Publications by authors named "Yuichi Yano"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

MrgprB4 in trigeminal neurons expressing TRPA1 modulates unpleasant sensations.

J Pharmacol Sci 2021 Aug 28;146(4):200-205. Epub 2021 Apr 28.

Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, 46-29 Yoshida-Shimoadachi-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan.

Gentle touch such as stroking of the skin produces a pleasant feeling, which is detected by a rare subset of sensory neurons that express Mas-related G protein-coupled receptor B4 (MrgprB4) in mice. We examined small populations of MrgprB4-positive neurons in the trigeminal ganglion and the dorsal root ganglion, and most of these were sensitive to transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) agonist but not TRPV1, TRPM8, or TRPV4 agonists. Deficiency of MrgprB4 did not affect noxious pain or itch behaviors in the hairless plantar and hairy cheek. Although behavior related to acetone-induced cold sensing in the hind paw was not changed, unpleasant sensory behaviors in response to acetone application or sucrose splash to the cheek were significantly enhanced in Mrgprb4-knockout mice as well as in TRPA1-knockout mice. These results suggest that MrgprB4 in the trigeminal neurons produces pleasant sensations in cooperation with TRPA1, rather than noxious or cold sensations. Pleasant sensations may modulate unpleasant sensations on the cheek via MrgprB4.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jphs.2021.04.006DOI Listing
August 2021

TRPA1 sensitization during diabetic vascular impairment contributes to cold hypersensitivity in a mouse model of painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

Mol Pain 2018 Jan-Dec;14:1744806918789812. Epub 2018 Jul 3.

1 Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Japan.

Background Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a common long-term complication of diabetes. Accumulating evidence suggests that vascular impairment plays important roles in the pathogenesis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy, while the mechanism remains unclear. We recently reported that transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) is sensitized by hypoxia, which can contribute to cold hypersensitivity. In this study, we investigated the involvement of TRPA1 and vascular impairment in painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy using streptozotocin-induced diabetic model mice. Results Streptozotocin-induced diabetic model mice showed mechanical and cold hypersensitivity with a peak at two weeks after the streptozotocin administration, which were likely to be paralleled with the decrease in the skin blood flow of the hindpaw. Streptozotocin-induced cold hypersensitivity was significantly inhibited by an antagonist HC-030031 (100 mg/kg) or deficiency for TRPA1, whereas mechanical hypersensitivity was unaltered. Consistent with these results, the nocifensive behaviors evoked by an intraplantar injection of the TRPA1 agonist allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) were enhanced two weeks after the streptozotocin administration. Both streptozotocin-induced cold hypersensitivity and the enhanced AITC-evoked nocifensive behaviors were significantly inhibited by a vasodilator, tadalafil (10 mg/kg), with recovery of the decreased skin blood flow. Similarly, in a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia induced by the ligation of the external iliac artery, AITC-evoked nocifensive behaviors were significantly enhanced three and seven days after the ischemic operation, whereas mechanical hypersensitivity was unaltered in TRPA1-knockout mice. However, no difference was observed between wild-type and TRPA1-knockout mice in the hyposensitivity for current or mechanical stimulation or the deceased density of intraepidermal nerve fibers eight weeks after the streptozotocin administration. Conclusion These results suggest that TRPA1 sensitization during diabetic vascular impairment causes cold, but not mechanical, hypersensitivity in the early painful phase of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. However, TRPA1 may play little or no role in the progression of diabetic peripheral neuropathy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1744806918789812DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6055098PMC
December 2018

Determination of exposure of dispensary drug preparers to cyclophosphamide by passive sampling and liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry.

J Oncol Pharm Pract 2013 Mar 2;19(1):31-7. Epub 2012 Jul 2.

Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hoshi University, Tokyo, Japan.

Objectives: To determine cyclophosphamide exposure to preparers during tablet crushing and subsequent handling by analyzing indoor air collected using a high-performance volatile organic compounds-solvent desorption (VOC-SD) passive air sampler.

Methods: The passive sampler was taped to the mask over the mouth of the preparer and indoor air was collected during crushing and preparation of cyclophosphamide tablets (Endoxan®). After collection, the carbon molecular sieve adsorbent of the passive sampler was placed in a centrifuge tube, and 1 mL of carbon disulfide was used to elute cyclophosphamide from the adsorbent. Liquid-liquid extraction with 1 mL of water was performed, and the aqueous phase was used as the test solution. Cyclophosphamide concentration was determined by liquid chromatography with ultraviolet and tandem mass spectrometry detection.

Results: Cyclophosphamide concentration was detected in the range of 7.6-157.7 ng/sampler. Our results showed that low-level exposure occurred near the mouth of the preparer, which could present risks for long-term exposure, especially if combined with multiple toxic drug exposures.

Conclusion: The anticancer drug monitoring methodology described here is a simple exposure assessment that can be used to ensure the safety of hospital pharmacy tablet preparers. Furthermore, since the anticancer drug exposure risk is very high for preparers, preparation should be in hood or with face mask.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1078155212451196DOI Listing
March 2013

Proton-coupled electron shuttling in a covalently linked ruthenium-copper heterodinuclear complex.

J Am Chem Soc 2011 Nov 27;133(46):18570-3. Epub 2011 Oct 27.

Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennoudai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571, Japan.

A heterodinuclear complex based on a Ru(II)-TPA [TPA = tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine] complex having a peripheral Cu(II)(bpy)(2) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) group bonded through an amide linkage displayed reversible intramolecular electron transfer between the Ru and Cu complex units that can be controlled by protonation and deprotonation of the bridging amide moiety.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ja208141bDOI Listing
November 2011

Mobilization of rubisco and stroma-localized fluorescent proteins of chloroplasts to the vacuole by an ATG gene-dependent autophagic process.

Plant Physiol 2008 Sep 9;148(1):142-55. Epub 2008 Jul 9.

Department of Applied Plant Science, Graduate School of Agricultural Sciences, Tohoku University, Tsutsumidori-Amamiyamachi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 981-8555, Japan.

During senescence and at times of stress, plants can mobilize needed nitrogen from chloroplasts in leaves to other organs. Much of the total leaf nitrogen is allocated to the most abundant plant protein, Rubisco. While bulk degradation of the cytosol and organelles in plants occurs by autophagy, the role of autophagy in the degradation of chloroplast proteins is still unclear. We have visualized the fate of Rubisco, stroma-targeted green fluorescent protein (GFP) and DsRed, and GFP-labeled Rubisco in order to investigate the involvement of autophagy in the mobilization of stromal proteins to the vacuole. Using immunoelectron microscopy, we previously demonstrated that Rubisco is released from the chloroplast into Rubisco-containing bodies (RCBs) in naturally senescent leaves. When leaves of transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants expressing stroma-targeted fluorescent proteins were incubated with concanamycin A to inhibit vacuolar H(+)-ATPase activity, spherical bodies exhibiting GFP or DsRed fluorescence without chlorophyll fluorescence were observed in the vacuolar lumen. Double-labeled immunoelectron microscopy with anti-Rubisco and anti-GFP antibodies confirmed that the fluorescent bodies correspond to RCBs. RCBs could also be visualized using GFP-labeled Rubisco directly. RCBs were not observed in leaves of a T-DNA insertion mutant in ATG5, one of the essential genes for autophagy. Stroma-targeted DsRed and GFP-ATG8 fusion proteins were observed together in autophagic bodies in the vacuole. We conclude that Rubisco and stroma-targeted fluorescent proteins can be mobilized to the vacuole through an ATG gene-dependent autophagic process without prior chloroplast destruction.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1104/pp.108.122770DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2528122PMC
September 2008