Publications by authors named "Yongcong Shao"

29 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Circadian misalignment leads to changes in cortisol rhythms, blood biochemical variables and serum miRNA profiles.

Biochem Biophys Res Commun 2021 Aug 12;567:9-16. Epub 2021 Jun 12.

State Key Laboratory of Biocontrol, Key Laboratory of Gene Engineering of the Ministry of Education, School of Life Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510006, China. Electronic address:

The circadian clock plays a critical role in synchronizing the inner molecular, metabolic and physiological processes to environmental cues that cycle with a period of 24 h. Non-24 h and shift schedules are commonly used in maritime operations, and both of which can disturb circadian rhythms. In this study, we first conducted an experiment in which the volunteers followed a 3-d rotary schedule with consecutive shift in sleep time (rotatory schedule), and analyzed the changes in salivary cortisol rhythms and blood variables. Next we conducted another experiment in which the volunteers followed an 8 h-on and 4-h off schedule (non-24-h schedule) to compare the changes in blood/serum variables. The rotatory schedule led to elevated levels of serum cortisol during the early stage, and the phase became delayed during the early and late stages. Interestingly, both of the schedules caused comprehensive changes in blood/serum biochemical variables and increased phosphate levels. Furthermore, transcriptomic analysis of the plasma miRNAs from the volunteers following the rotatory schedule identified a subset of serum miRNAs targeting genes involved in circadian rhythms, sleep homeostasis, phosphate transport and multiple important physiological processes. Overexpression of miRNAs targeting the phosphate transport associated genes, SLC20A1 and SLC20A2, showed altered expression due to rotary schedule resulted in attenuated cellular levels of phosphate, which might account for the changed levels in serum phosphate. These findings would further our understanding of the deleterious effects of shift schedules and help to optimize and enhance the performances and welfare of personnel working on similar schedules.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbrc.2021.06.015DOI Listing
August 2021

Decreased Functional Connectivity in the Reward Network and Its Relationship With Negative Emotional Experience After Total Sleep Deprivation.

Front Neurol 2021 12;12:641810. Epub 2021 May 12.

Department of Psychology Medical, The Eighth Medical Center, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, China.

Sleep deprivation (SD) induces a negative emotional experience due to a prolonged time spent awake. However, few studies have focused on the mechanism underlying communication within brain networks or alterations during this emotional deterioration. We propose that negative reward judgment is important in poor emotional processing after SD, which will be reflected in functional connectivity in the reward network. We sought to analyze alterations in functional connectivity within the reward network and cerebral cortex. Furthermore, we analyzed changes in functional connectivity correlation with negative emotional experience after SD. Twenty-six healthy volunteers participated in this study. Two resting-state fMRI scans were obtained from the participants, once during resting wakefulness, and once after 36 h of total SD. The bilateral nucleus accumbens (NAc) was selected as a seed region for region of interest (ROI)-to-ROI functional connectivity analysis. Correlation analyses between functional connectivity alterations within the reward network and negative emotional experience were also performed. We found that SD decreased functional connectivity between the left NAc and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) compared with resting wakefulness. There was a decreased functional connectivity with the ACC and right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) after SD in the right NAc. Furthermore, decreased functional connectivity between the right NAc and right IFG, and NAc and ACC was negatively correlated with emotional experience scores. Sleep deprivation decreased functional connectivity within the reward network. This may be associated with the enhanced negative emotional experience that was found after total sleep deprivation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fneur.2021.641810DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8153184PMC
May 2021

Neurobiological Bases of Social Networks.

Front Psychol 2021 30;12:626337. Epub 2021 Apr 30.

School of Psychology, Beijing Sport University, Beijing, China.

A social network is a web that integrates multiple levels of interindividual social relationships and has direct associations with an individual's health and well-being. Previous research has mainly focused on how brain and social network structures (structural properties) act on each other and on how the brain supports the spread of ideas and behaviors within social networks (functional properties). The structure of the social network is correlated with activity in the amygdala, which links decoding and interpreting social signals and social values. The structure also relies on the mentalizing network, which is central to an individual's ability to infer the mental states of others. Network functional properties depend on multilayer brain-social networks, indicating that information transmission is supported by the default mode system, the valuation system, and the mentalizing system. From the perspective of neuroendocrinology, overwhelming evidence shows that variations in oxytocin, β-endorphin and dopamine receptor genes, including oxytocin receptor (), mu opioid receptor 1 () and dopamine receptor 2 (), predict an individual's social network structure, whereas oxytocin also contributes to improved transmission of emotional and behavioral information from person to person. Overall, previous studies have comprehensively revealed the effects of the brain, endocrine system, and genes on social networks. Future studies are required to determine the effects of cognitive abilities, such as memory, on social networks, the characteristics and neural mechanism of social networks in mental illness and how social networks change over time through the use of longitudinal methods.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2021.626337DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8119875PMC
April 2021

Decreased P2 Waveform Reflects Impaired Brain Executive Function Induced by 12 h of Low Homeostatic Sleep Pressure: Evidence From an Event-Related Potential Study.

Front Neurosci 2021 24;15:599919. Epub 2021 Mar 24.

The Second Medical Center, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, China.

