Publications by authors named "Yoonhye Na"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Clinical Factors Associated with Balance Function in the Early Subacute Phase after Stroke.

Am J Phys Med Rehabil 2021 Jul 27. Epub 2021 Jul 27.

Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea Brain Convergence Research Center, Korea University, Seoul, Republic of Korea Department of Biomedical Sciences, Korea University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Objective: To investigate the key factors of balance function in the early subacute phase after stroke.

Design: Ninety-four stroke patients were included. Multiple variables were evaluated, including demographic factors, clinical variables (stroke type; lesion site; Korean Mini-Mental State Examination [MMSE]; motor strength of the hip, knee, and ankle joints; Fugl-Meyer Assessment of lower extremity [FMA-LE]); neurophysiologic variables (amplitude ratio of somatosensory evoked potential [SEP] of the tibial nerves), and laterality index of fractional anisotropy (FA-LI) of the corticospinal tract using diffusion tensor imaging. Balance function was measured using the Berg balance scale (BBS).

Results: The BBS score was significantly negatively correlated with age and FA-LI and positively correlated with MMSE; FMA-LE; motor strength of the affected hip, knee, and ankle joint; and SEP amplitude ratio (p < 0.05). The abnormal SEP group and poor integrity of the corticospinal tract group showed significantly decreased BBS scores. In multivariable logistic regression analysis, age, FMA-LE score, and ankle plantar flexion strength were significantly associated with balance function (odds ratios: 0.919, 1.181, and 15.244, respectively, p < 0.05).

Conclusion: Higher age, severe initial motor impairment, and strength of the affected lower extremity muscles, especially the ankle plantar flexor, are strongly associated with poor balance function early after stroke.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PHM.0000000000001856DOI Listing
July 2021

Development of a categorical naming test in Korean: Standardization and clinical application for patients with stroke.

PLoS One 2021 19;16(2):e0247118. Epub 2021 Feb 19.

Brain Convergence Research Center, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop and standardize a new categorical naming test, titled the Categorical Naming Test (CNT), for stroke patients, and to investigate its validity and clinical usefulness for patients with stroke.

Materials And Methods: The CNT was developed based on semantic category, imageability, and psycholinguistic factors such as word frequency and word length. The test materials included two main semantic categories (living objects and artificial objects) comprising 60 items. We standardized the CNT on 221 healthy adults and administered the CNT to 112 stroke patients.

Results: Internal consistency and concurrent validity of the test were high. The mean total CNT scores varied significantly according to participants' age, sex, and education. Among healthy controls, the scores for naming living objects were significantly higher than those for artificial objects. The analysis of stroke patients showed that the total CNT score revealed a statistically significant difference based on the patients' lesion laterality and presence of aphasia, after controlling for age, sex, and education. However, the categorical scores achieved by comparing the naming scores for living and artificial objects showed no significant differences according to lesion laterality, stroke type, and presence of aphasia.

Conclusion: The CNT is a newly developed version of an overt naming task with high internal consistency validity for stroke patients in Korea. The newly developed CNT can prove useful in evaluating naming ability in stroke patients.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0247118PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7895370PMC
August 2021

Clinical and neuroimaging factors associated with aphasia severity in stroke patients: diffusion tensor imaging study.

Sci Rep 2020 07 30;10(1):12874. Epub 2020 Jul 30.

Brain Convergence Research Center, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

This study investigated factors associated with aphasia severity at both 2 weeks and 3 months after stroke using demographic and clinical variables, brain diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) parameters, and lesion volume measurements. Patients with left hemisphere stroke were assessed at 2 weeks (n = 68) and at 3 months (n = 20) after stroke. Demographic, clinical, and neuroimaging data were collected; language functions were assessed using the Western Aphasia Battery. For neuroimaging, DTI parameters, including the laterality index (LI) of fractional anisotropy (FA), axial diffusivity (AD), radial diffusivity, mean diffusivity and fibre density (FD) of the arcuate fasciculus (AF), and lesion volume, were measured. Lesion volume, cortical involvement, and the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score significantly predicted aphasia severity at 2 weeks after stroke, whereas the aphasia quotient and presence of depression during the early subacute stage were significant predictors at 3 months after stroke. According to Pearson correlation, LI-AD and LI-FD were significantly correlated with the aphasia quotient 2 weeks after ischaemic stroke, and the LI-FA was significantly correlated with the aphasia quotient 2 weeks after haemorrhagic stroke, suggesting that the extent and mechanism of AF injuries differ between ischaemic and haemorrhagic strokes. These differences may contribute to aphasia severity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-69741-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7393375PMC
July 2020
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