Publications by authors named "Yue Hang Tang"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Identification of the CIMP-like subtype and aberrant methylation of members of the chromosomal segregation and spindle assembly pathways in esophageal adenocarcinoma.

Carcinogenesis 2016 Apr 10;37(4):356-65. Epub 2016 Feb 10.

Surgical Oncology Group, School of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Translational Research Institute at the Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, Brisbane, Queensland 4102, Australia, Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, Brisbane, Queensland 4102, Australia and.

The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has risen significantly over recent decades. Although survival has improved, cure rates remain poor, with <20% of patients surviving 5 years. This is the first study to explore methylome, transcriptome and ENCODE data to characterize the role of methylation in EAC. We investigate the genome-wide methylation profile of 250 samples including 125 EAC, 19 Barrett's esophagus (BE), 85 squamous esophagus and 21 normal stomach. Transcriptome data of 70 samples (48 EAC, 4 BE and 18 squamous esophagus) were used to identify changes in methylation associated with gene expression. BE and EAC showed similar methylation profiles, which differed from squamous tissue. Hypermethylated sites in EAC and BE were mainly located in CpG-rich promoters. A total of 18575 CpG sites associated with 5538 genes were differentially methylated, 63% of these genes showed significant correlation between methylation and mRNA expression levels. Pathways involved in tumorigenesis including cell adhesion, TGF and WNT signaling showed enrichment for genes aberrantly methylated. Genes involved in chromosomal segregation and spindle formation were aberrantly methylated. Given the recent evidence that chromothripsis may be a driver mechanism in EAC, the role of epigenetic perturbation of these pathways should be further investigated. The methylation profiles revealed two EAC subtypes, one associated with widespread CpG island hypermethylation overlapping H3K27me3 marks and binding sites of the Polycomb proteins. These subtypes were supported by an independent set of 89 esophageal cancer samples. The most hypermethylated tumors showed worse patient survival.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/carcin/bgw018DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4806711PMC
April 2016

The Prognostic and Predictive Value of Melanoma-related MicroRNAs Using Tissue and Serum: A MicroRNA Expression Analysis.

EBioMedicine 2015 Jul 12;2(7):671-80. Epub 2015 May 12.

Oncogenomics Group, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston, Brisbane, QLD 4029, Australia.

The overall 5-year survival for melanoma is 91%. However, if distant metastasis occurs (stage IV), cure rates are < 15%. Hence, melanoma detection in earlier stages (stages I-III) maximises the chances of patient survival. We measured the expression of a panel of 17 microRNAs (miRNAs) (MELmiR-17) in melanoma tissues (stage III; n = 76 and IV; n = 10) and serum samples (collected from controls with no melanoma, n = 130; and patients with melanoma (stages I/II, n = 86; III, n = 50; and IV, n = 119)) obtained from biobanks in Australia and Germany. In melanoma tissues, members of the 'MELmiR-17' panel were found to be predictors of stage, recurrence, and survival. Additionally, in a minimally-invasive blood test, a seven-miRNA panel (MELmiR-7) detected the presence of melanoma (relative to controls) with high sensitivity (93%) and specificity (≥ 82%) when ≥ 4 miRNAs were expressed. Moreover, the 'MELmiR-7' panel characterised overall survival of melanoma patients better than both serum LDH and S100B (delta log likelihood = 11, p < 0.001). This panel was found to be superior to currently used serological markers for melanoma progression, recurrence, and survival; and would be ideally suited to monitor tumour progression in patients diagnosed with early metastatic disease (stages IIIa-c/IV M1a-b) to detect relapse following surgical or adjuvant treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ebiom.2015.05.011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4534690PMC
July 2015

MicroRNA and mRNA expression profiling in metastatic melanoma reveal associations with BRAF mutation and patient prognosis.

Pigment Cell Melanoma Res 2015 May 5;28(3):254-66. Epub 2015 Jan 5.

Westmead Millennium Institute, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Melanoma Institute Australia, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

The role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in melanoma is unclear. We examined global miRNA expression profiles in fresh-frozen metastatic melanomas in relation to clinical outcome and BRAF mutation, with validation in independent cohorts of tumours and sera. We integrated miRNA and mRNA information from the same samples and elucidated networks associated with outcome and mutation. Associations with prognosis were replicated for miR-150-5p, miR-142-3p and miR-142-5p. Co-analysis of miRNA and mRNA uncovered a network associated with poor prognosis (PP) that paradoxically favoured expression of miRNAs opposing tumorigenesis. These miRNAs are likely part of an autoregulatory response to oncogenic drivers, rather than drivers themselves. Robust association of miR-150-5p and the miR-142 duplex with good prognosis and earlier stage metastatic melanoma supports their potential as biomarkers. miRNAs overexpressed in association with PP in an autoregulatory fashion will not be suitable therapeutic targets.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/pcmr.12343DOI Listing
May 2015

Genomic catastrophes frequently arise in esophageal adenocarcinoma and drive tumorigenesis.

Nat Commun 2014 Oct 29;5:5224. Epub 2014 Oct 29.

QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston, Brisbane, Queensland 4006, Australia.

Oesophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) incidence is rapidly increasing in Western countries. A better understanding of EAC underpins efforts to improve early detection and treatment outcomes. While large EAC exome sequencing efforts to date have found recurrent loss-of-function mutations, oncogenic driving events have been underrepresented. Here we use a combination of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) and single-nucleotide polymorphism-array profiling to show that genomic catastrophes are frequent in EAC, with almost a third (32%, n=40/123) undergoing chromothriptic events. WGS of 22 EAC cases show that catastrophes may lead to oncogene amplification through chromothripsis-derived double-minute chromosome formation (MYC and MDM2) or breakage-fusion-bridge (KRAS, MDM2 and RFC3). Telomere shortening is more prominent in EACs bearing localized complex rearrangements. Mutational signature analysis also confirms that extreme genomic instability in EAC can be driven by somatic BRCA2 mutations. These findings suggest that genomic catastrophes have a significant role in the malignant transformation of EAC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms6224DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4596003PMC
October 2014

BRAF mutation status is an independent prognostic factor for resected stage IIIB and IIIC melanoma: implications for melanoma staging and adjuvant therapy.