Homeostatic sleep pressure can cause cognitive impairment, in which executive function is the most affected. Previous studies have mainly focused on high homeostatic sleep pressure (long-term sleep deprivation); thus, there is still little related neuro-psycho-physiological evidence based on low homeostatic sleep pressure (12 h of continuous wakefulness) that affects executive function. This study aimed to investigate the impact of lower homeostatic sleep pressure on executive function. Our study included 14 healthy young male participants tested using the Go/NoGo task in normal resting wakefulness (10:00 am) and after low homeostatic sleep pressure (10:00 pm). Behavioral data (response time and accuracy) were collected, and electroencephalogram (EEG) data were recorded simultaneously, using repeated measures analysis of variance for data analysis. Compared with resting wakefulness, the participants' response time to the Go stimulus was shortened after low homeostatic sleep pressure, and the correct response rate was reduced. Furthermore, the peak amplitude of Go-P2 decreased significantly, and the peak latency did not change significantly. For NoGo stimulation, the peak amplitude of NoGo-P2 decreased significantly ( < 0.05), and the peak latency was significantly extended ( < 0.05). Thus, the P2 wave is likely related to the attention and visual processing and reflects the early judgment of the perceptual process. Therefore, the peak amplitude of Go-P2 and NoGo-P2 decreased, whereas the peak latency of NoGo-P2 increased, indicating that executive function is impaired after low homeostatic sleep pressure. This study has shown that the P2 wave is a sensitive indicator that reflects the effects of low homeostatic sleep pressure on executive function, and that it is also an important window to observe the effect of homeostatic sleep pressure and circadian rhythm on cognitive function.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnins.2021.599919DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8024631PMC
March 2021

Decreased effective connectivity between insula and anterior cingulate cortex during a working memory task after prolonged sleep deprivation.

Behav Brain Res 2021 Jul 26;409:113263. Epub 2021 Mar 26.

Key Laboratory of Behavioral Science, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100101, China; Department of Psychology, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China. Electronic address:

Total sleep deprivation (TSD) causes a decline in almost all cognitive domains, especially working memory. However, we do not have a clear understanding of the degree working memory is impaired under prolonged TSD, nor do we know the underlying neurophysiological mechanism. In this study, we recorded EEG data from 64 subjects while they performed a working memory task during resting wakefulness, after 24 h TSD, and after 30 h TSD. ANOVA was used to verify performance differences between 24 h and 30 h TSD in working memory tasks: (1) reaction time and accuracy hit rates, (2) P200, N200, and P300 amplitude and latency in measurements of event-related potential, as well as (3) effective connectivity strength between brain areas associated with working memory. Compared to 24 h TSD, 30 h TSD significantly decreased accuracy hit rates and induced a larger N200 difference waveform. The effective connectivity analysis showed that 30 h TSD also decreased beta frequency in effective connection strength from the right insular lobe to the left anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Effective connection from the left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex increased in the match condition of the 2-back task. In conclusion, 30 h TSD had a greater negative impact on working memory than 24 h TSD. This impairment of working memory is associated with decreased strength in the effective connection from the right insula to the left ACC.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbr.2021.113263DOI Listing
July 2021

Decreased Functional Connectivity Between the Right Precuneus and Middle Frontal Gyrus Is Related to Attentional Decline Following Acute Sleep Deprivation.

Front Neurosci 2020 21;14:530257. Epub 2020 Dec 21.

Department of Neurology, The Second Medical Center, National Clinical Research Centre for Geriatric Diseases, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, China.

Objectives: Acute sleep deprivation (SD) seriously affects cognitive functions, such as attention, memory, and response inhibition. Previous neuroimaging studies have demonstrated a close relationship between the functional activities of the precuneus (PC) and the function of alert attention. However, the specific effect of the PC on attention decline after acute SD has not been elucidated. In this study, we used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study the relationship between the changes of the PC functional connectivity and alertness decline after total SD.

Methods: Thirty healthy, right-handed adult men participated in the experiment. Alert attention and functional connectivity were assessed by the Psychomotor Vigilance Test and a resting-state fMRI scan before and after total SD. The region of interest to region of interest ("ROI-to-ROI") correlation was employed to analyze the relationship between the PC and other brain regions after acute SD.

Results: Participants showed decreased alert attention after total SD. In addition, SD induced decreased functional connectivity between the right PC and the right middle frontal gyrus (MFG). Moreover, there was a significant correlation between the decreased PC functional connectivity and alertness decline after total SD.

Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the interruption of the connection between the right PC and the right MFG is related to the observed decline in alert attention after acute SD. These results provide evidence further elucidating the cognitive impairment model of SD.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnins.2020.530257DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7779587PMC
December 2020

Effects of Sleep Deprivation on Working Memory: Change in Functional Connectivity Between the Dorsal Attention, Default Mode, and Fronto-Parietal Networks.

Front Hum Neurosci 2020 12;14:360. Epub 2020 Oct 12.

Department of Respiratory Medicine, Qingdao Huangdao People's Hospital, Qingdao, China.

Sleep deprivation (SD) is very common in modern society and has a profound effect on cognitive function, in particular on working memory (WM). This type of memory is required for completion of many tasks and is adversely affected by SD. However, the cognitive neural mechanism by which SD affects WM, remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the changes in the brain network involved in WM after SD. Twenty-two healthy subjects underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging scan while in a state of resting wakefulness and again after 36 h of total SD and performed a WM task before each scanning session. Nineteen main nodes of the default mode network (DMN), dorsal attention network (DAN), fronto-parietal network (FPN), salience network (SN), and other networks were selected for functional analysis of brain network connections. Functional connectivity measures were computed between seed areas for region of interest (ROI)-to-ROI analysis and to identify patterns of ROI-to-ROI connectivity. The relationship between the significant changes in functional connectivity in the brain network and WM performance were then examined by Pearson's correlation analysis. WM performance declined significantly after SD. Compared with the awake state, the functional connectivity between DAN and DMN significantly increased after SD while that between FPN and DMN significantly decreased. Correlation analysis showed that the enhanced functional connectivity between DAN and DMN was negatively correlated with the decline in WM performance and that the decline in functional connectivity between FPN and DMN was positively correlated with decreased WM performance. These findings suggested that SD may affect WM by altering the functional connectivity among DMN, DAN, and FPN.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2020.00360DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7588803PMC
October 2020

Total Sleep Deprivation Impairs Lateralization of Spatial Working Memory in Young Men.

