Publications by authors named "Yuexin Jiang"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Harvesting Ambient RF for Presence Detection Through Deep Learning.

IEEE Trans Neural Netw Learn Syst 2020 Dec 23;PP. Epub 2020 Dec 23.

This article explores the use of ambient radio frequency (RF) signals for human presence detection through deep learning. Using Wi-Fi signal as an example, we demonstrate that the channel state information (CSI) obtained at the receiver contains rich information about the propagation environment. Through judicious preprocessing of the estimated CSI followed by deep learning, reliable presence detection can be achieved. Several challenges in passive RF sensing are addressed. With presence detection, how to collect training data with human presence can have a significant impact on the performance. This is in contrast to activity detection when a specific motion pattern is of interest. A second challenge is that RF signals are complex-valued. Handling complex-valued input in deep learning requires careful data representation and network architecture design. Finally, human presence affects CSI variation along multiple dimensions; such variation, however, is often masked by system impediments, such as timing or frequency offset. Addressing these challenges, the proposed learning system uses preprocessing to preserve human motion-induced channel variation while insulating against other impairments. A convolutional neural network (CNN) properly trained with both magnitude and phase information is then designed to achieve reliable presence detection. Extensive experiments are conducted. Using off-the-shelf Wi-Fi devices, the proposed deep-learning-based RF sensing achieves near-perfect presence detection during multiple extended periods of test and exhibits superior performance compared with leading edge passive infrared sensors. A comparison with existing RF-based human presence detection also demonstrates its robustness in performance, especially when deployed in a completely new environment. The learning-based passive RF sensing thus provides a viable and promising alternative for presence or occupancy detection.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/TNNLS.2020.3042908DOI Listing
December 2020

Application of Whole Exome Sequencing in the Clinical Diagnosis and Management of Inherited Cardiovascular Diseases in Adults.

Circ Cardiovasc Genet 2017 Feb;10(1)

From the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine (S.B.S., E.S., L.S., M.D.A.Z., B.A., J.G.A., M.M., D.J., A.M.), Yale Program for Cardiovascular Genetics (S.B.S., E.S., L.S., F.H.-S., A.M.), Department of Genetics, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (D.D., A.E.B., R.P.L., A.M.); Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Radiology (S.B.S.) and Division of Cardiac Imaging (S.B.S.), Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; and Key Laboratory of Clinical Trail Research in Cardiovascular Drugs, Ministry of Health Cardiovascular Institute, Fu Wai Hospital, CAMS and PUMC, Beijing, China (Y.J.).

Background: With the advent of high throughput sequencing, the identification of genetic causes of cardiovascular disease (CVD) has become an integral part of medical diagnosis and management and at the forefront of personalized medicine in this field. The use of whole exome sequencing for clinical diagnosis, risk stratification, and management of inherited CVD has not been previously evaluated.

Methods And Results: We analyzed the results of whole exome sequencing in first 200 adult patients with inherited CVD, who underwent genetic testing at the Yale Program for Cardiovascular Genetics. Genetic diagnosis was reached and reported with a success rate of 26.5% (53 of 200 patients). This compares to 18% (36 of 200) that would have been diagnosed using commercially available genetic panels (P=0.04). Whole exome sequencing was particularly useful for clinical diagnosis in patients with aborted sudden cardiac death, in whom the primary insult for the presence of both depressed cardiac function and prolonged QT had remained unknown. The analysis of the remaining cases using genome annotation and disease segregation led to the discovery of novel candidate genes in another 14% of the cases.

Conclusions: Whole exome sequencing is an exceptionally valuable screening tool for its capability to establish the clinical diagnosis of inherited CVDs, particularly for poorly defined cases of sudden cardiac death. By presenting novel candidate genes and their potential disease associations, we also provide evidence for the use of this genetic tool for the identification of novel CVD genes. Creation and sharing of exome databases across centers of care should facilitate the discovery of unknown CVD genes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/CIRCGENETICS.116.001573DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5245580PMC
February 2017

Widespread positive but weak assortative mating by diet within stickleback populations.

