentation, energy, fat, sodium, potassium, and iron contents increased, while calcium and vitamins (B1, B2, B3, and C) decreased compared to steamed tea leaves. However, the contents of vitamin B1 and iron were insignificantly different between fresh and fermented tea leaves. Five flavonoids (quercetin, kaempferol, cyanidin, myricetin, and apigenin) and three phenolic acids (gallic acid, caffeic acid, and -coumaric acid) were identified in the tea samples. Total phenolic content (TPC) and antioxidant activities increased significantly after steaming and fermentation, suggesting structural changes in bioactive compounds during these processes. Steamed tea exhibited high inhibition against lipase, α-amylase, and α-glucosidase, while fermented tea possessed high anti-ChE and anti-ACE activities. Fresh tea exhibited high BACE-1 inhibitory activity. Results suggest that tea preparations (steaming and fermentation) play a significant role in the amounts of nutrients and bioactive compounds, which, in turn, affect the in vitro health properties. Knowledge gained from this research will support future investigations on in vivo health properties of fermented tea, as well as promote future food development of fermented tea as a healthy food.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/foods10010117DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7827290PMC
January 2021

Brown rice and retrograded brown rice alleviate inflammatory response in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis mice.

Food Funct 2017 Dec;8(12):4630-4643

Institute of Nutrition, Mahidol University, Nakhonpathom, Thailand.

The present study was aimed to investigate the impacts of brown rice (BR) and retrograded brown rice (R-BR) consumption on colonic health and gut microbiota in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) induced colitis mice. Thirty two female C57Bl/6Mlac mice were fed with modified AIN 93G diets by replacing cornstarch in the original composition with white rice (WR), BR and R-BR powder. The mice were divided into 4 groups and fed with the following experimental diets for 4 weeks: (1) negative control (WR: diet with WR), (2) positive control (DSS_WR: DSS and diet with WR), (3) DSS_BR: DSS and diet with BR, and (4) DSS_R-BR: DSS and diet with R-BR. BR and R-BR had a greater content of fat, dietary fiber, GABA, γ-oryzanol, γ-tocotrienol, ferulic acid and p-coumaric acid than WR (p < 0.05). No significant difference in the level of these bioactive compounds was noted between BR and R-BR. Nevertheless, R-BR had a 1.8 fold resistant starch (RS) content of BR (p < 0.05). The DSS_BR and DSS_R-BR groups showed a lower ratio of colonic weight to length, and a lower content of iNOS, COX-2, MPO, IL-6 and INF-γ in colonic homogenates than the DSS_WR group. However, the DSS treated mice fed with the R-BR diet had significantly milder histopathological inflammatory injury and lower colonic iNOS expression than the DSS_BR and DSS_WR groups. The percentage of mesenteric regulatory T cells significantly increased in the DSS_R-BR group compared to that in the DSS_WR group. The DSS treated mice fed with the R-BR diet showed a significant increase in cecal bacterial diversity and abundance of genera Prevotella, Ruminococcus, Dorea, Coprococcus and Dehalobacterium but a significant decrease in pathogenic bacteria including Bacteroides and Enterococcus compared to the DSS_WR group. Thus, the present data indicate that BR and R-BR ameliorate colonic inflammation in experimental colitis induced by DSS in mice by suppressing inflammatory mediators and modulating regulatory T cell responses as well as bacterial diversity in the cecum.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c7fo00305fDOI Listing
December 2017

Gastric emptying is involved in Lactobacillus colonisation in mouse stomach.

Br J Nutr 2014 Aug 16;112(3):408-15. Epub 2014 Jun 16.

Laboratory of Food Biochemistry, Research Faculty of Agriculture, Hokkaido University,Kita-9, Nishi-9, Kita-ku,Sapporo060-8589,Japan.