Front Neurosci 2020 6;14:562035. Epub 2020 Oct 6.

China Institute of Sports and Health Science, Beijing Sport University, Beijing, China.

Total sleep deprivation (TSD) negatively affects cognitive function. Previous research has focused on individual variation in cognitive function following TSD, but we know less about how TSD influences the lateralization of spatial working memory. This study used event-related-potential techniques to explore asymmetry in spatial-working-memory impairment. Fourteen healthy male participants performed a two-back task with electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings conducted at baseline and after 36 h of TSD. We selected 12 EEG points corresponding to left and right sides of the brain and then observed changes in N2 and P3 components related to spatial working memory. Before TSD, P3 amplitude differed significantly between the left and right sides of the brain. This difference disappeared after TSD. Compared with baseline, P3 amplitude decreased for a duration as extended as the prolonged latency of N2 components. After 36 h of TSD, P3 amplitude decreased more in the right hemisphere than the left. We therefore conclude that TSD negatively affected spatial working memory, possibly through removing the right hemisphere advantage.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnins.2020.562035DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7573126PMC
October 2020

The Network Structure of Decision-Making Competence in Chinese Adults.

Front Psychol 2020 18;11:563023. Epub 2020 Sep 18.

School of Psychology, Beijing Sport University, Beijing, China.

Decision-making competence refers to the ability to make better decisions, as defined by decision-making principles posited by models of rational choice. The adult decision-making competence (A-DMC) scale is a relatively mature evaluation tool used for decision-making competence. However, the A-DMC is yet far from other mature psychological evaluation tools, and especially the structure of A-DMC remains unclear. In the current study, we estimated a regularized partial correlation network of decision-making competence in a Chinese sample consisting of 339 adults who were evaluated by the A-DMC, and then the centrality indicators were calculated. The results revealed that all nodes of the decision-making competence networks are positively associated, except for the association of resistance to framing (RF) and resistance to sunk costs (SC). The strongest edge was between RF and applying decision rules (DR; regularized partial correlation = 0.37). The centrality indicators of RF and applying DR were highest, revealing that these two variables may play important roles in the decision-making competence network. Our study conceptualizes the decision-making competence from network perspectives, so as to provide some insights for future researches.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2020.563023DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7530243PMC
September 2020

Effects of Caffeine on Event-Related Potentials and Neuropsychological Indices After Sleep Deprivation.

Front Behav Neurosci 2020 22;14:108. Epub 2020 Jun 22.

Department of Operational Medicine, Tianjin Institute of Environmental and Operational Medicine, Tianjin, China.

: Caffeine is a central nervous system stimulant that can effectively alleviate brain fatigue and low cognitive efficiency induced by total sleep deprivation (TSD). Recent studies have demonstrated that caffeine can improve subjective attention and objective behavioral metrics, such as arousal level, reaction time, and memory efficiency. However, only a few studies have examined the electrophysiological changes caused by the caffeine in humans following sleep disturbance. In this study, an event-related potential (ERP) technique was employed to measure the behavioral, cognitive, and electrophysiological changes produced by caffeine administration after TSD. : Sixteen healthy subjects within-subject design performed a visual Go/No-Go task with simultaneous electroencephalogram recording. Behavioral and ERP data were evaluated after 36 h of TSD, and the effects of ingestion of either 400 mg of caffeine or placebo were compared in a double-blind randomized design. : Compared with placebo administration, the Go hit rates were significantly enhanced in the caffeine condition. A simple effect analysis revealed that, compared with baseline, the Go-P2 amplitude was significantly enhanced after TSD in the caffeine consumption condition. A significant main effect of the drug was found on No-Go-P2, No-Go-N2 amplitude, and Go-P2 latency before and after TSD. : Our findings indicate that caffeine administration has acute effects on improving the efficiency of individual automatic reactions and early cognitive processes. Caffeine was related to the preservation of an individual's arousal level and accelerated response-related decisions, while subjects' higher-level recognition had limited improvement with prolonged awareness.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnbeh.2020.00108DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7347038PMC
June 2020

Coach-Athlete Attachment and the Subjective Well-Being of Athletes: A Multiple-Mediation Model Analysis.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2020 06 29;17(13). Epub 2020 Jun 29.

School of Psychology, Beijing Sport University, Beijing 100084, China.

The current study aims to explore how coach-athlete attachment affects the subjective well-being (SWB) of athletes and is primarily focused on the confirmation of the mediating roles of athletes' perceived coach support and self-esteem in the relationship between them. A total of 179 Chinese athletes participated in this study, in which they responded to questions comprising a coach-athlete attachment scale, a perceived coach support measurement, the Rosenberg self-esteem scale, and SWB measures. The results suggest that both attachment anxiety and attachment avoidance significantly predict SWB in athletes. The effects of attachment anxiety on SWB are partially mediated by perceived coach support and self-esteem, and the effects of attachment avoidance on SWB are completely mediated by perceived coach support and self-esteem. Moreover, a chain mediating effect was found: coach-athlete attachment → perceived coach support → self-esteem → SWB. These findings extend the conclusions of prior reports and shed light on how coach-athlete attachment influences the athlete's well-being.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17134675DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7369865PMC
June 2020

Effect of Sleep Deprivation on the Working Memory-Related N2-P3 Components of the Event-Related Potential Waveform.

Front Neurosci 2020 19;14:469. Epub 2020 May 19.

Naval Special Forces Recuperation Center, Qingdao, China.