Eur J Cancer 2014 Oct 25;50(15):2668-76. Epub 2014 Jul 25.

QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Oncogenomics Laboratory, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.

Background: 5-year survival for melanoma metastasis to regional lymph nodes (American Joint Committee on Cancer stage III) is <50%. Knowledge of outcomes following therapeutic lymphadenectomy for stage III melanoma related to BRAF status may guide adjuvant use of BRAF/MEK inhibitors along with established and future therapies.

Aims: To determine patterns of melanoma recurrence and survival following therapeutic lymph node dissection (TLND) associated with oncogenic mutations.

Methods: DNA was obtained from patients who underwent TLND and had ⩾2 positive nodes, largest node >3cm or extracapsular invasion. Mutations were detected using an extended Sequenom MelaCARTA panel.

Results: Mutations were most commonly detected in BRAF (57/124 [46%] patients) and NRAS (26/124 [21%] patients). Patients with BRAF mutations had higher 3-year recurrence rate (77%) versus 54% for BRAF wild-type patients (hazard ratio (HR) 1.8, p=0.008). The only prognostically significant mutations occurred in BRAF: median recurrence-free (RFS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) for BRAF mutation patients was 7 months and 16 months, versus 19 months and not reached for BRAF wild-type patients, respectively. Multivariate analysis identified BRAF mutant status and number of positive lymph nodes as the only independent prognostic factors for RFS and DSS.

Conclusions: Patients with BRAF mutations experienced rapid progression of metastatic disease with locoregional recurrence rarely seen in isolation, supporting incorporation of BRAF status into melanoma staging and use of BRAF/MEK inhibitors post-TLND.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejca.2014.06.009DOI Listing
October 2014

Complex evolutionary relationships among four classes of modular RNA-binding splicing regulators in eukaryotes: the hnRNP, SR, ELAV-like and CELF proteins.

J Mol Evol 2012 Dec 24;75(5-6):214-28. Epub 2012 Nov 24.

School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.

Alternative RNA splicing in multicellular organisms is regulated by a large group of proteins of mainly unknown origin. To predict the functions of these proteins, classification of their domains at the sequence and structural level is necessary. We have focused on four groups of splicing regulators, the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP), serine-arginine (SR), embryonic lethal, abnormal vision (ELAV)-like, and CUG-BP and ETR-like factor (CELF) proteins, that show increasing diversity among metazoa. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses were used to obtain a broader understanding of their evolutionary relationships. Surprisingly, when we characterised sequence similarities across full-length sequences and conserved domains of ten metazoan species, we found some hnRNPs were more closely related to SR, ELAV-like and CELF proteins than to other hnRNPs. Phylogenetic analyses and the distribution of the RRM domains suggest that these proteins diversified before the last common ancestor of the metazoans studied here through domain acquisition and duplication to create genes of mixed evolutionary origin. We propose that these proteins were derived independently rather than through the expansion of a single protein family. Our results highlight inconsistencies in the current classification system for these regulators, which does not adequately reflect their evolutionary relationships, and suggests that a domain-based classification scheme may have more utility.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00239-012-9533-0DOI Listing
December 2012

Functional diversity of the hnRNPs: past, present and perspectives.

Biochem J 2010 Sep;430(3):379-92

University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.

The hnRNPs (heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins) are RNA-binding proteins with important roles in multiple aspects of nucleic acid metabolism, including the packaging of nascent transcripts, alternative splicing and translational regulation. Although they share some general characteristics, they vary greatly in terms of their domain composition and functional properties. Although the traditional grouping of the hnRNPs as a collection of proteins provided a practical framework, which has guided much of the research on them, this approach is becoming increasingly incompatible with current knowledge about their structural and functional divergence. Hence, we review the current literature to examine hnRNP diversity, and discuss how this impacts upon approaches to the classification of RNA-binding proteins in general.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1042/BJ20100396DOI Listing
September 2010

Protein arginine methyltransferase 6 regulates multiple aspects of gene expression.

Nucleic Acids Res 2010 Apr 4;38(7):2201-16. Epub 2010 Jan 4.

The University of Queensland, Diamantina Institute for Cancer, Immunology and Metabolic Medicine, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, QLD 4102, Australia.

It is well established that transcription and alternative splicing events are functionally coupled during gene expression. Here, we report that protein arginine N-methyltransferase 6 (PRMT6) may play a key role in this coupling process by functioning as a transcriptional coactivator that can also regulate alternative splicing. PRMT6 coactivates the progesterone, glucocorticoid and oestrogen receptors in luciferase reporter assays in a hormone-dependent manner. In addition, small interfering RNA (siRNA) oligonucleotide duplex knockdown of PRMT6 disrupts oestrogen-stimulated transcription of endogenous GREB1 and progesterone receptor in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, demonstrating the importance of PRMT6 in hormone-dependent transcription. In contrast, the regulation of alternative splicing by PRMT6 is hormone independent. siRNA knockdown of PRMT6 increases the exon inclusion:skipping ratio of alternatively spliced exons in endogenous vascular endothelial growth factor and spleen tyrosine kinase RNA transcripts in both the presence and absence of oestrogen. These results demonstrate that PRMT6 has a dual role in regulating gene expression and that these two functions can occur independently of each other.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/nar/gkp1203DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2853117PMC
April 2010
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