Publications by authors named "Yumin Lu"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Construction of a Promising Tumor-Infiltrating CD8+ T Cells Gene Signature to Improve Prediction of the Prognosis and Immune Response of Uveal Melanoma.

Front Cell Dev Biol 2021 28;9:673838. Epub 2021 May 28.

Department of Ophthalmology, Guangzhou Red Cross Hospital, Jinan University, Guangzhou, China.

Background: CD8+ T cells work as a key effector of adaptive immunity and are closely associated with immune response for killing tumor cells. It is crucial to understand the role of tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T cells in uveal melanoma (UM) to predict the prognosis and response to immunotherapy.

Materials And Methods: Single-cell transcriptomes of UM with immune-related genes were combined to screen the CD8+ T-cell-associated immune-related genes (CDIRGs) for subsequent analysis. Next, a prognostic gene signature referred to tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T cells was constructed and validated in several UM bulk RNA sequencing datasets. The risk score of UM patients was calculated and classified into high- or low-risk subgroup. The prognostic value of risk score was estimated by using multivariate Cox analysis and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Moreover, the potential ability of gene signature for predicting immunotherapy response was further explored.

Results: In total, 202 CDIRGs were screened out from the single-cell RNA sequencing of GSE139829. Next, a gene signature containing three CDIRGs (, , and ) was identified, which was considered as an independent prognostic indicator to robustly predict overall survival (OS) and metastasis-free survival (MFS) of UM. In addition, the UM patients were classified into high- and low-risk subgroups with different clinical characteristics, distinct CD8+ T-cell immune infiltration, and immunotherapy response. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) showed that immune pathways such as allograft rejection, inflammatory response, interferon alpha and gamma response, and antigen processing and presentation were all positively activated in low-risk phenotype.

Conclusion: Our work gives an inspiration to explain the limited response for the current immune checkpoint inhibitors to UM. Besides, we constructed a novel gene signature to predict prognosis and immunotherapy responses, which may be regarded as a promising therapeutic target.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fcell.2021.673838DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8194278PMC
May 2021

Diffusion-weighted imaging with background body signal suppression (DWIBS) distinguishes benign lesions from malignant pulmonary solitary lesions.

Am J Transl Res 2021 15;13(1):88-101. Epub 2021 Jan 15.

Department of Radiology, People's Hospital of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region Nanning, China.

This study aimed to determine applicable value of DWIBS in diagnosis of solitary pulmonary lesions. This study involved 32 solitary lung disease patients. T1W1, T2W1, T2WI-SPAIR were examined using MRI scanner and analyzed with View-forum 6.0 workstation. Imaging characteristics of pulmonary solitary lesions on DWIBS and ADC when b=300, 500 and 800 s/mm were observed. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-noise-ratio (CNR) and ADC value of lesions under different b-values were measured. Image quality in different b-values was compared by analyzing SNR and CNR. ADC values of benign and malignant lesions in different b-value groups were tested using -test. ROC curve was used to evaluate diagnostic efficacy of ADC value, and obtain diagnostic threshold. The results indicated that SNR and CNR value of 300 and 500 s/mm group was significantly higher compared to 800 s/mm group (<0.05). When b-value was assigned as 500 s/mm, DWIBS demonstrated better and ideal images. ADC value of malignant lesions in different b-values was significantly lower compared to benign lesions (<0.05), suggesting ADC value is a feasible approach for distinguishing benign from malignant lesions. AUC value of b=500 s/mm was significantly higher compared to b=300 and b=800 s/mm group (<0.05). When b-value was assigned as 500 s/mm, the best ADC threshold value was 1.435×10 mm/s, with high sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 80.0%, 83.3% and 84.4%, respectively. In conclusion, quantitative analysis of DWIBS examination and ADC value was helpful for qualitative diagnosis of pulmonary solitary lesions, and demonstrated potential to distinguish benign and malignant pulmonary solitary lesions.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7847530PMC
January 2021

CT features of COVID-19 patients with two consecutive negative RT-PCR tests after treatment.

Sci Rep 2020 07 14;10(1):11548. Epub 2020 Jul 14.

Department of Ophthalmology, People's Hospital of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, Nanning, China.