Working memory is very sensitive to acute sleep deprivation, and many studies focus on the brain areas or network activities of working memory after sleep deprivation. However, little is known about event-related potential (ERP)-related changes in working memory after sleep loss. The purpose of this research was to explore the effects of 36 h of total sleep deprivation (TSD) on working memory through ERPs. Sixteen healthy college students performed working memory tasks while rested and after 36 h of TSD, and electroencephalography (EEG) data were simultaneously recorded while the subjects completed working memory tasks that included different types of stimulus materials. ERP data were statistically analyzed using repeated measurements analysis of variance to observe the changes in the working memory-related N2-P3 components. Compared with baseline before TSD, the amplitude of N2-P3 components related to working memory decreased, and the latency was prolonged after TSD. However, the increased amplitude of the P2 wave and the prolonged latency were found after 36 h of TSD. Thus, TSD can impair working memory capacity, which is characterized by lower amplitude and prolonged latency.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnins.2020.00469DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7248549PMC
May 2020

Decreased Information Replacement of Working Memory After Sleep Deprivation: Evidence From an Event-Related Potential Study.

Front Neurosci 2019 26;13:408. Epub 2019 Apr 26.

School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing, China.

Working memory (WM) components are altered after total sleep deprivation (TSD), both with respect to information replacement and result judgment. However, the electrophysiological mechanisms of WM alterations following sleep restriction remain largely unknown. To identify such mechanisms, event-related potentials were recorded during the n-back WM task, before and after 36 h sleep deprivation. Thirty-one young volunteers participated in this study and performed a two-back WM task with simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG) recording before and after TSD and after 8 h time in bed for recovery (TIBR). Repeated measures analysis of variance revealed that, compared to resting wakefulness, sleep deprivation induced a decrease in the P200 amplitude and induced longer reaction times. ERP-component scalp topographies results indicated that such decrease primarily occurred in the frontal cortex. The N200 and P300 amplitudes also decreased after TSD. Our results suggest that decreased information replacement of WM occurs after 36 h of TSD and that 8 h TIBR after a long period of TSD leads to partial restoration of WM functions. The present findings represent the EEG profile of WM during mental fatigue.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnins.2019.00408DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6499035PMC
April 2019

Enhanced high-frequency precuneus-cortical effective connectivity is associated with decreased sensory gating following total sleep deprivation.

Neuroimage 2019 08 25;197:255-263. Epub 2019 Apr 25.

The Sixth Medical Center, The General Hospital of the People's Liberation Army, Beijing, 100048, China. Electronic address:

Sleep deprivation decreases an individual's cognitive function. When cognitive impairment reaches a certain level, human errors occur and may even result in accidents. Previous research has shown that sensory gating is a basic mechanism in cognitive function, but only limited studies have so far reported how it is affected by sleep deprivation. This study aimed to analyze the effects of sleep deprivation on sensory gating and its cognitive and neural mechanisms. Thirty-six healthy subjects participated in our study. The resting-state, auditory P50-task electroencephalography (EEG) recordings and the psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) were performed at resting wakefulness (RW) and after 36 h of total sleep deprivation (TSD). Changes in P50 suppression before and after sleep deprivation were recorded, and the isolated effective coherence (iCoh) was employed for analyzing effective connectivity based on EEG data during the resting-state and P50 tasks. Subjects demonstrated reduced P50 suppression and prolonged PVT reaction time after TSD compared with RW. Effective connectivity analysis of resting-state EEG data showed that sleep deprivation decreased the connectivity from the right middle occipital gyrus (RMOG)/Rcuneus to left inferior/middle temporal gyrus (LITG/LMTG) and left parahippocampal/fusiform gyrus (LPH/LFG). EEG data analysis during the P50 task showed that, in addition to the aforementioned connectivity changes, the directed high-frequency effective connectivity from the left precuneus to the left superior/middle frontal gyrus (LSFG/LMFG), LITG/LMTG, LPH/LFG, and left middle occipital gyrus (LMOG)/Lcuneus increased. P50 suppression in Cz positively correlated with PVT reaction time. This study reveals that the precuneus is a key brain region in neural network correlates of sensory gating, and that changes in its effective connectivity with other regions (including LSFG/LMFG, LPH/LFG, LMOG/LCuneus, and LITG/LMTG) are important for decreasing sensory gating after TSD.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2019.04.057DOI Listing
August 2019

Alterations in Cerebellar Functional Connectivity Are Correlated With Decreased Psychomotor Vigilance Following Total Sleep Deprivation.

Front Neurosci 2019 21;13:134. Epub 2019 Feb 21.

Department of Neurology, The Second Medical Center, Sleep Medicine Research Center, National Clinical Research Center for Geriatric Disease, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Chinese PLA Medical School, Beijing, China.

Previous studies have reported significant changes in functional connectivity among various brain networks following sleep restriction. The cerebellum plays an important role in information processing for motor control and provides this information to higher-order networks. However, little is known regarding how sleep deprivation influences functional connectivity between the cerebellum and the cerebral cortex in humans. The present study aimed to investigate the changes in cerebellar functional connectivity induced by sleep deprivation, and their relationship with psychomotor vigilance. A total of 52 healthy men underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging before and after 36 h of total sleep deprivation. Functional connectivity was evaluated using region of interest (ROI)-to-ROI analyses, using 26 cerebellar ROIs as seed regions. Psychomotor vigilance was assessed using the psychomotor vigilance test (PVT). Decreased functional connectivity was observed between cerebellar seed regions and the bilateral postcentral, left inferior frontal, left superior medial frontal, and right middle temporal gyri. In contrast, increased functional connectivity was observed between the cerebellum and the bilateral caudate. Furthermore, decrease in functional connectivity between the cerebellum and the postcentral gyrus was negatively correlated with increase in PVT reaction times, while increase in functional connectivity between the cerebellum and the bilateral caudate was positively correlated with increase in PVT reaction times. These results imply that altered cerebellar functional connectivity is associated with impairment in psychomotor vigilance induced by sleep deprivation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnins.2019.00134DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6393739PMC
February 2019

Sleep deprivation and a non-24-h working schedule lead to extensive alterations in physiology and behavior.

