Publications by authors named "Yoel Solomon"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Outcomes after transfemoral carotid artery stenting stratified by preprocedural symptom status.

J Vasc Surg 2020 Dec 2. Epub 2020 Dec 2.

Division of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Department of Surgery, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass. Electronic address:

Objective: The available data on outcomes after transfemoral carotid artery stenting (TFCAS) originate from the early experience with TFCAS. Although most previous studies stratified outcomes according to a symptomatic or asymptomatic presentation, they often did not specify the degree of presenting neurologic injury. We previously reported that the outcomes after carotid endarterectomy differed according to neurologic injury severity, the contemporary perioperative outcomes of TFCAS stratified by the specific presenting symptom status are unknown.

Methods: Patients with data in the Vascular Quality Initiative database who had undergone TFCAS from 2016 to 2020 were included. We stratified patients according to their preprocedural symptom status as asymptomatic, formerly symptomatic (last symptoms >180 days before the procedure), or recently symptomatic (symptoms <180 days before the procedure). The symptoms included stroke, hemispheric transient ischemic attack (TIA), and ocular TIA. We compared the occurrence of in-hospital stroke or death (stroke/death) among the asymptomatic, formerly symptomatic, and specific subtypes of recently symptomatic patients. Multivariable logistic regression models were constructed to adjust for the baseline differences among the groups.

Results: Of the 9807 included patients, 2650 (27%) had had recent stroke, 842 (9%), recent hemispheric TIA, and 360 (4%), recent ocular TIA. In addition, 795 patients (8%) were formerly symptomatic and 5160 (53%) were asymptomatic. The patients with recent stroke had a perioperative stroke/death rate of 5.5%, higher than that of patients with recent hemispheric TIA (2.4%; P < .001) or recent ocular TIA (2.8%; P = .03) and asymptomatic patients (1.4%; P < .001). The stroke/death rate was greater for patients with recent ocular TIA than for asymptomatic patients (2.8% vs 1.4%; P = .04). Formerly symptomatic patients had higher stroke/death rates compared with asymptomatic patients (3.5% vs 1.4%; P < .001). On multivariable-adjusted analysis, recent stroke was associated with higher stroke/death compared with recent hemispheric TIA (odds ratio [OR], 2.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.6-4.3; P < .001) and asymptomatic status (OR, 4.1; 95% CI, 3.0-5.6; P < .001) and demonstrated a trend toward higher stroke/death compared with recent ocular TIA (OR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.0-3.9; P = .06). Furthermore, asymptomatic status was associated with lower stroke/death compared with formerly symptomatic status (OR, 0.4; 95% CI, 0.2-0.6; P < .001).

Conclusions: For patients undergoing TFCAS, recent stroke was associated with greater odds of in-hospital stroke/death after TFCAS compared with recent hemispheric TIA. Also, formerly symptomatic status was associated with greater odds of stroke/death compared with asymptomatic status. These findings support further symptom stratification by the degree of the presenting neurologic injury in the preoperative risk assessment.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jvs.2020.11.031DOI Listing
December 2020

In-hospital outcomes alone underestimate rates of 30-day major adverse events after carotid artery stenting.

J Vasc Surg 2020 04 13;71(4):1233-1241. Epub 2020 Feb 13.

Division of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Department of Surgery, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass. Electronic address:

Objective: Outcome studies using databases collecting only hospital discharge data underestimate morbidity and mortality because of failure to capture postdischarge events. The proportion of postdischarge major adverse events is well characterized in patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy (CEA) but has yet to be characterized after carotid artery stenting (CAS).

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed all patients undergoing CAS from 2011 to 2017 using the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program procedure targeted database to evaluate rates of 30-day major adverse events, stratified by in-hospital and postdischarge occurrences. The primary outcome was 30-day stroke/death. Multivariable analysis using purposeful selection was used to identify independent factors associated with in-hospital, postdischarge, and 30-day stroke/death events.