The objective of this study is to expound the CT features of COVID-19 patients whose throat swab samples were negative for two consecutive nucleic acid tests after treatment. We retrospectively reviewed 46 COVID-19 patients with two consecutive negative RT-PCR tests after treatment. The cases were divided into moderate group and severe/critical group according to disease severity. Clinical and CT scanning data were collected. CT signs of pulmonary lesions and the score of lung involvement were expounded. Thirty-nine moderate cases and seven severe/critical cases were included. Residual pulmonary lesions were visible in CT images. Moderate patients showed peripheral lesions while severe/critical cases exhibited both central and peripheral lesions with all lobes involvement. Mixed ground glass opacity (GGO) and pulmonary consolidation were noted. A larger proportion of severe patients showed reticular pulmonary interstitium thickening. Air bronchogram, pleural effusion, vascular enlargement, bronchial wall thickening, bronchiectasis, pleural thickening and pleural adhesion were more frequently observed in severe/critical group. The severe/critical group showed higher CT score. Pulmonary lesions persisted even after twice consecutive negative nucleic acid tests. We strongly recommended regular follow-up of CT scans after nucleic acid tests conversion. Evaluation of complete remission should base on chest CT.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-68509-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7360570PMC
July 2020

X-ray-induced changes in the expression of inflammation-related genes in human peripheral blood.

Int J Mol Sci 2014 Oct 27;15(11):19516-34. Epub 2014 Oct 27.

Department of Toxicology, Henan Institute of Occupational Medicine, Zhengzhou 450052, China.

Using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) array, we explored and compared the expression changes of inflammation-related genes in human peripheral blood irradiated with 0.5, 3, and 10 Gy doses of X-rays 24 h after exposure. Results indicated that the expression of 62 out of 84 genes was significantly altered after X-ray radiation. Among these 62 genes, 35 (such as TNFSF4) are known to be associated with radiation response, but others are novel. At a low radiation dose (0.5 Gy), 9 genes were up-regulated and 19 were down-regulated. With further increased dose to 3 Gy, 8 unique genes were up-regulated and 19 genes were down-regulated. We also identified 48 different genes that were differentially expressed significantly after 10 Gy of irradiation, and among these transcripts, up-regulated genes accounted for only one-third (16 genes) of the total. Of the 62 genes, 31 were significantly altered only at a specific dose, and a total of 10 genes were significantly expressed at all 3 doses. The dose- and time-dependent expression of CCL2 was confirmed by quantitative real-time reverse-transcription PCR. A number of candidate genes reported herein may be useful molecular biomarkers of radiation exposure in human peripheral blood.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms151119516DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4264126PMC
October 2014

Autoantibodies to tumor-associated antigens as biomarkers in cancer immunodiagnosis.

Autoimmun Rev 2011 Apr 15;10(6):331-5. Epub 2010 Dec 15.

Department of Clinical Laboratory Technology, Dalian Municipal Central Hospital, Dalian, Liaoning 116033, China.

Cancer sera contain antibodies that react with a unique group of autologous cellular antigens called tumor-associated antigens (TAAs), and therefore these autoantibodies can be considered as reporters from the immune system, to identify authentic TAAs involved in the malignant transformation. Once a TAA is identified, different approaches would be used to comprehensively characterize and validate the identified TAA/anti-TAA systems that are potential biomarkers in cancer immunodiagnosis. In this manner, several novel TAAs such as p62 and p90 have been identified in our previous studies. p62, a member of IGF-II mRNA binding proteins (IMPs), is an oncofetal protein absent in adult tissues, the presence of anti-p62 autoantibodies relates to abnormal expression of p62 in tumor cells. p90 was recently characterized as an inhibitor of the tumor suppressor PP2A (protein phosphatase 2A), and an autoantibody to p90 appears in high frequency in prostate cancer. The present review will focus on the recent advances in studies mainly associated with these two novel TAAs as biomarkers in cancer immunodiagnosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.autrev.2010.12.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3119819PMC
April 2011

A structurally novel salt-regulated promoter of duplicated carbonic anhydrase gene 1 from Dunaliella salina.

Mol Biol Rep 2010 Feb;37(2):1143-54

Laboratory for Cell Biology, Department of Biology, Zhengzhou University, 100 Kexue Avenue, Zhengzhou, Henan, 450001, People's Republic of China.