FASEB J 2019 06 6;33(6):6969-6979. Epub 2019 Mar 6.

Ministry of Education (MOE) Key Laboratory of Gene Function and Regulation, School of Life Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Biocontrol, and.

Most organisms on Earth possess circadian rhythms in their physiology and behaviors that allow them to resonate with the cycling environment over a 24-h period. However, in human society, a substantial quantity of jobs requires non-24-h working and rest or shift schedules, which causes more or less misalignment in circadian rhythms and disorders as a consequence. In this work, we conducted a sleep deprivation (SD) and non-24-h working and rest schedule (8 h on and 4 h off) experiment over 10 d in total and measured the changes in a series of physiologic and cognitive parameters. The results show that although the subjects could sleep during the schedule, their sleepiness increased significantly. Actigraphy data suggest that a 12-h schedule might result in chronic SD. Along with the increased sleepiness revealed by the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale questionnaire, the neurobehavioral psychomotor vigilance test data reveal that, compared with the control period, the reaction time of the subjects was significantly delayed. The saliva insulin levels were significantly changed in the morning in SD and non-24-h cycles. Salivary biochemical parameters were also altered, including aspartate aminotransferase and K. 16S rRNA-based analysis of the salivary microbiota showed differentially changed patterns in bacteria composition and concentration. Together, these data demonstrate that an abnormal working and rest schedule might produce comprehensive interference with circadian rhythms, metabolism, and cognition.-Ma, H., Li, Y., Liang, H., Chen, S., Pan, S., Chang, L., Li, S., Zhang, Y., Liu, X., Xu, Y., Shao, Y., Yang, Y., Guo, J. Sleep deprivation and a non-24-h working schedule lead to extensive alterations in physiology and behavior.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1096/fj.201802727RDOI Listing
June 2019

Transcranial direct current stimulation reconstructs diminished thalamocortical connectivity during prolonged resting wakefulness: a resting-state fMRI pilot study.

Brain Imaging Behav 2020 Feb;14(1):278-288

Cognitive and Mental Health Research Center, Beijing Institute of Basic Medical Science, 27 Taiping Road, Haidian District, Beijing, 100850, People's Republic of China.

Reductions in the alertness and information processing capacity of individuals due to sleep deprivation (SD) were previously thought to be related to dysfunction of the thalamocortical network. Previous studies have shown that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) can restore vigilance and information processing after SD. However, the underlying neural mechanisms of this phenomenon remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the neurocognitive mechanisms of tDCS following SD, by comparing changes in the brain network, especially the thalamocortical network, after tDCS and sham stimulation following 24 h of SD. Sixteen healthy volunteers were tested in a sham-controlled, randomized crossover design experiment. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging was conducted during resting wakefulness and again after either active tDCS or sham stimulation to the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (1.0 mA, 20 min) immediately following 24 h of SD. Seed-based correlations and graph theory analysis were used to determine functional connectivity within the brain thalamocortical network. When tDCS was used, the functional connectivity of the thalamus with the temporal lobe and left caudate was higher than that when the sham stimulation was used. Analysis using graph theory showed that compared with sham stimulation, tDCS administration was associated with a significant improvement in not only the number of connections but also the global efficiency of the thalamus itself. Our study reveals a modulation of the activity of the intrinsic thalamus networks after tDCS. The effects may help explain earlier reports of improvements in the cognitive performance after anodal-tDCS.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11682-018-9979-9DOI Listing
February 2020

Short-term memory deficits correlate with hippocampal-thalamic functional connectivity alterations following acute sleep restriction.

Brain Imaging Behav 2017 08;11(4):954-963

Department of Geriatric Neurology, Sleep Medicine Research Center, Chinese PLA General Hospital, The General Hospital of the People's Liberation Army, Beijing, 100853, People's Republic of China.

Acute sleep restriction heavily influences cognitive function, affecting executive processes such as attention, response inhibition, and memory. Previous neuroimaging studies have suggested a link between hippocampal activity and short-term memory function. However, the specific contribution of the hippocampus to the decline of short-term memory following sleep restriction has yet to be established. In the current study, we utilized resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine the association between hippocampal functional connectivity (FC) and the decline of short-term memory following total sleep deprivation (TSD). Twenty healthy adult males aged 20.9 ± 2.3 years (age range, 18-24 years) were enrolled in a within-subject crossover study. Short-term memory and FC were assessed using a Delay-matching short-term memory test and a resting-state fMRI scan before and after TSD. Seed-based correlation analysis was performed using fMRI data for the left and right hippocampus to identify differences in hippocampal FC following TSD. Subjects demonstrated reduced alertness and a decline in short-term memory performance following TSD. Moreover, fMRI analysis identified reduced hippocampal FC with the superior frontal gyrus (SFG), temporal regions, and supplementary motor area. In addition, an increase in FC between the hippocampus and bilateral thalamus was observed, the extent of which correlated with short-term memory performance following TSD. Our findings indicate that the disruption of hippocampal-cortical connectivity is linked to the decline in short-term memory observed after acute sleep restriction. Such results provide further evidence that support the cognitive impairment model of sleep deprivation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11682-016-9570-1DOI Listing
August 2017

Recovery Sleep Reverses Impaired Response Inhibition due to Sleep Restriction: Evidence from a Visual Event Related Potentials Study.

PLoS One 2015 10;10(12):e0142361. Epub 2015 Dec 10.

Beijing Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Beijing, PR China.

Objective: To investigate response inhibition after total sleep deprivation (TSD) and the restorative effects of one night of recovery sleep (RS).

Methods: Fourteen healthy male participants performed a visual Go/NoGo task, and electroencephalogram recordings were conducted at five time points: (1) baseline, (2) after 12 h of TSD, (3) after 24 h of TSD, (4) after 36 h of TSD, and (5) following 8 h of RS. The dynamic changes in response inhibition during TSD and after 8 h of RS were investigated by examining the NoGo-N2 and NoGo-P3 event-related potential components.