Ecol Evol 2015 Aug 22;5(16):3352-63. Epub 2015 Jul 22.

Department of Integrative Biology, University of Texas at Austin One University Station C0990, Austin, Texas, 78712 ; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Texas at Austin One University Station C0990, Austin, Texas, 78712.

Assortative mating - correlation between male and female traits - is common within populations and has the potential to promote genetic diversity and in some cases speciation. Despite its importance, few studies have sought to explain variation in the extent of assortativeness across populations. Here, we measure assortative mating based on an ecologically important trait, diet as inferred from stable isotopes, in 16 unmanipulated lake populations of three-spine stickleback. As predicted, we find a tendency toward positive assortment on the littoral-pelagic axis, although the magnitude is consistently weak. These populations vary relatively little in the strength of assortativeness, and what variation occurs is not explained by hypothesized drivers including habitat cosegregation, the potential for disruptive selection, costs to choosiness, and the strength of the relationship between diet and body size. Our results support recent findings that most assortative mating is positive, while suggesting that new approaches may be required to identify the environmental variables that drive the evolution of nonrandom mating within populations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ece3.1609DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4569031PMC
August 2015

Differences in rheotactic responses contribute to divergent habitat use between parapatric lake and stream threespine stickleback.

Evolution 2015 Sep 24;69(9):2517-24. Epub 2015 Aug 24.

Department of Integrative Biology, University of Texas at Austin, One University Station C0990, Austin, Texas, 78712.

Migration among populations is widely thought to undermine adaptive divergence, assuming gene flow arises from random movement of individuals. If individuals instead differ in dispersal behavior, phenotype-dependent dispersal can reduce the effective rate of gene flow or even facilitate divergence. For example, parapatric populations of lake and stream stickleback tend to actively avoid dispersing into the adjoining habitat. However, the behavioral basis of this nonrandom dispersal was previously unknown. Here, we show that lake and stream stickleback exhibit divergent rheotactic responses (behavioral response to currents). During the breeding season, wild-caught inlet stream stickleback were better than lake fish at maintaining position in currents, faced upstream more, and spent more time in low-current areas. As a result, stream fish expended significantly less energy in currents than did lake fish. These divergent rheotactic responses likely contribute to divergent habitat use by lake and stream stickleback. Although rheotactic differences were absent in nonbreeding fish, divergent behavior of breeding-season fish may suffice for assortative mating by breeding location. The resulting reproductive isolation between lake and stream fish may explain the fine-scale evolutionary differentiation in parapatric stickleback populations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/evo.12740DOI Listing
September 2015

[Clinical analysis of 160 cases of statin-induced myopathy].

Zhonghua Xin Xue Guan Bing Za Zhi 2014 Nov;42(11):905-9

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Objective: To analyze the clinical features of statin-induced myopathy.

Method: The statin-induced myopathy case reported as adverse drug reaction (ADR) to the Beijing Center for ADR Monitoring during January 2007 to December 2012 was summarized, patients were divided to myopathy group and rhabdomyolysis group, according to the absence or presence of rhabdomylysis. The clinical characteristics, medication history and outcome were compared between the two groups.

Results: A total of 160 statin-induced myopathy cases (54 in rhabdomyolysis group (33.8%) and 106 cases in myopathy group (66.3%)) were collected from the database (mean age: (64.22 ± 13.55) years old, 51.2% male, n = 82). The ADR occurred immediately after the first medication and up to 4 years after medication. Observed clinical features were myalgia, myositis, asymptommatic creatine kinase (CK) elevation or rhabdomyolysis. The average age were (68.54 ± 15.41) years old in rhabdomylysis group and (62.02 ± 12.41) years old in myopathy group (P = 0.004). There was no gender difference between the rhabdomylysis group and myopathy group (P = 0.406) . Twenty-four cases (44.4%) in rhabdomyolysis group and 26 cases (16.5%) in myopathy group were treated with high dose statin (P < 0.001). Percent of simvastatin treatment was significantly higher in rhabdomyolysis group (70.4% (38/54) ) than in myopathy group (32.1% (34/106), P < 0.001). Spearman correlation analysis showed that age, high-dose statin treatment and simvastatin use were all positively correlated with rhabdomylysis (P < 0.001), and the correlation coefficients (r value) were 0.305, 0.290 and 0.364, respectively. Four patients (aged from 71 to 85 years) died because of ADR and all 4 cases received high-dose statin treatment, 3 of them suffered from complex combined diseases, acute disease progression and complex multiple drug use history.

