Publications by authors named "Yumi Aga"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Number of Synergies Is Dependent on Spasticity and Gait Kinetics in Children With Cerebral Palsy.

Pediatr Phys Ther 2018 01;30(1):34-38

Department of Physical Therapy (Mr Hashiguchi), Faculty of Health Science, Gunma Paz University, Gunma, Japan; Department of Physical Therapy (Drs Ohata and Yamada), Human Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan; Kuretake Special Support School and Kita Special Support School (Ms Osako), Kyoto, Japan; Kansai Rehabilitation Hospital (Dr Kitatani), Osaka, Japan; Aijinkai Rehabilitation Hospital (Ms Aga), Osaka, Japan; Department of Physical Therapy (Dr Masaki), Niigata University of Health and Welfare, Niigata, Japan.

Purpose: Children with cerebral palsy have motor dysfunctions, which are mainly associated with the loss of motor coordination. For the assessment of motor coordination, muscle synergies calculated by nonnegative matrix factorization have been investigated. However, the characteristics of muscle synergies in children with cerebral palsy are not understood.

Methods: This study compared the number of muscle synergies during gait between children with cerebral palsy and children with typical development and clarified whether certain clinical parameters differed according to the number of synergies.

Results: Children with cerebral palsy had significantly fewer synergies than children developing typically. The extent of spasticity and gait kinetics differed according to the number of synergies.

Conclusion: Increases in the number of synergies are limited by severe spasticity. The muscle synergies calculated by nonnegative matrix factorization have the potential to enable the quantification of motor coordination during gait.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEP.0000000000000460DOI Listing
January 2018

Merging and Fractionation of Muscle Synergy Indicate the Recovery Process in Patients with Hemiplegia: The First Study of Patients after Subacute Stroke.

Neural Plast 2016 19;2016:5282957. Epub 2016 Dec 19.

Department of Physical Therapy, Human Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan.

Loss of motor coordination is one of the main problems for patients after stroke. Muscle synergy is widely accepted as an indicator of motor coordination. Recently, the characteristics of muscle synergy were quantitatively evaluated using nonnegative matrix factorization (NNMF) with surface electromyography. Previous studies have identified that the number and structure of synergies were associated with motor function in patients after stroke. However, most of these studies had a cross-sectional design, and the changes in muscle synergy during recovery process are not clear. In present study, two consecutive measurements were conducted for subacute patients after stroke and the change of number and structure of muscle synergies during gait were determined using NNMF. Results showed that functional change did not rely on number of synergies in patients after subacute stroke. However, the extent of merging of the synergies was negatively associated with an increase in muscle strength and the range of angle at ankle joint. Our results suggest that the neural changes represented by NNMF were related to the longitudinal change of function and gait pattern and that the merging of synergy is an important marker in patients after subacute stroke.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5282957DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5206781PMC
August 2017

Ankle muscle coactivation during gait is decreased immediately after anterior weight shift practice in adults after stroke.

Gait Posture 2016 Mar 12;45:35-40. Epub 2016 Jan 12.

Department of Physical Therapy, Human Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan.

Increased ankle muscle coactivation during gait has frequently been observed as an adaptation strategy to compensate for postural instability in adults after stroke. However, it remains unclear whether the muscle coactivation pattern increases or decreases after balance training. The aim of this study was to investigate the immediate effects of balance practice on ankle muscle coactivation during gait in adults after stroke. Standing balance practice performed to shift as much weight anteriorly as possible in 24 participants after stroke. The forward movement distance of the center of pressure (COP) during anterior weight shifting, gait speed, and ankle muscle activities during 10-m walking tests were measured immediately before and after balance practice. Forward movement of the COP during anterior weight shifting and gait speed significantly increased after balance practice. On the paretic side, tibialis anterior muscle activity significantly decreased during the single support and second double support phases, and the coactivation index at the ankle joint during the first double support and single support phases significantly decreased after balance practice. However, there were no significant relationships between the changes in gait speed, forward movement of the COP during anterior weight shifting, and ankle muscle coactivation during the stance phase. These results suggested that ankle muscle coactivation on the paretic side during the stance phase was decreased immediately after short-term anterior weight shift practice, which was not associated with improved gait speed or forward movement of the COP during anterior weight shifting in adults after stroke.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gaitpost.2016.01.006DOI Listing
March 2016

Descending neural drives to ankle muscles during gait and their relationships with clinical functions in patients after stroke.

Clin Neurophysiol 2016 Feb 3;127(2):1512-1520. Epub 2015 Nov 3.

Department of Physical Therapy, Human Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan.

Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the descending neural drive to ankle muscles during gait in stroke patients using a coherence analysis of surface electromyographic (EMG) recordings and the relationships of the drive with clinical functions.

Methods: EMG recordings of the paired tibialis anterior (TA), medial and lateral gastrocnemius (MG and LG), and TA-LG muscles were used to calculate intramuscular, synergistic, and agonist-antagonist muscle coherence, respectively, in 11 stroke patients and 9 healthy controls. Paretic motor function, sensory function, spasticity, ankle muscle strength, and gait performance were evaluated.

Results: Paretic TA-TA and MG-LG beta band (15-30 Hz) coherences were significantly lower compared with the non-paretic side and controls. TA-LG beta band coherence was significantly higher on both sides compared with controls. Paretic TA-TA beta band coherence positively correlated with gait speed, and paretic TA-LG beta band coherence negatively correlated with paretic ankle plantar flexor muscle strength.

Conclusions: The intramuscular and synergistic muscle neural drives were reduced during gait on the paretic side in stroke patients. The agonist-antagonist muscle neural drive was increased to compensate for paretic ankle muscle weakness.

Significance: Descending neural drive reorganization to agonist-antagonist muscles is important for patients with paretic ankle muscle weakness.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clinph.2015.10.043DOI Listing
February 2016
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