Results: Of the 899 patients undergoing CAS, reporting of in-hospital outcomes alone would yield a stroke/death rate of 2.7%, substantially underestimating the 30-day stroke/death rate of 4.0%. In fact, 35% of stroke/deaths, 27% of strokes, 73% of deaths, 35% of cardiac events, and 35% of stroke/death/cardiac events occurred after discharge. More postdischarge stroke/death events occurred after treatment of symptomatic compared with asymptomatic patients (47% vs 27%; P < .001). During this same study period, the 30-day stroke/death rate after CEA was 2.6%, with similar proportions of postdischarge strokes (28% vs 27%; P = .51) compared with CAS but lower proportions of postdischarge deaths (55% vs 73%; P < .001). After CAS, patients experiencing postdischarge stroke/death events had a shorter postoperative length of stay compared with patients with in-hospital stroke/death (1 [1-2] vs 5 [3-10] days; P < .001). Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was independently associated with postdischarge stroke/death (odds ratio [OR], 4.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2-16; P = .02) after CAS. Nonwhite ethnicity was independently associated with overall 30-day stroke/death (OR, 3.4; 95% CI, 1.4-7.9; P < .01), whereas statin use was associated with not having stroke/death within 30 days (OR, 0.5; 95% CI, 0.2-1.0; P = .049).

Conclusions: More than one-quarter of perioperative strokes occur following discharge after both CAS and CEA. A higher proportion of postdischarge deaths occur after CAS in symptomatic patients, which may reflect treatment of a population of higher risk patients. Further investigation is needed to elucidate the cause of postdischarge stroke to develop methods to reduce these complications.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jvs.2019.06.201DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7096257PMC
April 2020

Contemporary outcomes after carotid endarterectomy in high-risk anatomic and physiologic patients.

J Vasc Surg 2020 01 20;71(1):104-110. Epub 2019 Aug 20.

Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Mass. Electronic address:

Objective: Current guidelines state that the acceptable 30-day postoperative stroke/death rate after carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is <3% for asymptomatic patients and <6% for symptomatic patients. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has identified certain high-risk characteristics used to define patients at highest risk for CEA for whom carotid artery stenting would be reimbursed. We evaluated the impact of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services physiologic and anatomic high-risk criteria on major adverse event rates after CEA in asymptomatic and symptomatic patients.

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed all patients undergoing CEA from 2011 to 2017 in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program vascular targeted database. Patients with high-risk anatomic or physiologic characteristics were identified by a predefined variable and were compared with normal-risk patients. The primary outcome was 30-day stroke/death, stratified by symptom status.

Results: We identified 25,788 patients undergoing CEA, of whom 60% were treated for asymptomatic carotid disease. Among all patients, high-risk physiology or anatomy was associated with higher rates of 30-day stroke/death compared with normal-risk patients (physiologic risk, 4.6% vs 2.3% [P < .001]; anatomic risk, 3.6% vs 2.3% [P < .001]). Patients who met criteria for high-risk physiology or anatomy also had higher rates of cardiac events (physiologic risk, 3.1% vs 1.6% [P < .001]; anatomic risk, 2.3% vs 1.6% [P < .01]), but only patients with high-risk anatomy had higher rates of cranial nerve injury (physiologic risk, 2.4% vs 2.5% [P = .81]; anatomic risk, 4.3% vs 2.5% [P < .001]). Asymptomatic patients with high-risk physiology or anatomy had higher rates of 30-day stroke/death, especially in the physiologic high-risk group (physiologic risk, 4.7% vs 1.5% [P < .001]; anatomic risk, 2.6% vs 1.5% [P < .01]), compared with normal-risk patients. However, among symptomatic patients, differences in stroke/death were seen only with high-risk anatomic patients and not with high-risk physiologic patients (physiologic risk, 4.6% vs 3.4% [P = .12]; anatomic risk, 4.8% vs 3.4% [P = .01]).

Conclusions: As currently selected, contemporary real-world outcomes after CEA in asymptomatic carotid disease patients meeting high-risk physiologic criteria show an unacceptably high 30-day stroke/death rate, well above the 3% threshold. These results suggest the need for better selection of patients and preoperative optimization before elective CEA.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jvs.2019.05.041DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6926142PMC
January 2020