Publications by authors named "Yuki Kitsuda"

4 Publications

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Association between preoperative low muscle mass and psychological factors after surgery among patients with lumbar spinal stenosis: A longitudinal study.

J Clin Neurosci 2021 Jul 27;89:8-14. Epub 2021 Apr 27.

Rehabilitation Division, Tottori University Hospital, 36-1 Nishi-cho, Yonago, Tottori 683-8504, Japan; School of Health Science, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, 86 Nishi-cho, Yonago, Tottori 683-8503, Japan.

It remains controversial whether preoperative low muscle mass affects clinical outcomes after lumbar surgery. Previous studies evaluated outcomes such as pain, quality of life, and disability, but none investigated preoperative low muscle mass and psychological factors. The purpose of this study was to clarify the association between preoperative low muscle mass and postoperative psychological factors in lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). A longitudinal analysis was performed in 85 consecutive preoperative patients with LSS. Demographic data, leg pain, low back pain, Japanese Orthopaedic Association score, Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) score, Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire on Physical Activity (FABQ-PA) score, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) score, walking velocity, grip strength, and appendicular lean mass were assessed. Muscle mass was measured using bioelectrical impedance analysis. Patients were divided into two groups based on skeletal muscle mass index. These clinical outcomes were evaluated preoperatively and 1 year after surgery. In the 73 patients who were analyzed 1 year after surgery, the prevalence of preoperative low muscle mass was 21.9%. The normal muscle mass group showed significantly improved PCS, FABQ-PA, HADS-anxiety, and HADS-depression scores 1 year after surgery. The low muscle mass group did not demonstrate significantly improved PCS, FABQ-PA, or HADS-depression scores, and had a significantly smaller increase in the FABQ-PA score than the normal muscle mass group. Multivariate analysis showed that low muscle mass was significantly related to change in FABQ-PA score. Our results suggest that preoperative low muscle mass hinders improvement in fear-avoidance beliefs 1 year after surgery.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jocn.2021.04.008DOI Listing
July 2021

Impact of high-load resistance training on bone mineral density in osteoporosis and osteopenia: a meta-analysis.

J Bone Miner Metab 2021 Apr 13. Epub 2021 Apr 13.

Rehabilitation Division, Tottori University Hospital, 36-1 Nishi-cho, Yonago, Tottori, 683-8504, Japan.

Introduction: This study aimed to examine the effect of high-load resistance training (HLRT) on bone mineral density (BMD) in patients with osteoporosis and osteopenia using a meta-analysis.

Materials And Methods: We searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on HLRT in patients with osteoporosis and osteopenia from medical databases. Our meta-analysis was performed with the primary endpoints being the standardized mean difference (SMD) of the change in BMD of the lumbar spine (LS), femoral neck (FN), and total hip (TH). The robustness of the results was assessed by subgroup analysis. Heterogeneity factors were examined by meta-regression. Publication bias was evaluated using a funnel plot.

Results: We selected nine RCTs, with 259 patients in the HLRT group (women, 55.2%) and 236 patients in the control group (women, 62.7%). The HLRT group showed a significant increase in BMD in the LS [SMD = 1.40, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.68-2.12, p < 0.001, I = 90%], the FN (SMD = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.05-1.67, p = 0.04, I = 92%), and the TH (SMD = 1.26, 95% CI = 0.45-2.08, p = 0.002, I = 91%). Subgroup analysis confirmed the robustness of the results only in LS. Total sessions and a high risk of bias were identified as the factors of heterogeneity in FN and TH (p < 0.05). The funnel plot showed asymmetry in all measurement sites.

Conclusion: This study suggested that HLRT can be effective in increasing BMD, mainly of LS, in patients with osteoporosis and osteopenia. However, due to high heterogeneity and publication bias, additional studies with a low risk of bias should be conducted to generalize our findings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00774-021-01218-1DOI Listing
April 2021

Preoperative low muscle mass is a predictor of falls within 12 months of surgery in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis.

BMC Geriatr 2020 11 30;20(1):516. Epub 2020 Nov 30.

Rehabilitation Division, Tottori University Hospital, 36-1 Nishi-cho, Yonago, Tottori, 683-8504, Japan.

Background: Patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) may be at high risk of falls due to various factors. No effective fall risk assessments or fall prevention measures have been performed for patients with LSS because only a few studies have evaluated falls in these patients. This study aimed to evaluate the incidence and preoperative predictors of falls within 12 months of surgery in patients with LSS.

Methods: In this prospective study of 82 consecutive preoperative patients with LSS, preoperative demographic data, previous fall history, leg pain, low back pain, Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) scores, lower extremity muscle strength, walking speed, grip strength, and muscle mass were assessed at baseline. Falls were assessed at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after surgery. Participants were categorized as fallers and non-fallers and baseline variables were compared. Binomial logistic regression was used to identify predictors of falls within 12 months of surgery.

Results: Seventy-four patients (90.2%) completed the 12-month follow-up after surgery, of whom 24 patients (32.4%) experienced falls. A higher proportion of fallers were female and had a history of falls compared to non-fallers. Fallers had a significantly lower JOA score and a higher HADS-depression score compared to non-fallers. Fallers had significantly lower tibialis anterior muscle strength, gait speed, grip strength, and skeletal muscle mass index. Fallers had a higher prevalence of low muscle mass compared with non-fallers. The presence of low muscle mass was significantly predictive of falls within 12 months of surgery (odds ratio, 4.46; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-19.63).

Conclusions: Patients with LSS have a high incidence of falls after surgery and preoperative low muscle mass may be a predictor of postoperative falls.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12877-020-01915-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7708230PMC
November 2020

Effectiveness of ultrasonographic skeletal muscle assessment in patients after total knee arthroplasty.

Osteoporos Sarcopenia 2019 Sep 25;5(3):94-101. Epub 2019 Sep 25.

Division of Rehabilitation, Tottori University Hospital, Yonago, Japan.

Objectives: This study aimed to characterize the skeletal muscles of patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty (TKA) using ultrasonography in order to investigate the effectiveness of ultrasonographic skeletal muscle assessment after TKA.

Methods: This study included 50 TKA patients (TKA group) and 41 residents with osteoarthritis who have not received TKA (non-TKA group). Ultrasonography was used to assess the characteristics of several different muscles. Various postoperative outcomes were evaluated. Muscle thickness (MT) and echo intensity (EI) results were compared among operated knees in the TKA group, nonoperated knees in the TKA group, and more severely affected knees in the non-TKA group. For the TKA group, multiple regression was conducted to examine the association between skeletal muscle characteristics of operated knees and postoperative outcomes.

Results: The MTs of the vastus medialis, vastus intermedius, and rectus femoris (RF) were significantly smaller and the RF-EI was significantly greater for both operated and nonoperated knees in the TKA group compared with the non-TKA group (P < 0.017). Several parameters of physical function were significantly poorer in the TKA group than in the non-TKA group (P < 0.05). Multiple regression demonstrated that RF-MT was associated with knee range of motion, knee strength, and physical functional performance in the TKA group (P < 0.05).

Conclusions: The quantity and quality of skeletal muscles were lower in the TKA group than in the non-TKA group. Ultrasonography may be useful for assessing skeletal muscles in TKA patients because MT assessed with ultrasonography was associated with various parameters of physical function.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.afos.2019.09.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6838742PMC
September 2019
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