Publications by authors named "Yue-Ping Pan"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

High diversity of basal fungal lineages and stochastic processes controlled fungal community assembly in mangrove sediments.

Appl Environ Microbiol 2021 Jun 30:AEM0092821. Epub 2021 Jun 30.

Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Marine Microbiome Engineering, Institute for Advanced Study, Shenzhen University, 518061, Shenzhen, China.

Fungi are key components of microbial community in mangrove wetlands, with important roles in the transformation of nutrients and energy. However, existing studies typically focus on cultivable fungi, and seldomly on the structure and driving factors of the entire fungal communities. The compositions, community assembly and interaction patterns of mangrove fungal community on large scale remain elusive. Here, biogeography, assembly and co-occurrence patterns of fungal communities in mangrove across Eastern to Southern China were systematically analyzed by targeting the entire ITS region with high-throughput Pacific Biosciences single-molecule real-time sequencing. The analysis recovered a high level of fungal diversity, including a number of basal fungal lineages not previously reported in mangroves, such as and . Beta nearest-taxon index analyses suggested a determinant role of dispersal limitation on fungal community in overall and most individual mangroves, with supporting from the strong distance-decay patterns of community similarity. Further, nonmetric multidimensional scaling analyses revealed a similar biogeography of dominant and rare fungal community. A minor role of environmental selection on the fungal community was noted, with geographical location and sediment depth as crucial factors driving the distribution of both, the dominant and rare taxa. Finally, network analysis revealed high modularized co-occurrence patterns of fungal community in mangrove sediments, and the keystone taxa might play important roles in microbial interactions and ecological functions. The investigation expands our understanding of biogeography, assembly patterns, driving factors, and co-occurrence relationships of mangrove fungi, and will spur the further functional exploration and protection of fungal resources in mangrove. As key components of microbial community in mangroves, fungi have important ecological functions. However, fungal community in mangrove on large scale is generally elusive, and mangroves are declining rapidly due to climate change and anthropogenic activities. This work provided an overview of fungal community structure and biogeography in mangrove wetlands along an over-9000 km coastline across Eastern to Southern China. Our study observed a high number of basal fungal lineages in mangrove sediments, such as and . In addition, our results highlighted a crucial role of dispersal limitation and a minor role of environmental selections on fungal community in mangrove sediments. These novel findings add important knowledge about the structure, assembly processes, and driving factors of fungal community in mangrove sediments.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AEM.00928-21DOI Listing
June 2021

Biogeography, Assembly Patterns, Driving Factors, and Interactions of Archaeal Community in Mangrove Sediments.

mSystems 2021 Jun 15;6(3):e0138120. Epub 2021 Jun 15.

Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Marine Microbiome Engineering, Institute for Advanced Study, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, China.

Archaea are a major part of Earth's life. They are believed to play important roles in nutrient biogeochemical cycling in the mangrove. However, only a few studies on the archaeal community in mangroves have been reported. In particular, the assembly processes and interaction patterns that impact the archaeal communities in mangroves have not been investigated to date. Here, the biogeography, assembly patterns, and driving factors of archaeal communities in seven representative mangroves across southeastern China were systematically analyzed. The analysis revealed that the archaeal community is more diverse in surface sediments than in subsurface sediments, and more diverse in mangroves at low latitudes than at high latitudes, with and as the most diverse and most abundant phyla, respectively. Beta nearest-taxon index analysis suggested a determinant role of homogeneous selection on the overall archaeon community in all mangroves and in each individual mangrove. In addition, the conditionally rare taxon community was strongly shaped by homogeneous selection, while stochastic processes shaped the dominant taxon and always-rare taxon communities. Further, a moderate effect of environmental selection on the archaeal community was noted, with the smallest effect on the always-rare taxon community. Mangrove location, mean annual temperature, and salinity were the major factors that greatly affected the community composition. Finally, network analysis revealed comprehensive cooccurrence relationships in the archaeal community, with a crucial role of . This study expands the understanding of the biogeography, assembly patterns, driving factors, and cooccurrence relationships of the mangrove archaeal community and inspires functional exploration of archaeal resources in mangrove sediments. As a key microbial community component with important ecological roles, archaea merit the attention of biologists and ecologists. The mechanisms controlling microbial community diversity, composition, and biogeography are central to microbial ecology but poorly understood. Mangroves are located at the land-ocean interface and are an ideal environment for examining the above questions. We here provided the first-ever overview of archaeal community structure and biogeography in mangroves located along an over-9,000-km coastline of southeastern China. We observed that archaeal diversity in low-latitude mangroves was higher than that in high-latitude mangroves. Furthermore, our data indicated that homogeneous selection strongly controlled the assembly of the overall and conditionally rare taxon communities in mangrove sediments, while the dominant taxon and always-rare taxon communities were mainly controlled by dispersal limitation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/mSystems.01381-20DOI Listing
June 2021