Publications by authors named "Yung-Ning Chang"

7 Publications

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The RESOLUTE consortium: unlocking SLC transporters for drug discovery.

Authors:
Giulio Superti-Furga Daniel Lackner Tabea Wiedmer Alvaro Ingles-Prieto Barbara Barbosa Enrico Girardi Ulrich Goldmann Bettina Gürtl Kristaps Klavins Christoph Klimek Sabrina Lindinger Eva Liñeiro-Retes André C Müller Svenja Onstein Gregor Redinger Daniela Reil Vitaly Sedlyarov Gernot Wolf Matthew Crawford Robert Everley David Hepworth Shenping Liu Stephen Noell Mary Piotrowski Robert Stanton Hui Zhang Salvatore Corallino Andrea Faedo Maria Insidioso Giovanna Maresca Loredana Redaelli Francesca Sassone Lia Scarabottolo Michela Stucchi Paola Tarroni Sara Tremolada Helena Batoulis Andreas Becker Eckhard Bender Yung-Ning Chang Alexander Ehrmann Anke Müller-Fahrnow Vera Pütter Diana Zindel Bradford Hamilton Martin Lenter Diana Santacruz Coralie Viollet Charles Whitehurst Kai Johnsson Philipp Leippe Birgit Baumgarten Lena Chang Yvonne Ibig Martin Pfeifer Jürgen Reinhardt Julian Schönbett Paul Selzer Klaus Seuwen Charles Bettembourg Bruno Biton Jörg Czech Hélène de Foucauld Michel Didier Thomas Licher Vincent Mikol Antje Pommereau Frédéric Puech Veeranagouda Yaligara Aled Edwards Brandon J Bongers Laura H Heitman Ad P IJzerman Huub J Sijben Gerard J P van Westen Justine Grixti Douglas B Kell Farah Mughal Neil Swainston Marina Wright-Muelas Tina Bohstedt Nicola Burgess-Brown Liz Carpenter Katharina Dürr Jesper Hansen Andreea Scacioc Giulia Banci Claire Colas Daniela Digles Gerhard Ecker Barbara Füzi Viktoria Gamsjäger Melanie Grandits Riccardo Martini Florentina Troger Patrick Altermatt Cédric Doucerain Franz Dürrenberger Vania Manolova Anna-Lena Steck Hanna Sundström Maria Wilhelm Claire M Steppan

Nat Rev Drug Discov 2020 07;19(7):429-430

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/d41573-020-00056-6DOI Listing
July 2020

Structural basis for functional interactions in dimers of SLC26 transporters.

Nat Commun 2019 05 2;10(1):2032. Epub 2019 May 2.

Institute of Biochemistry, Biocenter, Goethe University Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue Str. 9, 60438, Frankfurt am Main, Germany.

The SLC26 family of transporters maintains anion equilibria in all kingdoms of life. The family shares a 7 + 7 transmembrane segments inverted repeat architecture with the SLC4 and SLC23 families, but holds a regulatory STAS domain in addition. While the only experimental SLC26 structure is monomeric, SLC26 proteins form structural and functional dimers in the lipid membrane. Here we resolve the structure of an SLC26 dimer embedded in a lipid membrane and characterize its functional relevance by combining PELDOR/DEER distance measurements and biochemical studies with MD simulations and spin-label ensemble refinement. Our structural model reveals a unique interface different from the SLC4 and SLC23 families. The functionally relevant STAS domain is no prerequisite for dimerization. Characterization of heterodimers indicates that protomers in the dimer functionally interact. The combined structural and functional data define the framework for a mechanistic understanding of functional cooperativity in SLC26 dimers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-10001-wDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6497670PMC
May 2019

The novel class of seven transmembrane segment inverted repeat carriers.

Biol Chem 2017 02;398(2):165-174

Solute carriers from the SLC4, SLC23, and SLC26 families are involved in pH regulation, vitamin C transport and ion homeostasis. While these families do not share any obvious sequence relationship, they are united by their unique and novel architecture. Each member of this structural class is organized into two structurally related halves of seven transmembrane segments each. These halves span the membrane with opposite orientations and form an intricately intertwined structure of two inverted repeats. This review highlights the general design principles of this fold and reveals the diversity between the different families. We discuss their domain architecture, structural framework and transport mode and detail an initial transport mechanism for this fold inferred from the recently solved structures of different members.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/hsz-2016-0254DOI Listing
February 2017

Structure of a prokaryotic fumarate transporter reveals the architecture of the SLC26 family.