Results: Compared with baseline, NoGo-P3 amplitudes were decreased, while the NoGo-N2 latency increased along with the awake time prolonged. NoGo anteriorization, which was minimized after 24 h of TSD, progressively decreased with increasing TSD. After 8 h of RS, recoveries of both the NoGo-P3 amplitude and NoGo-N2 latency in the prefrontal cortex were observed compared with the values after 36 h of TSD.

Conclusion: TSD induced a dose-dependent functional decline in the response inhibition of NoGo-N2 and NoGo-P3 on prefrontal cortex activation, and 8 h of RS resulted in recovery or maintenance of the response inhibition. However, it was not restored to baseline levels.

Limitations: Participants were chosen male college students only, thus the findings cannot be generalized to older people and women. Additionally, the sample size was small, and, thus, speculations on the meaning of the results of this study should be cautious. The EEG continuous recording should be employed to monitor the decline of alertness following TSD.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0142361PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4684334PMC
July 2016

Altered superficial amygdala-cortical functional link in resting state after 36 hours of total sleep deprivation.

J Neurosci Res 2015 Dec 8;93(12):1795-803. Epub 2015 Sep 8.

Cognitive and Mental Health Research Center, Beijing Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Beijing, People's Republic of China.

The superficial amygdala (SFA) is important in human emotion/affective processing via its strong connection with other limbic and cerebral cortex for receptive and expressive emotion processing. Few studies have investigated the functional connectivity changes of the SFA under extreme conditions, such as prolonged sleep loss, although the SFA showed a distinct functional connectivity pattern throughout the brain. In this study, resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) was employed to investigate the changes of SFA-cortical functional connectivity after 36 hr of total sleep deprivation (TSD). Fourteen healthy male volunteers aged 25.9 ± 2.3 years (range 18-28 years) enrolled in this within-subject crossover study. We found that the right SFA showed increased functional connectivity with the right medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and decreased functional connectivity with the right dorsal posterior cingulate cortex (dPCC) in the resting brain after TSD compared with that during rested wakefulness. For the left SFA, decreased connectivity with the right dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and right dPCC was found. Further regression analysis indicated that the functional link between mPFC and SFA significantly correlated with the Profile of Mood State scores. Our results suggest that the amygdala cannot be treated as a single unit in human neuroimaging studies and that TSD may alter the functional connectivity pattern of the SFA, which in turn disrupts emotional regulation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jnr.23601DOI Listing
December 2015

Abnormal resting-state functional connectivity of the nucleus accumbens in multi-year abstinent heroin addicts.

J Neurosci Res 2015 Nov 17;93(11):1693-702. Epub 2015 Aug 17.

Cognitive and Mental Health Research Center, Beijing Institute of Basic Medical Science, Beijing, People's Republic of China.

Functional neuroimaging studies suggest that abnormal brain functional connectivity may be the neural underpinning of addiction to illicit drugs and of relapse after successful cessation therapy. Aberrant brain networks have been demonstrated in addicted patients and in newly abstinent addicts. However, it is not known whether abnormal brain connectivity patterns persist after prolonged abstinence. In this cross-sectional study, whole-brain resting-state functional magnetic resonance images (8 min) were collected from 30 heroin-addicted individuals after a long period of abstinence (more than 3 years) and from 30 healthy controls. We first examined the group differences in the resting-state functional connectivity of the nucleus accumbens (NAc), a brain region implicated in relapse-related processes, including craving and reactivity to stress following acute and protracted withdrawal from heroin. We then examined the relation between the duration of abstinence and the altered NAc functional connectivity in the heroin group. We found that, compared with controls, heroin-dependent participants exhibited significantly greater functional connectivity between the right ventromedial prefrontal cortex and the NAc and weaker functional connectivity between the NAc and the left putamen, left precuneus, and supplementary motor area. However, with longer abstinence time, the strength of NAc functional connectivity with the left putamen increased. These results indicate that dysfunction of the NAc functional network is still present in long-term-abstinent heroin-dependent individuals.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jnr.23608DOI Listing
November 2015

Large-Scale Brain Network Coupling Predicts Total Sleep Deprivation Effects on Cognitive Capacity.

PLoS One 2015 28;10(7):e0133959. Epub 2015 Jul 28.

Beijing Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Beijing, PR China; Cognitive and Mental Health Research Center, Beijing, PR China.

Interactions between large-scale brain networks have received most attention in the study of cognitive dysfunction of human brain. In this paper, we aimed to test the hypothesis that the coupling strength of large-scale brain networks will reflect the pressure for sleep and will predict cognitive performance, referred to as sleep pressure index (SPI). Fourteen healthy subjects underwent this within-subject functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study during rested wakefulness (RW) and after 36 h of total sleep deprivation (TSD). Self-reported scores of sleepiness were higher for TSD than for RW. A subsequent working memory (WM) task showed that WM performance was lower after 36 h of TSD. Moreover, SPI was developed based on the coupling strength of salience network (SN) and default mode network (DMN). Significant increase of SPI was observed after 36 h of TSD, suggesting stronger pressure for sleep. In addition, SPI was significantly correlated with both the visual analogue scale score of sleepiness and the WM performance. These results showed that alterations in SN-DMN coupling might be critical in cognitive alterations that underlie the lapse after TSD. Further studies may validate the SPI as a potential clinical biomarker to assess the impact of sleep deprivation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0133959PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4517902PMC
May 2016

Nature of functional links in valuation networks differentiates impulsive behaviors between abstinent heroin-dependent subjects and nondrug-using subjects.

Neuroimage 2015 Jul 2;115:76-84. Epub 2015 May 2.