Conclusions: Severe statin-induced myopathy, like rhabdomyolysis, is more likely to occur in old patients, in patients taking high-dose statin, especially simvastatin.
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November 2014

The dynamics of community assembly under sudden mixing in experimental microcosms.

Ecology 2013 Dec;94(12):2898-906

Section of Integrative Biology, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C0930, Austin, Texas 78712, USA.

Landscape connectivity has been shown to alter community assembly and its consequences. Here we examine how strong, sudden changes in connectivity may affect community assembly by conducting experiments on the effects of "community mixing," situations where previously isolated communities become completely connected with consequent community reorganization. Previous theory indicates that assembly history dictates the outcome of mixing: mixing randomly assembled communities leads to a final community with random representation from the original communities, while mixing communities that were assembled via a long history of colonizations and extinctions leads to strong asymmetry, with one community dominating the other. It also predicts that asymmetry should be stronger in the presence of predators in the system. We experimentally tested and explored this theory by mixing aquatic microcosms inhabited by a complex food web of heterotrophic protists, and algae. Our results confirm the prediction that long assembly history can produce asymmetry under mixing and suggest these dynamics could be important in natural systems. However, in contrast to previous theory we also found asymmetry weaker under mixing of communities with more complex trophic structure.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/12-1993.1DOI Listing
December 2013

Assortative mating in animals.

Am Nat 2013 Jun 1;181(6):E125-38. Epub 2013 May 1.

Section of Integrative Biology, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712, USA.

Assortative mating occurs when there is a correlation (positive or negative) between male and female phenotypes or genotypes across mated pairs. To determine the typical strength and direction of assortative mating in animals, we carried out a meta-analysis of published measures of assortative mating for a variety of phenotypic and genotypic traits in a diverse set of animal taxa. We focused on the strength of assortment within populations, excluding reproductively isolated populations and species. We collected 1,116 published correlations between mated pairs from 254 species (360 unique species-trait combinations) in five phyla. The mean correlation between mates was 0.28, showing an overall tendency toward positive assortative mating within populations. Although 19% of the correlations were negative, simulations suggest that these could represent type I error and that negative assortative mating may be rare. We also find significant differences in the strength of assortment among major taxonomic groups and among trait categories. We discuss various possible reasons for the evolution of assortative mating and its implications for speciation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/670160DOI Listing
June 2013

The effect of travel loss on evolutionarily stable distributions of populations in space.

Am Nat 2011 Jul;178(1):15-29

U.S. Geological Survey, Department of Biology, University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida USA, 33124.

A key assumption of the ideal free distribution (IFD) is that there are no costs in moving between habitat patches. However, because many populations exhibit more or less continuous population movement between patches and traveling cost is a frequent factor, it is important to determine the effects of costs on expected population movement patterns and spatial distributions. We consider a food chain (tritrophic or bitrophic) in which one species moves between patches, with energy cost or mortality risk in movement. In the two-patch case, assuming forced movement in one direction, an evolutionarily stable strategy requires bidirectional movement, even if costs during movement are high. In the N-patch case, assuming that at least one patch is linked bidirectionally to all other patches, optimal movement rates can lead to source-sink dynamics where patches with negative growth rates are maintained by other patches with positive growth rates. As well, dispersal between patches is not balanced (even in the two-patch case), leading to a deviation from the IFD. Our results indicate that cost-associated forced movement can have important consequences for spatial metapopulation dynamics. Relevance to marine reserve design and the study of stream communities subject to drift is discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/660280DOI Listing
July 2011