Nat Struct Mol Biol 2015 Oct 14;22(10):803-8. Epub 2015 Sep 14.

Department of Biochemistry, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.

The SLC26 family of membrane proteins combines a variety of functions within a conserved molecular scaffold. Its members, besides coupled anion transporters and channels, include the motor protein Prestin, which confers electromotility to cochlear outer hair cells. To gain insight into the architecture of this protein family, we characterized the structure and function of SLC26Dg, a facilitator of proton-coupled fumarate symport, from the bacterium Deinococcus geothermalis. Its modular structure combines a transmembrane unit and a cytoplasmic STAS domain. The membrane-inserted domain consists of two intertwined inverted repeats of seven transmembrane segments each and resembles the fold of the unrelated transporter UraA. It shows an inward-facing, ligand-free conformation with a potential substrate-binding site at the interface between two helix termini at the center of the membrane. This structure defines the common framework for the diverse functional behavior of the SLC26 family.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nsmb.3091DOI Listing
October 2015

Ser(262) determines the chloride-dependent colour tuning of a new halorhodopsin from Haloquadratum walsbyi.

Biosci Rep 2012 Oct;32(5):501-9

Department of Biochemical Science and Technology, College of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan.

Light is an important environmental signal for all organisms on earth because it is essential for physiological signalling and the regulation of most biological systems. Halophiles found in salt-saturated ponds encode various archaeal rhodopsins and thereby harvest various wavelengths of light either for ion transportation or as sensory mediators. HR (halorhodopsin), one of the microbial rhodopsins, senses yellow light and transports chloride or other halides into the cytoplasm to maintain the osmotic balance during cell growth, and it exists almost ubiquitously in all known halobacteria. To date, only two HRs, isolated from HsHR (Halobacterium salinarum HR) and NpHR (Natronomonas pharaonis HR), have been characterized. In the present study, two new HRs, HmHR (Haloarcula marismortui HR) and HwHR (Haloquadratum walsbyi HR), were functionally overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the maximum absorbance (λmax) of the purified proteins, the light-driven chloride uptake and the chloride-binding affinity were measured. The results showed them to have similar properties to two HRs reported previously. However, the λmax of HwHR is extremely consistent in a wide range of salt/chloride concentrations, which had not been observed previously. A structural-based sequence alignment identified a single serine residue at 262 in HwHR, which is typically a conserved alanine in all other known HRs. A Ser262 to alanine replacement in HwHR eliminated the chloride-independent colour tuning, whereas an Ala246 to serine mutagenesis in HsHR transformed it to have chloride-independent colour tuning similar to that of HwHR. Thus Ser262 is a key residue for the mechanism of chloride-dependent colour tuning in HwHR.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1042/BSR20120054DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3475450PMC
October 2012

A novel six-rhodopsin system in a single archaeon.

J Bacteriol 2010 Nov 27;192(22):5866-73. Epub 2010 Aug 27.

Institute of Microbiology and Biochemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan.

Microbial rhodopsins, a diverse group of photoactive proteins found in Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya, function in photosensing and photoenergy harvesting and may have been present in the resource-limited early global environment. Four different physiological functions have been identified and characterized for nearly 5,000 retinal-binding photoreceptors, these being ion transporters that transport proton or chloride and sensory rhodopsins that mediate light-attractant and/or -repellent responses. The greatest number of rhodopsins previously observed in a single archaeon had been four. Here, we report a newly discovered six-rhodopsin system in a single archaeon, Haloarcula marismortui, which shows a more diverse absorbance spectral distribution than any previously known rhodopsin system, and, for the first time, two light-driven proton transporters that respond to the same wavelength. All six rhodopsins, the greatest number ever identified in a single archaeon, were first shown to be expressed in H. marismortui, and these were then overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The proteins were purified for absorption spectra and photocycle determination, followed by measurement of ion transportation and phototaxis. The results clearly indicate the existence of a proton transporter system with two isochromatic rhodopsins and a new type of sensory rhodopsin-like transducer in H. marismortui.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JB.00642-10DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2976437PMC
November 2010