Cognitive and Mental Health Research Center, Beijing Institute of Basic Medical Science, Beijing, PR China. Electronic address:

Advanced neuroimaging studies have identified brain correlates of pathological impulsivity in a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders. However, whether and how these spatially separate and functionally integrated neural correlates collectively contribute to aberrant impulsive behaviors remains unclear. Building on recent progress in neuroeconomics toward determining a biological account of human behaviors, we employed resting-state functional MRI to characterize the nature of the links between these neural correlates and to investigate their impact on impulsivity. We demonstrated that through functional connectivity with the ventral medial prefrontal cortex, the δ-network (regions of the executive control system, such as the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex) and the β-network (regions of the reward system involved in the mesocorticolimbic pathway), jointly influence impulsivity measured by the Barratt impulsiveness scale scores. In control nondrug-using subjects, the functional link between the β- and δ-networks is balanced, and the δ-network competitively controls impulsivity. However, in abstinent heroin-dependent subjects, the link is imbalanced, with stronger β-network connectivity and weaker δ-network connectivity. The imbalanced link is associated with impulsivity, indicating that the β- and δ-networks may mutually reinforce each other in abstinent heroin-dependent subjects. These findings of an aberrant link between the β- and δ-networks in abstinent heroin-dependent subjects may shed light on the mechanism of aberrant behaviors of drug addiction and may serve as an endophenotype to mark individual subjects' self-control capacity.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.04.060DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4461497PMC
July 2015

Abnormal gray matter volume and resting-state functional connectivity in former heroin-dependent individuals abstinent for multiple years.

Addict Biol 2016 May 26;21(3):646-56. Epub 2015 Feb 26.

Cognitive and Mental Health Research Center, Beijing Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, China.

Previous studies have suggested that heroin addiction is associated with structural and functional brain abnormalities. However, it is largely unknown whether these characteristics of brain abnormalities would be persistent or restored after long periods of abstinence. Considering the very high rates of relapse, we hypothesized that there may exist some latent neural vulnerabilities in abstinent heroin users. In this study, structural and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data were collected from 30 former heroin-dependent (FHD) subjects who were drug free for more than 3 years and 30 non-addicted control (CN) volunteers. Voxel-based morphometry was used to identify possible gray matter volume differences between the FHD and CN groups. Alterations in resting-state functional connectivity in FHD were examined using brain areas with gray matter deficits as seed regions. Significantly reduced gray matter volume was observed in FHD in an area surrounding the parieto-occipital sulcus, which included the precuneus and cuneus. Functional connectivity analyses revealed that the FHD subjects showed reduced positive correlation within the default mode network and visual network and decreased negative correlation between the default mode network, visual network and task positive network. Moreover, the altered functional connectivity was correlated with self-reported impulsivity scores in the FHD subjects. Our findings suggest that disruption of large-scale brain systems is present in former heroin users even after multi-year abstinence, which could serve as system-level neural underpinnings for behavioral dysfunctions associated with addiction.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/adb.12228DOI Listing
May 2016

Disruptive changes of cerebellar functional connectivity with the default mode network in schizophrenia.

Schizophr Res 2014 Dec 30;160(1-3):67-72. Epub 2014 Oct 30.

Beijing Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Beijing, PR China; Cognitive and Mental Health Research Center, Beijing, PR China. Electronic address:

The default mode network (DMN) plays an important role in the physiopathology of schizophrenia. Previous studies have suggested that the cerebellum participates in higher-order cognitive networks such as the DMN. However, the specific contribution of the cerebellum to the DMN abnormalities in schizophrenia has yet to be established. In this study, we investigated cerebellar functional connectivity differences between 60 patients with schizophrenia and 60 healthy controls from a public resting-state fMRI database. Seed-based correlation analysis was performed by using seeds from the left Crus I, right Crus I and Lobule IX, which have previously been identified as being involved in the DMN. Our results revealed that, compared with the healthy controls, the patients showed significantly reduced cerebellar functional connectivity with the thalamus and several frontal regions including the middle frontal gyrus, anterior cingulate cortex, and supplementary motor area. Moreover, the positive correlations between the strength of frontocerebellar and thalamocerebellar functional connectivity observed in the healthy subjects were diminished in the patients. Our findings implicate disruptive changes of the fronto-thalamo-cerebellar circuit in schizophrenia, which may provide further evidence for the "cognitive dysmetria" concept of schizophrenia.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2014.09.034DOI Listing
December 2014

Altered resting-state amygdala functional connectivity after 36 hours of total sleep deprivation.

PLoS One 2014 5;9(11):e112222. Epub 2014 Nov 5.

Beijing Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Beijing, PR China; Cognitive and Mental Health Research Center, Beijing, PR China.

Objectives: Recent neuroimaging studies have identified a potentially critical role of the amygdala in disrupted emotion neurocircuitry in individuals after total sleep deprivation (TSD). However, connectivity between the amygdala and cerebral cortex due to TSD remains to be elucidated. In this study, we used resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) to investigate the functional connectivity changes of the basolateral amygdala (BLA) and centromedial amygdala (CMA) in the brain after 36 h of TSD.

Materials And Methods: Fourteen healthy adult men aged 25.9 ± 2.3 years (range, 18-28 years) were enrolled in a within-subject crossover study. Using the BLA and CMA as separate seed regions, we examined resting-state functional connectivity with fMRI during rested wakefulness (RW) and after 36 h of TSD.

Results: TSD resulted in a significant decrease in the functional connectivity between the BLA and several executive control regions (left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex [DLPFC], right dorsal anterior cingulate cortex [ACC], right inferior frontal gyrus [IFG]). Increased functional connectivity was found between the BLA and areas including the left posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus (PCC/PrCu) and right parahippocampal gyrus. With regard to CMA, increased functional connectivity was observed with the rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) and right precentral gyrus.

