Publications by authors named "Yu Seong Do"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Thermally rearranged (TR) bismaleimide-based network polymers for gas separation membranes.

Chem Commun (Camb) 2016 Nov;52(93):13556-13559

Department of Energy Engineering, College of Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763, Republic of Korea.

Highly permeable, thermally rearranged polymer membranes based on bismaleimide derivatives that exhibit excellent CO permeability up to 5440 Barrer with a high BET surface area (1130 m g) are reported for the first time. In addition, the membranes can be easily used to form semi-interpenetrating networks with other polymers endowing them with superior gas transport properties.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c6cc06609gDOI Listing
November 2016

Soluble, microporous, Tröger's Base copolyimides with tunable membrane performance for gas separation.

Chem Commun (Camb) 2016 Mar;52(19):3817-20

Department of Energy Engineering, College of Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763, Republic of Korea.

A facile two-step synthesis beginning with commercial monomers to prepare copolyimides by Tröger's Base (TB) formation provides membranes for the first time with tunable gas transport relative to hydrogen separations, CO2 plasticization resistance, and good mechanical and thermal properties.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c5cc09783eDOI Listing
March 2016

Rational molecular design of PEOlated ladder-structured polysilsesquioxane membranes for high performance CO2 removal.

Chem Commun (Camb) 2015 Oct 4;51(83):15308-11. Epub 2015 Sep 4.

Center for Environment, Health and Welfare Research, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarang-ro 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791, Republic of Korea.

Poly(methoxy(polyethyleneoxy)propyl-co-methacryloxypropyl) silsesquioxane membranes with different copolymer ratios were successfully fabricated via UV-induced crosslinking with mechanical stability. By selectively introducing polyethylene oxide (PEO) groups covalently bound to the ladder-structured polysilsesquioxane, we effectively suppressed the PEO crystallization, allowing for excellent CO2/H2 and CO2/N2 separation under single as well as mixed gas conditions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c5cc06269aDOI Listing
October 2015

PM 2.5 collected in a residential area induced Th1-type inflammatory responses with oxidative stress in mice.

Environ Res 2011 Apr 21;111(3):348-55. Epub 2011 Jan 21.

Environmental Health Risk Research Department, National Institute of Environmental Research, Kyungseo-dong, Seo-gu, Incheon 404-708, Republic of Korea.

Epidemiologists have tried to establish an association between human health and exposure to particulate matter (PM). In addition, many researchers have investigated the adverse effects of PM as a trigger of cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases. It is known that a number of environmental contaminants are attached to PM and the toxicity of PM may depend on the sources. We investigated the effects of PM collected in a residential area of Seoul on the immunotoxic responses including cytokine production in BAL fluid and in blood after a single intratracheal instillation in mice with the characterization of physico-chemical properties of PM 2.5 samples. As results, pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1, TNF-α, and IL-6), Th0-type cytokine (IL-2), and Th1-type cytokines (IL-12 and IFN-γ) were increased by a dose-dependent manner. Cell infiltration in the alveolar area and phagocytosis by macrophage was observed until day 28 after instillation. The expressions of oxidative stress-related genes (HSP 1a, HSP 8, and SOD) and tissue damage-related genes (MMP-15, -19, and Slpi) were time-dependently increased. PM 2.5 also induced an increase of T cell distribution in lymphocyte and decreased the CD4+/CD8+ ratio. Based on the results, we suggest that PM 2.5 collected in a residential area of Seoul may induce Th1 type-inflammatory responses with oxidative stress and trigger adverse effects in human health.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envres.2010.11.001DOI Listing
April 2011