Lactobacilli are indigenous microbes of the stomach of rodents, with much lower numbers being present in mice fed a purified diet than in those fed a non-purified diet. We postulated that gastric emptying (GE) is responsible for the different colonisation levels of lactobacilli and tested this hypothesis in the present study. BALB/cCr Slc mice were fed either a non-purified diet or a purified diet for 2 weeks. The number of gastric tissue-associated lactobacilli was lower in mice fed the purified diet than in those fed the non-purified diet. GE, estimated by measuring the food recovered from the stomach, was higher in mice fed the purified diet than in those fed the non-purified diet and correlated negatively with the number of lactobacilli. Mice fed the non-purified diet exhibited lower GE rates even when lactobacilli were eliminated by ampicillin administration through the drinking-water, suggesting that GE is the cause but not the consequence of different Lactobacillus colonisation levels. The plasma concentrations of acylated ghrelin, a gastric hormone that promotes GE, were higher in mice fed the purified diet than in those fed the non-purified diet. There was a negative correlation between GE and the number of lactobacilli in mice fed the non-purified diet, the purified diet, and the purified diet supplemented with sugarbeet fibre (200 g/kg diet) or carboxymethyl cellulose (40 g/kg diet). We propose that a higher GE rate contributes, at least in part, to lower gastric colonisation levels of lactobacilli in mice fed a purified diet.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0007114514000968DOI Listing
August 2014

Different impacts of purified and nonpurified diets on microbiota and toll-like receptors in the mouse stomach.

Biosci Biotechnol Biochem 2012 7;76(9):1728-32. Epub 2012 Sep 7.

Graduate School of Agriculture, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8589, Japan.

We compared the colonization of lactobacilli in the stomachs of mice fed nonpurified and purified diets and examined to determine whether the expression of Toll-like receptor 2, which is involved in the recognition of lactobacilli, is influenced by diet. Female BALB/c mice were fed a nonpurified or a purified diet for 2 weeks. Conventional cultivation and cultivation-independent molecular biological analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that the number of lactobacilli associated with the gastric tissue was significantly higher in the mice fed the nonpurified diet than in those fed the purified diet. Sequencing analysis indicated that L. gasseri and L. johnsonii were predominant Lactobacillus species associated with the gastric tissue of the mice fed the nonpurified diet. The mRNA levels of Toll-like receptor 2, but not of 9, in the gastric tissue were significantly higher in the mice fed the purified diet than in those fed the nonpurified diet. We propose that nonpurified and purified diets have different impacts on gastric microbiota, which can in turn influence the expression of Toll-like receptor 2 in the stomach.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1271/bbb.120334DOI Listing
February 2013

2,4-Dinitrofluorobenzene-induced contact hypersensitivity response in NC/Nga mice fed fructo-oligosaccharide.

J Nutr Sci Vitaminol (Tokyo) 2010 ;56(4):260-5

Graduate School of Life Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan.

Strategies to manipulate gut microbiota in infancy have been considered to prevent the development of allergic diseases later in life. We previously demonstrated that maternal dietary supplementation with fructo-oligosaccharide (FOS) during pregnancy and lactation modulated the composition of gut microbiota and diminished the severity of spontaneously developing atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in the offspring of NC/Nga mice. The present study tested whether dietary FOS affects contact hypersensitivity (CHS), another model for allergic skin disease, in NC/Nga mice. In experiment 1, 5-wk-old female NC/Nga mice were fed diets either with or without FOS supplementation for 3 wk and then received 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB) on the ear auricle 5 times at 7-d intervals. FOS supplementation reduced CHS response as demonstrated by ear swelling. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that mRNA levels for interleukin (IL)-10, IL-12p40, and IL-17 in the lesional ear skin were significantly lower in mice fed FOS. In experiment 2, female NC/Nga mice were fed diets either with or without FOS during pregnancy and lactation. After weaning, offspring were fed the diets supplemented with or without FOS. Three weeks after weaning, offspring received DNFB on the ear auricle 4 times at 7-d intervals. Although FOS supplementation after weaning reduced ear swelling, maternal FOS consumption was ineffective in offspring. The present data suggest that dietary FOS reduces CHS while maternal FOS consumption is ineffective in offspring of DNFB-treated NC/Nga mice.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3177/jnsv.56.260DOI Listing
February 2011
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