Publications by authors named "Yong Seung Chung"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Analysis of spatial and seasonal distributions of MODIS aerosol optical properties and ground-based measurements of mass concentrations in the Yellow Sea region in 2009.

Environ Monit Assess 2013 Jan 24;185(1):369-82. Epub 2012 Feb 24.

Korea Centre for Atmospheric Environment Research, 304 Koonghyon, Cheongwon, Choongbuk 363-891, South Korea.

Satellite-retrieved data on aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Ångström exponent (AE) using a moderate resolution imaging spectrometer (MODIS) were used to analyze large-scale distributions of atmospheric aerosols in East Asia. AOD was relatively high in March (0.44 ± 0.25) and low in September (0.24 ± 0.21) in the East Asian region in 2009. Sandstorms originating from the deserts and dry areas in northern China and Mongolia were transported on a massive scale during the springtime, thus contributing to the high AOD in East Asia. However, whereas PM10 with diameters ≤10 μm was the highest in February at Anmyon, Cheongwon, and Ulleung, located leeward about halfway through the Korean Peninsula, AOD rose to its highest in May. The growth of hygroscopic aerosols attendant on increases in relative humidity prior to the Asian monsoon season contributed to a high AOD level in May. AE typically appears at high levels (1.30 ± 0.37) in August due to anthropogenic aerosols originating from the industrial areas in eastern China, while AOD stays low in summer due to the removal process caused by rainfall. The linear correlation coefficients of the MODIS AOD and ground-based mass concentrations of PM10 at Anmyon, Cheongwon, and Ulleung were measured at 0.4~0.6. Four cases (6 days) of mineral dustfall from sandstorms and six cases (12 days) of anthropogenically polluted particles were observed in the central area of the Korean Peninsula in 2009. PM10 mass concentrations increased at both Anmyon and Cheongwon in the cases of mineral dustfall and anthropogenically polluted particles. Cases of dustfall from sandstorms and anthropogenic polluted particles, with increasing PM10 mass concentrations, showed higher AOD values in the Yellow Sea region.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10661-012-2559-3DOI Listing
January 2013

Characteristics of aerosol types during large-scale transport of air pollution over the Yellow Sea region and at Cheongwon, Korea, in 2008.

Environ Monit Assess 2012 Apr 14;184(4):1973-84. Epub 2011 May 14.

Korea Centre for Atmospheric Environment Research, 304 Koonghyon, Cheongwon, Choongbuk, 363-891, South Korea.

Episodes of large-scale transport of airborne dust and anthropogenic pollutant particles from different sources in the East Asian continent in 2008 were identified by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration satellite RGB (red, green, and blue)-composite images and the mass concentrations of ground level particulate matter. These particles were divided into dust, sea salt, smoke plume, and sulfate by an aerosol classification algorithm. To analyze the aerosol size distribution during large-scale transport of atmospheric aerosols, aerosol optical depth (AOD) and fine aerosol weighting (FW) of moderate imaging spectroradiometer aerosol products were used over the East Asian region. Six episodes of massive airborne dust particles, originating from sandstorms in northern China, Mongolia, and the Loess Plateau of China, were observed at Cheongwon. Classified dust aerosol types were distributed on a large-scale over the Yellow Sea region. The average PM10 and PM2.5 ratio to the total mass concentration TSP were 70% and 15%, respectively. However, the mass concentration of PM2.5 among TSP increased to as high as 23% in an episode where dust traveled in by way of an industrial area in eastern China. In the other five episodes of anthropogenic pollutant particles that flowed into the Korean Peninsula from eastern China, the anthropogenic pollutant particles were largely detected in the form of smoke over the Yellow Sea region. The average PM10 and PM2.5 ratios to TSP were 82% and 65%, respectively. The ratio of PM2.5 mass concentrations among TSP varied significantly depending on the origin and pathway of the airborne dust particles. The average AOD for the large-scale transport of anthropogenic pollutant particles in the East Asian region was measured to be 0.42 ± 0.17, which is higher in terms of the rate against atmospheric aerosols as compared with the AOD (0.36 ± 0.13) for airborne dust particles with sandstorms. In particular, the region ranging from eastern China, the Yellow Sea, and the Korean Peninsula to the Korea East Sea was characterized by high AOD distributions. In the episode of anthropogenic polluted aerosols, FW averaged 0.63 ± 0.16, a value higher than that in the episode of airborne dust particles (0.52 ± 0.13) with sandstorms, showing that fine anthropogenic pollutant particles contribute greatly to atmospheric aerosols in East Asia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10661-011-2092-9DOI Listing
April 2012

The solar eclipse and associated atmospheric variations observed in South Korea on 22 July 2009.

Air Qual Atmos Health 2010 Sep 8;3(3):125-130. Epub 2010 Jan 8.

Korea Centre for Atmospheric Environment Research, Khangnae, Cheongwon-Cheongju, 363-891 South Korea.

A partial solar eclipse occurred in South Korea on 22 July 2009. It started at 09:30 a.m. and lasted until 12:14 LST with coverage of between 76.8% and 93.1% of the sun. The observed atmospheric effects of the eclipse are presented. It was found that from the onset of the eclipse, solar radiation was reduced by as much as 88.1 approximately 89.9% at the present research centre. Also, during the eclipse, air temperature decreased slightly or remained almost unchanged. After the eclipse, however, it rose by 2.5 to 4.5 degrees C at observed stations. Meanwhile, relative humidity increased and wind speeds were lowered by the eclipse. Ground-level ozone was observed to decrease during the event.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11869-009-0060-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2914286PMC
September 2010

On the sandstorms and associated airborne dustfall episodes observed at Cheongwon in Korea in 2005.

Air Qual Atmos Health 2010 Jun 11;3(2):83-94. Epub 2009 Nov 11.

Korea Centre for Atmospheric Environment Research, 304 Koonghyon, Kangnae, Cheongwon, Choongbuk, 363-891 Korea.

Sandstorms in the desert and loess regions of north-northwestern China and Mongolia, as well as the associated dustfall episodes in the Korean Peninsula, were monitored between January and December 2005. Composite color images were made on the basis of data received directly from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration satellite advanced very high resolution radiometer, and the distribution and transport of dust clouds were analyzed. The ground concentrations of PM10 and PM2.5 and visibility during dustfall episodes (where the PM10 concentration exceeds 190 mug m(-3) for at least 2 h) were also analyzed at Cheongwon, in central South Korea, which lies in the leeward direction from the origin of sandstorms. Fewer strong sandstorms occurred in the places of origin in 2005, mainly because of the snow cover with moderate high and low pressure systems in the place of dust origin. The weather patterns explain why there were fewer dustfall episodes in Korea in 2005 than in the period between 1997 and 2004. A total of seven dustfall episodes were monitored in Korea in 2005 and they covered a period of 11 days. In the summer of 2005, sandstorms occurred less frequently in the source region due to high humidity and weaker winds; as a result, there were no dustfall episodes in Korea. When the sandstorms at the source headed directly to Korea without passing through any large cities or industrial areas of China, the PM2.5 concentrations were up to 20% of the PM10 concentrations. However, when the sandstorms headed to Korea via the industrial areas of eastern China, where they pick up anthropogenic air pollutants, the PM2.5 concentrations were at least 25% of the PM10 concentrations. In five of the cases that were observed and analyzed in 2005, the PM10 concentrations of the sand dust that originated in the deserts were 190 mug m(-3) or less, which is below the level of a dustfall episode.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11869-009-0054-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2860092PMC
June 2010