It has been demonstrated that the duplicated carbonic anhydrase is induced by salt in the Dunaliella salina (D. salina) and duplicated carbonic anhydrase 1 (DCA1) is a member of carbonic anhydrase family. The purpose of this study was to identify whether both the DCA1 gene and its promoter from D. salina are salt-inducible. In this study, the results of real time RT-PCR showed that the transcripts of DCA1 were induced by gradient concentration of sodium chloride. Subsequently, a structurally novel promoter containing highly repeated GT/AC sequences of the DCA1 gene was isolated, which was able to drive a stable expression of the foreign bar gene in transformed cells of D. salina, and the gradient concentrations of sodium chloride in media paralleled regulations in the levels of both proteins and mRNA of the bar gene driven by the DCA1 promoter. Furthermore, analysis of GUS activities revealed that the salt-inducible expression of the external gus gene was regulated by the promoter fragments containing highly repeated GT sequences, but not by the promoter fragments deleting highly repeated GT sequences. The findings above-mentioned suggest that the highly repeated GT sequence in the DCA1 promoter is involved in the salt-inducible regulation in D. salina and may be a novel salt-inducible element.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11033-009-9901-zDOI Listing
February 2010

The nitrate reductase gene-switch: a system for regulated expression in transformed cells of Dunaliella salina.

Gene 2007 Nov 19;403(1-2):132-42. Epub 2007 Aug 19.

Laboratory for Cell Biology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Henan 450052, PR China.

The control of promoter activity by nitrogen source has recently emerged as an intriguing system for regulated expression of the heterologous genes. The purpose of this work was to investigate whether heterologous gene expression in transgenic Dunaliella salina would be controlled by an inducible promoter. Here we identify that the nitrate reductase (NR) transcripts of D. salina are induced by nitrate but repressed by ammonium. The bar gene integrated into the genome of D. salina is transcribed by a promoter of the NR gene from D. salina and the bar transcripts are induced by nitrate but repressed by ammonium. PPT-resistance of transformants disappears when they are transferred from nitrate-containing medium to ammonium-containing medium. The findings of this study demonstrate that the promoter of the D. salina NR gene can be used to control expression of the heterologous genes in transgenic D. salina.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gene.2007.08.001DOI Listing
November 2007

Clinical manifestations and outcomes in severe ulcerative colitis.

Front Med China 2007 May;1(2):192-5

Department of Gastroenterology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing, 100083, China,

In order to evaluate the clinical manifestations and outcomes of severe ulcerative colitis (UC), we retrospectively reviewed 41 patients with severe UC from 144 consecutively hospitalized UC cases from 1988 to 2004. Data recorded included onset, symptoms, signs, laboratory results, endoscopic, radiologic and pathologic findings, the clinical treatment process and follow-up. Of these severe cases, 92.7% (38/41) had pancolitis. Clinically, 36.9% (15/41) were categorized as first onset type, 36.9% (15/41) were chronic persistent and 26.8% (11/41) were chronic recurrent. Steroids played a main role in the remission of severe UC (61.0%). Thirty-one cases (75.6%) were relieved by drug therapy. Seven cases (17.1%) progressed to the need for operation. An early age of onset, pancolitis, low hemoglobin and serum albumin levels, and the need for intravenous steroids tended to be associated with the need for surgery. In conclusion, most of the severe UC patients respond well to drug therapy, but for individuals who are unresponsive to drug therapy, or for those depending on steroids, after a reasonable duration of treatment, the necessity for surgery should be considered.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11684-007-0036-0DOI Listing
May 2007

[Expression of interleukin 18 in intestinal mucosa of patients with inflammatory bowel disease and its implications].

Beijing Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban 2003 Apr;35(2):150-3

Department of Gastroenterology, Peking University Third Hospital, China.

Objective: To investigate the expression of interleukin 18 (IL-18) in intestinal mucosa of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and its relation with disease active state.

Methods: IL-18mRNA transcripts were evaluated by using a semiquantitative RT-PCR protocol. Specimens of 23 Crohn's disease (CD) and 20 ulcerative colitis (UC) patients and 20 controls were studied by immunohistochemical staining.

Results: Transcripts of IL-18 were found to be increased significantly in intestinal mucosa from active CD compared with UC and control. Immunohistochemical staining analysis localized the expression of IL-18 to intestinal epithelial cells and lamina propria (macrophages and dendritic cells, mainly). Staining was more intense in active CD compared with UC and control. Both transcriptions and staining of IL-18 in active UC were elevated, but there was no significant difference compared with control. Expression of IL-18 decreased in inactive CD (n = 9) or UC (n = 11) compared with active state of the same patients, and the difference in CD had significance.

Conclusion: IL-18 may be involved in the pathogenesis of IBD and related with CD activity.
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April 2003
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