Conclusion: These findings demonstrate that disturbance in amygdala related circuits may contribute to TSD psychophysiology and suggest that functional connectivity studies of the amygdala during the resting state may be used to discern aberrant patterns of coupling within these circuits after TSD.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0112222PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4221616PMC
November 2015

Decreased thalamocortical functional connectivity after 36 hours of total sleep deprivation: evidence from resting state FMRI.

PLoS One 2013 25;8(10):e78830. Epub 2013 Oct 25.

Beijing Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Beijing, PR China ; Cognitive and Mental Health Research Center, Beijing, PR China.

Objectives: The thalamus and cerebral cortex are connected via topographically organized, reciprocal connections, which hold a key function in segregating internally and externally directed awareness information. Previous task-related studies have revealed altered activities of the thalamus after total sleep deprivation (TSD). However, it is still unclear how TSD impacts on the communication between the thalamus and cerebral cortex. In this study, we examined changes of thalamocortical functional connectivity after 36 hours of total sleep deprivation by using resting state function MRI (fMRI).

Materials And Methods: Fourteen healthy volunteers were recruited and performed fMRI scans before and after 36 hours of TSD. Seed-based functional connectivity analysis was employed and differences of thalamocortical functional connectivity were tested between the rested wakefulness (RW) and TSD conditions.

Results: We found that the right thalamus showed decreased functional connectivity with the right parahippocampal gyrus, right middle temporal gyrus and right superior frontal gyrus in the resting brain after TSD when compared with that after normal sleep. As to the left thalamus, decreased connectivity was found with the right medial frontal gyrus, bilateral middle temporal gyri and left superior frontal gyrus.

Conclusion: These findings suggest disruptive changes of the thalamocortical functional connectivity after TSD, which may lead to the decline of the arousal level and information integration, and subsequently, influence the human cognitive functions.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0078830PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3808277PMC
August 2014

Hegu acupuncture for chronic low-back pain: a randomized controlled trial.

J Altern Complement Med 2012 Feb;18(2):130-6

Chengdu Military General Hospital, Chengdu, Sichuan, PR China.

Background: Acupuncture has long been employed for the treatment of chronic low back pain (CLBP). However, very few studies have characterized the effectiveness of the different acupuncture modes for CLBP.

Methods: In total, 187 patients with CLBP participated in this study. Eligible patients were randomized to Hegu acupuncture, Standard acupuncture, or Usual Care groups. Eighteen (18) treatments were provided over 7 weeks. Back-related dysfunction and symptom severity were assessed by the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) and the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), which were collected at baseline and at 8 and 48 weeks after beginning the treatment. Repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was employed for factorial analyses.

Results: Significant differences were found between follow-up and the baseline scores (p<0.05). The Hegu acupuncture group had higher RMDQ scores (8 weeks, 5.3 versus 2.1; 48 weeks, 5.7 versus 3.3; p<0.001 for both) and VAS scores (8 weeks, 1.5 versus 0.5; 48 weeks, 2.6 versus 1.6; p<0.001 for both) compared with the usual care group. The standardized acupuncture group also had higher RMDQ scores (8 weeks, 4.2 versus 2.1; 48 weeks, 4.6 versus 3.3, p<0.001 for both) and VAS scores (8 weeks, 1.3 versus 0.5; 48 weeks, 2.4 versus 1.6, p<0.001 for both) compared with the Usual Care group. The Hegu group had higher RMDQ scores (8 weeks, p<0.05; 48 weeks, p<0.001) and VAS scores (48 weeks, p<0.05) compared with the standardized group. There was a significant difference between the Hegu and standardized acupuncture groups in repeated-measures ANOVA (p<0.05). Across the three testing points, significant differences were found in the RMDQ and VAS scores between the usual care group and both treatment groups (p<0.001).

Conclusions: Both acupuncture modes have beneficial and persistent effectiveness against CLBP compared with the usual care group; Hegu acupuncture is significantly more effective than standardized acupuncture, especially in the long term.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/acm.2010.0779DOI Listing
February 2012

Identification of hyperactive intrinsic amygdala network connectivity associated with impulsivity in abstinent heroin addicts.

Behav Brain Res 2011 Jan 20;216(2):639-646. Epub 2010 Sep 20.

Beijing Institute of Basic Medical Science, Beijing, PR China.

Impulsivity is a pathological hallmark of drug addiction. However, little is known about the neuropsychological underpinnings of this impaired impulsive control network on drug addiction. Twenty two abstinent heroin dependent (HD) subjects and 15 cognitively normal (CN) subjects participated in this study. Resting-state functional connectivity MRI was employed to measure abnormalities in the intrinsic amygdala functional connectivity (iAFC) network activity and the Barratt Impulsive Scale, 11th version was used to measure impulsivity. Linear regression analysis was applied to detect the neural constructs underlying impulsivity by correlating iAFC network activity with impulsive scores. In the HD group, higher impulsivity scores and significantly enhanced iAFC network activity were found, especially in bilateral thalamus, right insula, and inferior frontal gyrus. Markedly decreased anticorrelated iAFC network activity was seen in the left precuneus, and even switched to positive correlation pattern in right precuneus, relative to the CN group. The iAFC network strengths in the HD group were positively correlated with impulsivity in the right subcallosal gyrus, insula, thalamus and posterior cingulate cortex, and negatively correlated in left fusiform area. In the CN group, the left pre-somamotor area-amygdala connectivity was positively correlated, and right orbital frontal cortex-amygdala and precuneus-amygdala connectivity were negatively correlated with impulsivity scores. Our study demonstrates different constructs of the impulsive network in HD and CN subjects. Altered iAFC network connectivity in HD subjects may contribute to the loss of impulsive control. This further facilitates our understanding of the neural underpinnings of behavior dysfunction in addiction.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbr.2010.09.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4518715PMC
January 2011
-->